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Full text of "Quincy Sun July - Dec 1981"

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Concerts, Pageants, 



Awjqyj onqn«j »u««*0 BBU0 MJ Hlff jHllff lit 4ttll'*<* 




Traditional Fourth of July 
holiday events in various 
sections of the city will feature 
band concerts, a beauty 
pageant, parades and field 
days. 



Among the scheduled 
events for the three days of 
festivities that start Friday 
are: 

Friday, July 3 

Merrymount Beach - Quincy 
Shore Drive, Merrymount, 7 
p.m. to 10 p.m., band concert 
and beauty contest, sponsored 
by the Merrymount 

Association. 

Saturday, July 4 

Baker Beach - Palmer St., 
Germantown, field day, 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m., sponsored by the 
Baker Improvement 



Association. 

Welcome Young Playground 
- Sagamore St., Atlantic, 8 
a.m. to 11 p.m., field dav, 
sponsored by the Atlantic 
Community Association. 

Faxon Park - Faxon Park 
Rd., South Quincy, field day, 8 
a.m. to 6 p.m., sponsored by 
the Adams Heights Men's 
Club. 

Heron Rd. Playground • 
Heron Rd., Adams Shore, 
parade and flag raising, 11 
a.m.; family-type concert and 
supper, 6 p.m. to 12 midnight, 



sponsored by the Adams Shore 
Community Association. 

General Palmer Park - Yard- 
arm Lane, Germantown, 
barbeque and field day, 10 
a.m. to 7 p.m., sponsored by 
Dar-Mi Mobile Market. 

O'Rourke Field - Quarry St., 
West Quincy, field day, 9 a.m. 
to 3 p.m., sponsored by the 
Morrisette Legion Post. 

Fore River Field - Nevada 
Rd., Quincy Point, field day, 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., sponsored 
by the Ward 2 Civic 
Association. 



Wendall Moses - Park Ave., j^. 
Squantum, parade and field 
day, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., 
sponsored by the Squantum 
Community Association. 

Forbes Hill Playground - 
Forbes Hill Rd., Wollaston, 
block party, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., 
sponsored by Summit Ave. 
residents. 

Sunday, July 5 

LaBrecque Field - Sea St., 
Houghs Neck, carnival, July 5 
through Saturday, July 11, 
sponsored by the Houghs Neck 
Community Council. 



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Vol. 13 No. 40 



Thursday, July 2, 1981 




• 13 Businesses Would Be Displaced • Public Hearing July 23 

New Route For E-W Connector 




COLORFUL FLOWERS were recently planted by neighborhood 
children at the memorial for the late School Traffic Supervisor Dorothy 
E. Rae, at the Houghs Neck Fire Station. From left, are Kerry Eden, 
Nancy Powers, Darrel Aiguier, Ed Pettinelli, Steve Picarski, Chad 
Hailed and Robert Callahan. (Quincy Sun Phaio by Daw Gillixriy) 

$2.2 Million HUD Grant 
For Development 



The Department ot Housing 
and Urban Development has 
awarded a $2, 175,000 community 
development block grant to 
Quincy, it was announced by 
Cong. Brian J. Donnelly. 

The money will be used for 
social services to low and moderate 
income residents, rehabilitation of 
parks and playgrounds and to 
promote economic development 
by capitalizing loans. 

The bulk of the money will be 

$13,000 To Study 
Vacant Schools 

Quincy has received a $13,000 
grant from the state to study ways 
of utilizing recently vacated 
school buildings. The Planning 
Department will administer the 
grant. 



divided up among these target 
areas: 

Atlantic. $426,345. 

Houghs Neck, $185,909. 

Southwest Quincy. $294,917. 

South Quincy. $115,264. 

Wollaston, $179,678. 

Montclair, $216,178. 

A total of $50,000 will be 
devoted to the commercial area 
revitali/ation area while $174,464 
is earmarked for scattered site 
home rehabilitation. 



By TOM HENSHAW 

A new route for the controversial Granite St. - Revere Rd. Connector, 
slightly north of the old one, will have a public hearing Thursday, July 23, at 
4:30 p.m. by the State Department of Public Works. 

businesses would be include: 

Premier Furniture, 14 Revere 
Rd.; Napoli Pizza, Sportlight 
Cafe, Hair for All Seasons, South 
Shore TV, 1570-76 Hancock St.; 
Community Opticians, Import 
Village, Beacon Fabrics, plus a 
management firm and a tax 
consultant, 1562-68 Hancock St. 

Also going under the new plan 
will be Standard TV, 1554 
Hancock St.; Book Haven, 1552 
Hancock St.; and Colpitts Travel, 
1550 Hancock St., to create access 
to the two ends of Hancock St. 
while work is in progress. 

The new route will take some 1 7 
feet off the southern end of the old 
Gilchrist building in the Ross 
Parking Area, now occupied by T. 
J. Maxx. 

"It's not enough to terminate T. 
J. Maxx's lease," said Lydon. 

The Bicycle Revival shop and 
the Household Finance office in 



Thirteen 
displaced. 

Planning Director James Lydon 
said the proposed route was 
changed to permit access to 
Hancock St. while the connector 
was being built under it at the 
intersection of Revere Rd. 

The new route is a few feet 
farther north than the old one so 
that Revere Rd. itself can be 
preserved as a surface connector 
between Hancock and Mechanic 
Sts. and the new highway. 

The connector starts at Granite 
St., crosses the M BTA tracks, goes 
through the Ross Parking Area 
and right through the middle of the 
building that was vacated by Sears 
Roebuck last fall. 

Many of the same business 
establishments that were to be 
taken under the old plan on the 
other side of Hancock St. also will 
be lost under the new. They 



the Parkingway, which were 
scheduled to go under the old plan, 
will be preserved under the new. 

Lydon said Stephen Weiner, the 
developer who was interested in 
building a mall in the John 
Hancock Parking Area, has shown 
an interest in developing the corner 
at the connector and Hancock St. 

The John Hancock mall has 
been pushed onto the back burner. 

"The mall is a long range plan 
now," said Mayor Arthur H. 
Tobin. The money market is not 
right at the present time. 

"When you're dealing with 
retailers it's difficult to project 
needs three, four or five years 
down the line, particularly when 
they are not sure what the city is 
going to do. 

"We've got to get the road and 
do a few other things before we can 
generate a lot of enthusiasm 
among retailers." 



Sheets Wants Crackdown 



Heavy Fines Proposed 
For Quarry Vandals 



City Councillor James A. Sheets 
is proposing the stiffest penalties 
yet for revellers and vandals who 
are making life miserable for 
residents who live around 
Swingle's Quarry in West Quincy. 

"It's like a war zone there on a 
warm weekend," said Sheets. 

A meeting of residents of the 
Copeland, Crescent and California 
Sts. area last Thursday produced 
horror tales of vandalism that 
included a garage door torn from 
its hinges for use as a bathroom. 

With that in mind. Sheets 



introduced an order in the Council 
Tuesday night that would create a 
"No Trespassing" area around the 
quarries under penalties of stiff 
fines. 

The first offense would call for a 
$150 fine with $200 fines for each 
succeeding violation. In addition, 
there would be a $100 fine for 
deliberately tearing down the "No 
Trespassing" sign. 

Sheets said the situation is so 
critical that he added an 
emergency preamble to the order 
which would make it effective the 



moment it is passed by the Council 
and signed by Mayor Arthur H. 
Tobin. 

The quarries in question include 
the water-filled Swingle's and 
Granite Railway, which attract 
swimmers, and Badger's Quarry, 
which has been filled in but is a site 
for parties. 

Sheets said some provision will 
be made for people to obtain 
permission to visit the quarry area 
on legitimate pursuits. The 
location is popular as a practice 
area for rock climbers. 



Tobin Visits N.Y. Seeking 'A' Bond Rating 



Mayor Arthur H. Tobin spent 
Monday in New York trying to 
explain to Moody's bond rating 
service why Quincy should have an 
"A" rating in spite of Proposition 
2'/ 2 . 



Quincy was one of 3 7 
communities in Massachusetts 
whose ratings were suspended a 
few months ago while the effects of 
Prop 2 1 /: were analyzed by 
Moody's. 

Tobin said the rating service 



wanted to know what the city has 
done to meet the challenge of 2'/: in 
the handling of its debts and 
expenses and the generation of 
additional income. 

"They seemed to be impressed." 



he said. 

With Tobin at the meeting with 
Moody's were Treasurer Robert E. 
Foy 111 and former auditor 
Charles L. Shea, filling in for 
acting auditor William Grindlay. 
who is buy with year end figures. 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2. 1981 



At The Adams School 



Auld Lang Syne 




FOR AULD LANG SYNE — Adams School students sang that sentimental favorite at 
the recent Adams Family Reunion which included an open house and closing ceremonies. 
Playing the piano was music teacher Esther Erbe. The school opened at its present 
location in 1913 and is closing this year. 



A PLAQUE in commemoration ofthe consolidation ofthe Adams and Lincoln Hancock 
Schools will go to the Lincoln-Hancock which the majority of Adams students will attend 
next year. From left at the Adams Family Reunion are School Committee vice chairman 
Christopher Kennedy, Jean Ann Maclean, Adams principal; Mrs. Nancy Santry, Parent 
Teacher Associaton president; and School Superintendent Dr. Lawrence P. Creedon. 

(Quincy Sun Pholtis by Dare Gillooly) 



McCauley Promises Seniors More Security T.J.'s Red Carpet Gets 



City Councillor Francis X. 
McCauley. a candidate for mayor, 
has promised to give security in the 
city's senior citizen housing 
complexes a top priority in his 



administration. 

"I will push for state and federal 
assistance to obtain security 
personnel for the Quincy Housing 
Authority," McCauley said in talks 



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before groups at Sawyer Towers 
and 1000 Southern Artery. 

He noted that Quincy police, at 
his request, have increased their 
patrols in the strets adjacent to the 
elderly housing developments. 

McCauley also outlined for the 
senior citizens the new ambulance 
program that was recently put into 
effect in the City. 



Earlier Closing Hours 



By NANCY McLAUGHLIN 

Ten to 15 area residents and a 
ward councillor attended 
Tuesday's License Board meeting 
requesting immediate revocation 
of the license held by T.J.'s Red 
Carpet, 12-16 Brook St., because 
of neighborhood disturbances. 

Though the license was not 



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revoked, the board did vote 2 to 1 
to roll back the Wollaston 
establishment's hours to 9:30 p.m., 
effective in five days. 

City Clerk John Gillis voted 
against the earlier closing hour 
contending a paid police detail 
would help the situation. Health 
Commissioner Dr. Robert P. 
McKeogh and Building Inspector 
Allan MacDonald were in favor. 

According to a June II, police 
report by Officer John Gilfeather 
and Detective Robert Miller, the 
establishment violated its 1 a.m. 
closing by allowing customers to 
drink inside and outside the 
premises. 

Gilfeather said he spoke to 
managers of the establishment 
about the violations on several 
occasions this year and last year. 

Abutter James Leone, 
representing area residents, then 
told the board of patrons drinking 
beer outside the lounge, being loud 
and noisy, fighting in the street, 
illegally parking, throwing empty 
bottles on private property, and 
using private property as 
bathrooms. 

Leone said the situation, 
especially after midnight, is 
"intolerable - with capital letters." 

"Sleeping is out ofthe question, 
"continued Leone, "and I act as the 
city's best employee - cleaning up 
the area every morning." He also 
presented the board a petition 
signed by nearly 50 residents 
requesting revocation of the 
license. 

Other residents recounted 
similar complaints. 

Councillor James Sheets said 
there was failure on the part ofthe 
owners historically to control the 
problems. 

Sheets' subsequent recom- 
mendation of revocation of the 
license was met by applause from 
the area residents. 

Councillor Francis McCauley 
told of a Houghs Neck 
establishment Almost Joey's, 
which was closed because it was 
not run properly. 

McCauley recommended if the 
situation can't be brought to a 
satisfactory conclusion, "put 
padlocks on the doors." 

Red Carpet manager Edward 
Delaney told the board he tries to 
control patrons and clean the area. 
He also presented a petition of 100 
people in favor of keeping the 
establishment open. 

City Clerk John Gillis said there 
was not enough in the police report 
to warrant revocation of the 
license. 

He also pointed out that this was 
the first time the establishment has 
been before the board on a liquor 
violation. 



1 



Final Contract Signed 



Thurvla). July 1 1911 Quincy Sun Pagt J 



Cable TV Wiring Starts In Quincy Point 



By TOM Ml AMI AW 

Mayor Arthur H. Tobin signed 
the final contract to bring cable 
television to Quincy last week and 
almost immediately the first wires 
went up on a pole at the corner of 
Elm and South Walnut Sts., 
Quincy Point. 

David J. Keefe, general manager 
of Quincy Cablesystems, said 
service is expected to begin to 
subscribers in Quincy Point and 
parts of South Quincy sometime in 
December. 

The target date for wiring the 
whole city is June, 1982. 

Keefe also announced that three 
percent of the stock in Quincy 
Cablesystems has been put up for 
sale to non-profit organizations in 
Quincy and there have already 
been five takers. 

One quarter of one per cent each 
has been purchased by the South 
Shore YMCA, the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association, the Ward 2 Civic 
Association, Cerebral Palsy of the 
South Shore, and the 59ers Club of 
the North Quincy Knights of 
Columbus. 

Each paid $2,(X)0, said Keefe. 

"We canvassed 90 organizations 
and these five committed 
themselves to purchase the stock," 
he said. 'There are discussions 
pending with some others to buy 
the rest of the shares." 

Keefe said it is the first time in 
Massachusetts that stock has been 





CABLE CONTRACT - Agreement with Quincy Cablesystems to bring 
cable television to the city is signed by Mayor Arthur H. Tobin. Left to 
right, Barry D. Lemieux, executive vice president of American 
Cablesystems; George Riley, chairman of the Mayor's Advisory 
Committee on Cable Television; Mayor Tobin; and David O'Keefe, 
general manager of Quincy Cablesystems. 



WORKMAN John Mansur installs guide wire on pole at Elm and South 
Walnut Sts., Quincy Point, in first physical step to bringing cable TV to 
Quincy. 

((Juincy Sun I'holtis by \ltir\ O'kri'lfr) 



offered for sale to non-profit 
groups after the prov isional license 
has been awarded. 

Cablesystems has been 
negotiating for space on existing 
poles since the provisional license 



was awarded three and a half 
months ago. All the "make ready" 
work has been done. 

The poles now carry wires for 
Mass Electric, the telephone 
company and the fire alarm 



system. 

Keefe said the city will be wired 
up in these five phases. 

• Quincy Point and South 
Quincy east of the MBTA tracks. 

• Wollaston and North Quincy 
east of the T tracks plus 
Squantum. Norfolk Downs and 
part of Montclair. 

• Wollaston and North Quincy 



west of the MBTA tracks and 
north of Eurnace Brook Parkway. 

• Houghs Neck, Germantown, 
Merrymount and Adams Shore. 

• West Quincy south of 
Furnace Brook Parkway and west 
of the T tracks. 

Keefe said home installation will 
be free during the first 60 days that 
service is offered. 



Teacher Laid Off, 
Plans School Board Run 



Nicholas C. Verenis, 34, of 82 
Andrews Rd., Wollaston, a civics 
teacher at North Quincy High 
School whose name appears on 
the list of teachers laid off, has 
taken out nomination papers to 
run for School Committee. 

Verenis was joined this week at 
the election office by City 
Councillors John J. Lydon Jr. and 
James A. Sheets, who took out 



papers to run for re-election in 
Wards 3 and 4 respectively. 

All incumbents have now either 
announced or taken out papers 
for re-election except Mayor 
Arthur H. Tobin, Ward 5 
Councillor Stephen J. McGrath, 
and School Committeewomen 
Mary Collins and Joan Picard. 

Tobin apparently is not going to 



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expected to be nominated by Gov. 
Edward J. King for the post of 
clerk magistrate in Quincy 
District Court. 



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Page 4 Quino Sun Thursday, Jul> 2, I98I 



USPS453-Q60 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1372 Hancock St.. Quincy. Massachusetts 02 1 6^ 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W Bosworth, Jr. 

15c Per Copy - $7.00 Per Year - Out of State $10.00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

POSTMASTER: Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St 

Quincy. Mass. 02169 

Member New England Press Association 



The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that 
part of an advertisement in which the typographical error 
occurs. 






A Tribute 
To The Gridley 



Friends and neighbors of 
the Gridley Bryant School in 
West Quincy recently penned 
this tribute to the venerable 
school, which closed for the 
last time June 25. 

The Gridley Bryant School 
has had a rich 85 years of 
service to the education of 
children in the Quincy public 
schools. 

It was named after a self- 
educated engineer, a builder 
by trade, who helped lay the 
corner stone of the Bunker Hill 
Monument. 

Gridley Bryant continues his 
contributions to society and to 
history by devising innovative 
appliances for the railroad. 
Along with Solomon Willard, 
he devised a way of hauling 
and dressing Quincy granite. 

In 1891, Quincy showed her 
appreciation of Solomon 
Willard by naming a school 
after him; and in 18%, it 
honored Gridley Bryant with a 
similar school. 

In January. 1897, the 
Gridley Bryant enrolled 275 
students from the Willard 
School, spanning grades one 
through eight. Oddly enough, 
when Gridley closed in June, 
approximately one third of its 
students will be given back to 
Willard. 

The contributions of many 



people have made the history 
of the Gridley Bryant School 
rich and meaningful. 

Miss Margaret Sweeney, 
who started her 40 years of 
service in 1908 at the Willard 
School, became the first 
woman principal in the Quincy 
public schools at the Gridley 
Bryant. 

Dedicated educators past 
and present have enriched the 
Gridley with instructional 
programs and the Student 
Centered Learning System 
approach. 

The current superintendent. 
Dr. Lawrence P. Creedon, was 
an assistant principal at the 
Gridley. 

The most important integral 
part of any educational facility 
is the community and the 
Gridley Bryant School 
community highlighted the 
growth of the school with its 
mini-fairs, international 

nights, and an active P.T.C.C. 

On June 26. the Gridley 
Bryant School closed its doors 
for the last time, ending 85 
years of service to the children 
and the community. The 
graduating class and all the 
students of past classes have 
taken with them a proud 
heritage and valuable 
experience which cannot be 
erased by time. 




uincy 




uiz 



Four winners in the Quincy Quiz this week. 

Trudy Tobin of 158 Darrow St., Houghs Neck, and Jimmy 
Cosseboom of 48 Greene St., Wollaston, win T-shirts and Donna 
Uvanitte of 10 Beebe Rd., Germantown, and Paula O'Brien- 
Broome of 32 Atherton St., Quincy Point, win bumper stickers. 

Each week two Quincy Sun T-shirts and two Quincy Sun 
bumper stickers are offered as prizes in the Quincy Quiz. 

The first two readers (one a mail subscriber) to submit to the 
Sun office in writing the correct answers to the week's five 
questions receive T-shirts. The next two receive bumper stickers. 

One person in each home is eligible to compete in any one week 
and no person is eligible to win more than three T-shirts. 

77m neck's Quincy Quiz: 

1. In what section of the city is Perry Beach? 

2. True or false: The Mayor, the City Council and the School 
Committee are the only municipal officers elected by the voters of 
Quincy. 

3. What is the name of the presiding justice of the Quincy 
District Court'.' 

4. What well-known Quincv landmark is located at 470 South 
St.? 

5. the Squantum Naval Air Station was closed in: 1946? 1951? 
1959.' 

insuors in last uevk's Quincy Quiz: 

1. I he New Haven Railroad branch that served Quincy was 
named the Old Colony Division. 

2. I he Rev. John McMahon is pastor of St. Marv's Church. 

3. lakeside Ave. is in the Houghs Neck section of the city. 

4. False The Merrvmount section of the cit) is in Ward I. 

5. Cilad lidings Church is located at 158 Washington St. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Will History Repeat For Geary? 




Will history repeat? 

Nineteen years ago, a 38-year-old Wollaston 
resident came out of political no-where to 
become lieutenant governor. 

Francis X. Bellotti wasjust 
another candidate most of the 
so-called experts said. They 
didn't give him a chance. 

But what they didn't know 
was that Bellotti was all over 
the state gathering delegate 
support long before the 
Democratic state convention in Springfield that 
year. 

He got the nomination and went on to defeat 
Republican Francis Perry of Duxbury in the 
final election and became one of the powers in 
state politics. 

Now, another young 
Wollaston man, 33-year old 
William Geary of Elm Ave. 
hopes to do the same thing. 
He's off and running already. 
In fact last night 
(Wednesday), a 7-to-9 p.m. 
GEARY reception was scheduled for 

him at the Quincy Historical Society co-hosted 
by City Councillors Steve McGrath and Joanne 
Condon. 

This is Geary's first run for elective office but 
he's no stranger to political circles. 

He was appointment secretary to Gov. Mike 
Dukakis and was first assistant to State 
Secretary Michael Connolly. He was involved in 
bringing the state Constitution to Quincy forthe 
big celebration in 1979. 

Geary, executive director of the Boston 
Advertising Club, is off to an early campaign 
start. Like Bellotti. 

And like Bellotti, he hopes to nail down the 
Democratic nomination by lining up early 
support before the other contenders really get 
warmed up. 

□ 

INTERESTING to note that Gregory 
Brooks, candidate for a City Council at-large 
seat not only frankly admits he is a Republican 
but is running as a Republican. 

It wasn't too long ago that most Republicans 
hoped voters wouldn't notice they were 




Republicans in a Quincy non-partisan election. 
Quincy is so strongly Democratic. 

In fact today there are only two Republicans 
in elective office: Councillor Francis McCauley, 
candidate for mayor, and School 
Committeeman Frank Ansclmo. 

But Ronald Reagan's stunning victory over 
Jimmy Carter and his more recent budget wins 
over Thomas (Tip) O'Neill indicate that being a 
Republican isn't a political liability anymore. 
Even in Quincy. 

The GOP elephant 30 years or so ago was king 
of the Quincy political jungle. Then it almost 
became extinct. But there seems to be new life in 
the old boy now. And that's good. The last thing 
we need is a one-party system. 

D 
CHIEF ASSESSOR John P. Comer was elected 
as Massachusetts' representative on the 
American Legion National Executive 
Committee at the recent Legion convention in 
Springfield. 

Comer, who was state 
commander in 1975-76 now 
fills the highest Legion post in 
the state. 

William Timcoe, past 
commander of the Houghs 
Neck Post, was elected 
Norfolk County Commander. 

Paul A.M." Hunt, past COMER 

commander of the Morrisette Post, was 
appointed state judge advocate by the newly 
elected commander, Henry Troville of 
Somerville. 

□ 

STORK DEPT: Richard Koch, Jr., candidate 
for City Council at-large, and his pretty wife, the 
former Nancy Kelly, are expecting their first 
little constituent mid-July. 

D 
BILL BRABAZON, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Brabazon (she's the City Council's 
secretary) is now a member of the Nashua N.H. 
police department. Bill was graduated with 
honors from the Northeastern University 
Criminal Justice School and was an Army MP 
for two years. He's a former Quincy Sun news 
carrier. (And that makes us feel a little older.) 




Readers Forum 



Takes Issue With LaRaia Letter 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

1 would like to respond to the 
comments that Mr. LaRaia made 
in the readers column on June 25, 
1981. He viciously attacks our 
present Mayor, Arthur Tobin on 
such subjects as layoffs, firings, 
and questions his fairness, 
compassion, and understanding. It 
is this readers opinion that Mr. 
LaRaia has forgotten about his 
past administration in this City. 
From 1975 to 1977 this city became 
the laughing stock of Massachu- 
setts. How can one forget city 
otlicals being indicted and 



convicted of criminal charges? 
Who could forget Mr. LaRaia's 
January massacre when hundreds 
of people were either fired or laid 
off from positions; or the huge 
defecit he left the city when his 
term expired. 

It appears Mr. LaRaia does not 
realize the "pride and progress" 
that the current Mayor has 
brought back to this City. The 
billion of dollars in development 
and construction which will be a 
tremendous boost in tax revenue 
dollars and it will be us the 
taxpayers who will reap the 



benefits. The job of being Mayor 
of this City is thankless enough 
where, especially at the present 
time, you are damned if you do and 
damned if don't. 1 would like to 
thank Mayor Tobin for the 
professionalism, patience, and 
understanding he has demon- 
strated while in office. I would like 
to conclude by telling Mr. LaRaia 
that the citizens of Quincy are sick 
and tired of his personal vendetta 
against the present mayor. 

James W. Minton 

63 Colby Rd. 

North Quincy 



A Tribute To Paul Sullivan 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

On Tuesday evening, (May 26) 
I attended the Willard School 
Spring Concert, held at the 
Lincoln-Hancock School. 1 am so 
impressed with the music ability 
given (our) children by all the 
music instructors who teach in the 
Quincy School System. Particu- 
larly. Mr. Paul Sullivan, our 
daughter's violin teacher for the 
past two years. 

We have met many good 
teachers, but Mr. Sullivan is the 



most devoted, sincere, 

conscientious, and understanding 
teacher we've know. Our Quincy 
students are "losing out" on not 
re-hiring him! 

Please, please, reconsider this 
man, he is so dedicated. The 
children "love" him. He has 
dedicated many "non-paying" 
hours for the benefit of his 
students taking a string instru- 
ment. How many teachers have 
this "undying" interest and 



concern for their students? Even 
with the knowledge that he is 
"losing his job?" 

A remarkable man! (and there 
are others). Music and sports are 
as vital as scholastic achievement 
for children. The two former 
provide a release of energy and 
emotion for students to become 
well rounded healthy individuals. 
Thank you. 

Edwin and Joan Boland. 

Parents 

30 Reardon St. 



Thursday, July 2. 1911 Quincy Sun Pug* 9 



People Want Limit On State Spending 

Brownell Survey Results 
Favor No Change In Prop. 2V& 



Nearly half of the respondents 
who took part in a recent survey 
by Rep. Thomas F. Brownell said 
that they want Proposition 2'/j 
implemented with no changes at 
all. 

And there was overwhelming 
support (85 per cent) for freezing 
state spending at the 1981 level 
and returning the additional 
revenue to the cities and towns as 
local aid. 

"It is clear to me," said 
Brownell, "that the citizens of 
Ouincy want the state to cut 
excessive spending and work 
under the same fiscal constraints 
as the municipalities. 

"This survey reinforces my 
long held view that the state 
government must assume the 
burden it has placed on cities and 
towns with state-mandated 
programs." 

Brownell's survey was 
conducted by mail between May 8 
and June 8 among 350 residents 
of the Second Norfolk District who 
voted in the Nov. 8, 1980 election. 
The response rate was about 25 
per cent. 

Brownell's office summarized 
the results of the survey like this: 

• 49 per cent said they wanted 
Proposition 2Vi to be 
implemented with no changes at 
all. 

• 46 per cent would prefer to 
see economies in service or 
service reductions at the local 
level; 51 per cent want no service 
cutbacks at all. 

• 35 per cent said they feel 
significant savings can be 
achieved in spending for public 
education. 

• 51 per cent would like to see 
some form of user's fee for school 
athletics. 

• 85 per cent said they wanted 
state sDending frozen at the 1981 




THOMAS F. BROWNELL 

level and the savings returned to 
the cities and towns. 

The survey also indicated a lot 
of constituent dissatisfaction with 
state programs. 

• 72.5 per cent said they were 
in favor of curtailment of 
spending for welfare. 

• 47.5 per cent called for cut- 
backs in the state university and 
community college system. 

Respondents in the poll also 
were against any new taxes to 
replace funds lost by the limits 
placed on the property tax levy. 

• 42.5 per cent gave their 
support for user fees for 
municipal services. 

• 36 per cent preferred a local 
room and meals tax. 

• 30 per cent said they 
supported a broadening of the 
sales tax, that is, taxing items not 
now taxed. 

• 27.5 per cent leaned toward 
some form of graduated income 
tax. 

• Only 10 per cent said they 
would favor an increase in the 
state income tax. 



"Clearly," said Brownell, 
"this survey indicates strong 
objections to the imposition of any 
new taxes. 

"The citizens of Ouincy have 
expressed their belief in tax 
reform, and as a ranking member 
of the House Taxation Com- 
mittee, 1 will carry the message 
forth." 

He said he intends to distribute 
the results of the survey to 
members of the Joint Taxation 
Committee and also to the Massa- 
chusetts Taxpayers Foundation 
and Citizens for Limited Taxation. 

Although nearly half of those in 
the survey said they wanted no 
changes in Prop 2'/2, there were 
those who expressed a desire for 
constructive modifications. 

• 36 per cent said they would 
like to see allowance made for an 
inflation factor after 2'/2 is 
implemented fully. 

• 12.5 per cent thought that 
municipal energy costs should be 
exempted from the property tax 
limitations. 

• 20 per cent would change the 
time frame in which 2'/2 is to be 
implemented fully from three to 
five years. 

• Only 4 per cent said they 
favored transferring the authority 
to override the provisions of Prop 
2'/j from the voters to the local 
government body. 

"The voters ot yuincy 
responded to this survey with a 
great deal of responsibility and 
genuine analytical thought," said 
Brownell. 

"Tax policy questions on Prop 
2Vi are at best complicated and 
the respondents were quite aware 
of which changes would cut the 
intent of Prop 2Vi and which 
would effectuate a fine-tuning to 
make property tax limitation a 
lasting policy." 



Cerasoli Drug Bill Nears Passage 



A bill filed by Rep. Robert A. 
Cerasoli that would set stiff 
penalties for the sale of drug 
paraphernalia is on the verge of 
becoming law. 

The bill went to a third reading 
in the House Monday and Cerasoli 
said it has a good chance of passing 
within a week. 

It calls for a mandatory sentence 
of up to two years in jail and a 
$ 1 ,000 fine for anyone convicted of 
selling drug paraphernalia with the 
intent to use it with illicit drugs. 

Sale to minors calls for a 
mandatory sentence of up to five 
years and a $5,000 fine. 

Cerasoli said his bill is based on 
a model drug paraphernalia act 
drafted by the U.S. government, 
which has been upheld in 1 1 



federal district courts and two 
appellate courts. 

The model act has been adopted 
in whole or in part in 19 states. 

Drug paraphernalia is identified 
as including certain kinds of 
rolling papers, roach clips, coke 
spoons, free-base kits and bongs. 

To demonstrate what he means, 
Cerasoli dropped by the Sun office 
the other day with a collection of 
objects people are using these days 
to get high. 

They included: 

• A type of frisbee called a 
"buzz.bee," which has a metal cup 
and tube in the center in which to 
burn marijuana. It can be tossed 
around literally among smokers. It 
costs $7.95. 

• A plastic gun, called a "power 



hitter." The cigarette is placed 
inside, lit and the smoke is pumped 
out of the barrel into the smoker's 
mouth. 

• A forked pipe with two tubes 
that can be stuck to the dash board 
of the car with a suction cup and 
used by two smokers, including the 
driver, as they motor down the 
street. 

"These items have no legal uses," 
said Cerasoli. "But they are not in 
themselves illegal. My bill will 
close that loophole." 

Particularly insidious, he said, is 
the fact that many of these articles 
are sold in Christmas stockings, 
which has a tremendous appeal to 
youngsters. 

"It looks like it's good for you, 
but it is not good for you," said 
Cerasoli. 




Quincy 's 
Yesterdays 

By Tom Henshaw 




July 2-8, 

1951 

30 Years Ago 
This Week 



War Hero Dog 

Star At 175th 

Fourth Here 

Marine Cpl. Derek, a Doberman pinschcr who saw action in 
World War II on Guadalcanal and Pelilieu, was the star of the 
Fourth of July festivities at Merry mount Beach. 

Residents of Snug Harbor celebrated 
their first Independence Day in their new 
homes with a full day of activities for kids 
and a block party at Palmer St. and 
I al frail Rd.. music by led Brown's 
orchestra. 

Elsewhere in the city on the 175th 
birthday of the United States: 

Atlantic youngsters ate 2,200 ice cream cones and drank 1,200 
bottles of soda pop at Welcome Young Field and there were eight 
ponies and a merry-go-round for riding at Bishop Field, 
Montclair. 

William C. Russell, commander of the Quincy Veterans 
Council, was the speaker at Squantum and the championship St. 
Josephs Cadets drill team performed at Fore River Field, Quincy 
Point. 

SCHOOLS APPROVED 

City Manager William J. Deegan, Jr. announced that the 
National Production Administration had given approval to a 
proposed elementary school in (iermantown and an addition to 
Quincy Trade School. 

Contractor S and A Co. of Boston immediately began 
construction of the (iermantown School under a $5S7,0OO 
contract but the Trade School addition had not yet been 
advertised for bids. 

MORRISKTTK WINS 

The Morrisette Junior Legion baseball team came up with 
seven runs in the eighth and final inning to defeat Milton, 9-4, and 
win its seventh straight Zone Six victory. 

Morrisette lineup: Barone 3b. Precioso cl. Twomey lb. 
DePaulo If. Hebert ss. Durante 2b. Volpe rf. Thrower c. Collins p. 
SPEBSQSA ON ROAD 

Members of the Quincy Chapter of the Society for the 
Preservation and Encouragment of Barber Shop Quartet Singing 
in America, Inc., were guests of the Belmont Chapter for an 
evening of song. 

Members included Thomas Sheehan, Denis Shea, Frank 
Sheehan. William Childs Jr., Joseph McDonough, Russell 
Nickerson. Edward Graves. Fred Manning. Richard Hart. Al 
Abel, Gene LeBlanc and Charles Ready. 

Ql INCY-ISMS 

Costan/o Pagnano of 94 Phipps St. Quincy Center, took over 
the office of president of the Granite Cutters International 
Association, the first Quincy man to hold the post despite the fact 
that its headquarters had been at 25 School St. for the past 40 
years. . . PIcC. John Caruso, son of Mr. and Mrs. John J. Caruso. 
21 Berry St., Quincy Point, celebrated his 23rd birthday wiin me 
Second Infantry Division in Korea. . . The Board of Delegates of 
the Independent Union of Fore River Workers suspended 
President Kimball Sturtevant because of his opposition to 
affiliation with theCIO Shipbuilding Workers. . . Sen. Charles W. 
Hedges met with ousted Gen. Douglas MacArthur in New York 
to urge him to visit Quincy during his trip to Boston at the end of 
the month. . . Phil Maloney defeated Bill McKen/ie. 6-2. 6-2. to 
win the Lobster Tournament at the Quincy Tennis Club. . . 
Hamburger was 65 cents a pound at the Granite Public Market on 
Independence Ave. . . Gerard E. Reed of 22 Hobomack Rd., 
Merrymount, was named chiel accountant at Northeast Airlines. . 
. City Councillor Amelio Delia Chiesa was the first to file 
nomination papers for re-election to the city's second- Plan E 
Council. . . Funeral services were held at First Parish Church for 
Mrs. Minnie Morton Burgin. mother of Mayor Thomas S. 
Burgin, who died at her home, 131 Monroe Rd.. at the age ol 82. . . 
Former Police Chief John J. Avery, 66. ol 33 Upland Rd.. was in 
critical condition at City Hospital with an internal ailment. . . Al 
Collins pitched a five inning no-hitter as the Morrisette Junior 
Legion baseball team whipped Quincy. 6-0. . . "Mister SS0." 
starring Burt Lancaster and Dorothy Maguire. and "North of the 
(jreat Divide." with Rov Rogers, was playing al the Lincoln 
Theater. . .The Governor's Council was aw ailing the appointment 
by Gov. Paul A. Deverof a successor to Lawrence W. Lyons as 
clerk of Quincy District Court. . . Alter a year and a hall in 
Quincy. City Manager Deegan purchased a home at 1 15 Forbes 
Hill Rd. . . Clement A. O'Brien ol North Quincy was appointed 
district deputy of the State Council. Knights of Columbus. . . A 
two-family house on Green leaf St. with a two-car garage was lor 
sale at $14,700 through Flavin and Flavin. 1601 Hancock St. . . 
The School Committee voted to raise the pay o! principals h) 
S200. giving elementary school heads boosts from $5,400 to 
S5.600. . . (apt. Harry Sartoris. who began his naval eareci as an 
ensign at Squantum in 1927. returned as commander o\ the air 
station. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 1981 



Fashion Show Aids Cerebral Palsy 




THE MOTHER'S COMMITTEE of Cerebral 

Palsy of the South Shore \rea recently 
sponsored a dinner and fashion shoie at Sons of 
Italy lodge. Quincy. Lucille Jones was among 
thate modeling Jashions. 

(Quinc> Sun PhotiK hs Rnk Matlhetts] 



MODELING FASHIONS at the recent dinner 
and fashion show sponsored />v the Mother's 
Committee of Cerebral Palsy of the South 
Shore Area uas tbby Conneelw Miss Ireland of 
1980. The event uas held at the Sums of Italy 
Social Center. Quincy. 



Debra A vies 
Receives Degree 

Debra Jean Ayles of 140 
Summit Ave., Wollaston, was 
awarded a degree in English at 
the recent 176th commencement 
at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, 
Maine. 



Births 



Valerie 
337-8057 



Jane 
447-6344 



A New Dimension 
in Readings 

Parties In Your Home 
Private Readings By Appointment 

Cards • Tarol • Jewelry 
Tea Leaves • Crystal Ball 



June 21 

Mr. and Mrs. William Panora 
(Deborah Laneau), 300 Green St., 
North Weymouth, a daughter. 

June 22 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Fabrizio 
(Loretta Gillespie), 78 Doane St., 
Apt. #3., Quincy. a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Costagliola (Margaret Young), 34 
Shoreham St., North Quincy, a 
daughter. 







&&*!* 



6he> ov ~ ;M 



Senior Citizens Discount 



'-•.•••■ ••••: 



•.•.•.•.•-•.•.•.■ 



& m 



>.•-■ ■-•.■ 



Closed Mondays 

Open Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 A.M. - 5:30 P.M. 

Open Thurs. eves 'til 8:30 



773-5266 



VISA' 



Mr. and Mrs. Edward Phillips 
(Alice Grant), 465 Newport Ave., 
Wollaston, a son. 

June 23 

Mr. and Mrs. William Wells 
(Theresa DclPico), 39 Hoover 
Ave., Braintree, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Wojcik 
(Bonnie Perkins). 86 Hamilton St.. 
Wollaston. a son. 

June 24 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Patrick Mallov 
(Kathleen Casey), 82G Centre St.. 
Quincy. a daughter. 



ELECTROLYSIS 



UNWANTED HAIR 

PERMANENTLY 

REMOVED 

Face, Eyebrows, 
Body, Legs, Hairline 

Dolores MacMillon, R.E. 

680 Hancock St., Wollaston 

Office hours by appointment 
Complimentary consultation available 

471-9500 or 471-0214 




ENGAGED - Mrs. Loretta 
Hagan of 132 Clay St., 
Wollaston, announces the 
engagement of her daughter, 
Janice Anne, to Dennis M. 
Grappi, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Sergio Grappi of Lynn. Miss 
Hagan, also the daughter of the 
late Mr. William Hagan, is a 
graduate of Archbishop Williams 
High School and Aquinas Junior 
College. She is employed as a 
secretary. Mr. Grappi, a graduate 
of St. Mary 's High School, Lynn, 
and Suffolk University, is 
employed as a carpenter. An 
Aug. 22, wedding is planned. 

[Miller Studio) 



ENGAGED -- Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph A. Cristiani of 75 Pontiac 
Rd., Merry mount, announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Angelina Marie, to Ronald J. 
Moscato, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph D. Moscato of 9 Hadley 
St., Medford. Miss Cristiani, a 
graduate of Quincy High School 
and Boston State College, is 
employed as a youth counselor 
in Quincy. Mr. Moscato, a 
graduate of Medford High 
School and Westfield State 
College, received a master's 
degree from Boston University. 
He is attending Babson College, 
Wellesley, and is a teacher at 
MCI, Concord. An Aug. 29, 
wedding is planned. 

(Pagar Studios) 



QHS Class Of 1961 
Planning Oct. 24 Reunion 



The Quincy High School class 
of 1961 will celebrate its 20th 
reunion Oct. 24. 1981 at 6:30 p.m. 
at the Lantana, Randolph. 

A number of classmates have 
not been located. Anyone having 
information about them is asked 
to contact Fran (Contrino) Foy, 63 
Goddard St., Quincy, Joan 
(Avitable) Bicchieri, 37 Hobart 
St., Braintree, or Marie (Currari) 
Rooney, 38 Scituate Ave., 
Scituate. 

The "missing" classmates are: 

Earl A. Anderson Jr., Andrew 
Backman, Virginia R. Barco, 
Cynthia Blaisdell. Ellen 

Brodzinski, Barbara Bronstein, 
Virginia Clark, Samuel Cohen, 
Jerome Connelly, Earl Crandall, 
Robert Crandell, Judith Cushing, 
Delia DeCesarc, Ronald Ekbom, 
Donald Fennelly, Lawrence 
Goldman. Robert A. Goodman, 
Carol (Ciornstein) Harris, Arthur 
Grant. Jeanne (Haddix) Splaine, 
Barry Hanson, George 

Harrington. John Hayes, Eugene 



Hcalcy, Frank Hensley. Deborah 
(Hallon) Right, Barbara 

V :i">'nvm> Green. 

Robert Kelsey, Catherine 
King. Philip Knight. Michael 
Lear, Richard Leavitt, Edward 
Lewis, Thomas Lydon, Kenneth 
MacDonald, Richard MacDonald, 
Thomas MacKay, Sandra Malley, 
Elaine (Mancil) White, Marie 
(Mann) Abdullah, Joan 

McDonald, John W. McKinnon, 
Joseph McLaughlin, William F. 
Miller, William Mullen, Walter 
R. Murphy, Thomas H. Noonan, 
William O'Connell. Bradford 
Olsen, Walter O'Meara, Edward 
A. Page, Gerald J. Perrota, John 
D. Phillips, Beverly (Pollara) 
Thomas, Elaine Randall, Thomas 
Rowe, Jeff Silverman, Barry 
Smith, Charles Spearing, Richard 
Spence, Edmund Steigman, 
Karen (Steiner) Wenneberg, 
Karin (Stenerud) Quirk, Marion 
Sullivan, William Walenius, 
William Walsh, Richard Watson, 
John Watts. 



Mr., Mrs. Dennis J. Bertoni 
Parents Of Daughter 



Mr. and Mrs. Dennis J. Bertoni 
of 30 Charlesmount Ave., Quincy 
Point, are parents of a daughter, 
Danielle Marie, their first child, 
born May 26, at Quincy City 
Hospital. 



Mrs. Bertoni is the former 
Marie Pimentel. 

Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter V. Pimentel of Quincy; 
and Mr. and Mrs. Harold P. 
Bertoni of West Quincy. 



Marianne Walter Receives Degree 



Marianne E. Walter, of Quincy, 
received an Associate in Science 



Guys & Gals 

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Blow Cut 

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At a price you can afford 
Inoludes cut, shampoo, 
creme rinse, styling 
Mo appointment necessary - just come on in! 



$] 2 



/iff Q jT V £ / Mastercharge - Visa Accepted 

parking in R M r of shop 5 Cottage Ave., Quincy 

472-9681 



Hours: 8:30-600 Daily 
Thurs. & Fri. til 9 



degree at the recent commence- 
ment at Endicott College, Beverly. 

Miss Walter has completed off- 
campus work experience in radio- 
television, her major field of study, 
during the regular college 
internship period. 



Attorney Services 

ALAN H. SEGAL 

328-6545 
848-6272 



175 Quincy Shore 
Drive, Oulncy 
400 Franklin St., 
Braintree 



General Practice 

Criminal & Family Law 

Personal Injury Claims 

Real Estate 

Wills & Trusts 

NO CHARGE FOR FIRST 
OFFICE VISIT 




GOU)K\ MILESTONE — Mr. and Mrs. U alter Ui^in'of 1000 
Stnilhrrn Arl fry, Quincy were guests of honor recently at a liOlh 
anniccrsary cclchraiion n'tccn by their family. 

Mr., Mrs. Walter Wiggin 
Celebrate 50th Anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Wiggin of 1000 Southern 
Artery, Quincy, recently 
celebrated their 50th wedding 
anniversary at surprise party 
given by their family and held 
at Bobby Hackett's Res- 
taurant, Pembroke. 

Many relatives and friends 
attended the celebration 
including the original flower 
girl, Mrs. Audrey Fisher of 
New York and the maid of 
honor, Mrs. Bella F. Aitken of 
Braintree, sister of Mrs. 
Wiggin. 

The Wiggins were married 
June 17, 1931, at the home of 



Mrs. Wiggin's brother, the 
late Mr. George Stevens, of 
Edgemere Rd., Quincy 
Center. 

Mrs. Wiggin is the former 
Alice Stevens of Quincy. 

Mr. Wiggin was employed 
by Daniel Brown Realtors of 
Braintree until his retirement, 
four years ago. 

Both are members of the 
Quincy chapter of the Order of 
the Eastern Star. 

The Wiggins, who have also 
been residents of Centerville 
and Weymouth, have lived at 
1000 Southern Artery for three 
years. 



Vickie Brunson Engaged 
To William E. Mathews 



Mr. and Mrs. Clayton C. 
Brunson of Fayetteville, Ark., 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Vickie Ann, to 
William E. Mathews, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter D. Mathews of 
North Quincy. 

Miss Brunson is a 1979 
graduate of the University of 



Arkansas with a bachelor's 
degree in elementary education. 

Mr. Mathews is also a graduate 
of the University of Arkansas with 
bachelor's and master's degrees 
in business administration. 

A July 11, wedding is planned 



at First 
Fayetteville. 



Baptist Church, 



Quincy Woman's Club 
Plans Social, Card Party 



Mrs. Theodore Buker first vice- 
president announces the next 
social and card party of the 
Quincy Women's Club will be 
Tuesday, July 7 at 12:30 p.m. at 
the clubhouse. 148 Presidents 
Lane, Quincy. 

Mrs. Richard W. Forrest and 
Mrs. Alan C. Heath are co- 
chairmen assisted by Mrs. Roger 
Goulet. Mrs. Charles LeVine. 
President, Mrs. William Lutes, 
Miss Helena F. McCormick and 
Mrs. Ruth Webb. 

Refreshments will be served. 
There will be a prize for each 



The Florist 



389 Hancock St. 
Quincy 

3283959 

Since 1900 



table. All proceeds will go to the 
club's general fund. 

The event is open to the public. 
The next party will be Tuesday, 
July 21 , at the clubhouse. 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley F. Spink Sr. of Quincy 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Susan, to William 
J. Johnston, son of Mrs. Patricia 
Johnston of Wollaston and Mr. 
William F. Johnston of Milton. 
Miss Spink, a graduate of Quincy 
High School, is employed by 
Quincy Savings Bank. Mr. 
Johnston, a graduate of North 
Quincy High School and Quincy 
Vo-Tech, is employed by Clark, 
Franklin, Kingston Press, 
Westwood. A June, 1982 
wedding is planned. 

(Miller Studio] 



Social 



La Leche League 
To Hold Picnic 

La Leche League, celebrating its 
25th anniversary this year, will 
hold a picnic Saturday, July 11,10 
a.m. to 3 p.m. at Curry College, 
Blue Hill Ave., Milton. 

All past and present league 
members are invited. Participants 
are to bring their own supplies. 

Summer Whist Parties 
At HN Congregational 

The Mother's Club of Houghs 
Neck Congregational Church will 
hold summer whist parties 
Mondays July 13 and 27, and 
Aug. 10 and 24, at 8 p.m. 

The public is invited. 

Rosanne (VHare 
Villanova Graduate 

Rosanne G. O'Hare of 56 
President's Lane, Quincy Center, 
was recently graduated from 
Villanova University, Pa., with a 
bachelor's degree. 




LOVE IS 




i c 



. a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 

Speak to Tern Stracco - She's our rental agent - 
specializing in complete wedding package plans 
and all other occasions. The Golden Lion Suite 
accommodates up to 300. The Venetian Room up 
to 150 guests. Give Terr; a call for an appointment 
for >our reservation. New brochures are available, 
(air conditioned) 

(ALL Quincy Sons of Italy Social Center 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy, MA 02169 

NEW NUMBER is 472-5900 



[^Summer Dance* 

June 30 thru Aug 5 

^xancis Osb 0/ . 

773-5436 ° 
o 
'School of Dancing 

Ballet Tap J an 
Adult Children 



DRAPERY 

CLEANING 

PLUS 

Plus Take Down and ReHang in your home or office 

Plus No Shrink written statement 

Plus the finest gentle cleaning and perfection pleating 



CALL 698-8300 



Walk-in dfapery cleaning 
accepted at all locations 



Jpepeixlafile 



Thursday, July 2. 1981 Quincy Sun Page 7 



: 




MR. and MRS. JOHN CARDARELLI 

Angela Peruzzi Bride 
Of John Cardarelli 



Angela Peruzzi and John 
Cardarelli were married recently 
at St. John's Church, Quincy, 
during a double ring ceremony 
performed by Rev. Daniel 
Graham. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Albino Peruzzi of 75 
Endicott St., South Quincy. A 
graduate of Quincy High School 
and the University of Massa- 
chusetts, she is employed by 
Zodiac Travel Agency, 

Burlington. 

The bridegroom, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Emilio Cardarelli of 314 
Montevale Ave., Woburn, is a 
graduate of Northeastern Uni- 
versity and Lowell Technical 
College. He is employed by Wang 
Computer, Chelmsford. 

Maid of honor was Linda 
Peruzzi of Los Angeles, Ca. 
Bridesmaids were Adrienne 
Peruzzi of Quincy; Mary Anne 
Worsman of Billerica; Nancv 



Cardarelli of Woburn; and Carol 
Hilty of Dallas, Tex. 

Best man was Burrell Cohen of 
Los Angeles, Ca. Ushers were 
Vincent Peruzzi and Doug 
Cudworth, both of Quincy; David 
Worsman of Billerica; and Mark 
Demeo of Woburn. 

A reception was held at Sons of 
Italy, Quincy. 

Following a wedding trip to 
California and Las Vegas, the 
newlyweds are making their 
home in Burlington. 



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Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2. 1981 





ELKS EXALTED R ULER David G. Montani, Jr., (left) also presented (from second left) 
student leadership awards to Quincy residents Patricia Morris and Brian Garity, both of 
Archbishop Williams High School, and the Adult Service to Youth Award to Raymond D. 
Dunn. At right is Joseph P. Shea, chairman of the Youth Activities Committee. 

(Quincy Sun Photos fry Have Gillooly) 



NANCY GORMAN (center) of Merrymount, a North Quincy High School student, was 
awarded the Quincy Elks Handicapped Student Scholarship Award of SSOO at recent 
ceremonies at the Elks Home, Quincy Center. From left, are Elks exalted ruler David G. 
Montani, Jr.; past exalted ruler Joseph J. McArdle; Dr. Carol Lee Griffin, director of pupil 
personnel services for the Quincy Public Schools; and Kevin Murphy, scholarship 
Committee Chairman. 



Raymond Dunn Honored 



Elks Present Youth Day Scholarships, Awards 



The Quincy Lodge of Elks 
presented scholarships and 
awards at its "Elks National 
Youth Day" activities recently at 
the Elks Home, Quincy Center. 

The Adult Service to Youth 
Award was presented to 
Raymond D. Dunn. 

Recipient of the Handicapped 
Student Scholarship Award of 
$500 was Nancy Gorman. 

General scholarship awards of 
$200 each were presented to 
Janice Curran, Patricia Gerry, 
Mary MacLean, Susan Mahoney 
and Kathleen McGuire. 

Dr. Carol Lee Griffith, director 
of pupil personnel services for the 
Quincy Public Schools, presented 



Norfolk County 
Bar Association 

Lawyer reference service will 
help in selecting an attorney. 

If you need a lawyer and don't 
know one, call us and you will be 
referred to an attorney in your 
area who will talk to you for a 
nominal fee for the first visit. 

P. O. Box 66, Dedham, Mass. 

326-8699 

Call 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



the scholarships. 

Master of ceremonies for the 
event was Joseph P. Shea, chair- 
man of the Youth Activities 
Committee. Chaplain James 
MacGregor gave the opening and 
closing prayers. 

Organist John N. DiBona 
played the National Anthem and 
"God Bless America". Welcome 
was given by exalted ruler David 
G. Montani. 

Mayor * Arthur H. Tobin 
brought greetings from the city. 
Kevin Murphy assisted with the 
presentation of scholarships. 

Other awards presented sere: 

Art: Greta Gougian, Andrienne 
Stern, Sandy Dwyer, Anna 
Marvsich, Robert Salvaggio, 
Ronald Pettinelli, Ann Rice, 
Kathleen Petrilli, John 

Ricciarelli. 

Music: Joyce Irvine, Errol 
DiBona, Danielle Carbonneau, 
Anthony Quintiliani, James 
Hickey, Joan Fantucchio, Theresa 
Pearson. 

English: Patricia McCue, 
Colleen Hegarty, Helen 

Anderson, Janine MacKinnon, 
Timothy Allen, Richard Miller, 
Donna Marcin, Matthew 
MacLeod. 

Math: Warren Madden, 



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Jeannine MacHon, Mary 
Moreschi, Helen Anderson, 
Jennifer Behm, Donna 

Barkhouse, Donna Malone, John 
Swanton, Richard Miller. 

Science: Patricia McCue, 
Jonathan Mankus, Janine 
MacKinnon, Maura Doherty, 
Joyce Irvine, David Meenan, 
Richard Miller, Catherine 
Shinopulos. 

Foreign Language: Theresa 
Sullivan, Joanne Russo, Janine 
MacKinnon, Lisa Smith, Mavra 
Doherty, Nancy Coleman, Cheryl 
Donovan, Dianna Dawson, 
Jennifer Behn, Katherine 
Harrow, Matthew MacLeod, 
Caterina Iacovangelo, Claudio 
Sala, Sandra Pellicane. 

Industrial Arts and Home- 
making: Christine Keenan, Scott 
Brennan, Claudio Sala, 

Alexander Campbell, Paula 
Morrison. 

Academics and Business: 
Jennifer Behm, Sandra Kelley, 
Staley Cocco, Laura Serafini, 
Lynne Facella, Lorraine Marino. 

Social Studies: Susan Sweeney, 
Jonathan Mankus, Patricia 
McCue, Chris Ivey, Patricia 
Baldassini, Lesa Smith, Robin 
McCluskey, Mary E. MacLean, 
Donna Marcin David Meenan, 
Garreth Mchugh. 

Student Leadership: Patricia 
Morris, Michael Papile, Brian 
Garity, Jean Curtis, Jeanine 
MacKinnon, Timothy Allen, 
Patricia Gerry, Diane Solander, 



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Jeff Neitlich, Roy Hart, Donna 
Thomas. 

Athletics: Bernice Chevalier, 
James O'Toole, Margaret 
Maclssac, Heather Sanger, John 
Buckley, Robyn O'Donnell, 
Maureen McCarthy, Karen 
Kozlowski, Sean Burke, Edward 
MacKay, Michael Coska, Joseph 
McLelland, Scott Matthews, 
Maureen Walsh, Marie Callahan, 
Susan Callahan, Nancy 

Chludzinski. 

Gymnastics: Elizabeth Norton, 
Martin Griffin, Daniel 

McNamara, Maureen McCarthy, 
Maura Doherty, Karen Keeler. 

Radio/TV Repair: John Carty, 
John Christello, David G. 
Orlando. 

Electrical: Joseph A. Cipolla, 
Denis Donaghey, Geoffrey G. 
McGhee. 

Baking: Janet M. Hall, 
Rosemarie Salvatore, Ellisa J. 
Smith. 

Cooking: Mark S. Hubbard, 
Brian J. Burns, Daniel Montani. 

Mill & House Carpentry: Fred 
A. Abdullah, Paul W. Furey. 

Cabinetmaking: Thomas P. 
Keane, Richard J. Lapierre, 
Kenneth Ryan. 

Health Occupation: Patricia M. 
Cullen, Gemma Doody, Marsha 
M. Monti. 

Foundry: George W. Maier, 
James Manolakis, David Guinlan. 

Machine Shop: William F. 
Dever, Timothy Hirtle, Jo Ellen 
Straughn. 

Sheet Metal: James F. O'Neil, 
Robert A. Raimondi, Reed J. 
Vanelli. 

Metal Fabrication: Jay 
McGuinness, Jean M. Murphy, 
Frederick Sousa. 

Auto Body: Michael Avitable, 
David D. Larkin, Kevin M. 



Williams. 
Auto Mechanics: Ian W. 

Bishop, Edward L. Campbell, 
John R. Hawes. 

Graphic Arts: Sandra 

McDonald (N.). 

Commercial Arts: Lis 

Palmariello, Paula E. Peterson. 

Quincy City Hospital Junior 
Volunteers: Andrea Barrett, 
Steve Boutilier, Chris Cefail, 
Janine Curley, Nancy Graham, 
Josephine Gullifa, Susan Hall, 
Terry Hamilton, Sandy Hatsfield, 
Kris Hays, Jean Hickey, Pam 
Hirtle, Cheryl Holmes, Jeanine 
Houle, Kim MacAskill, David 
Marcham, Anne McCarthy, Linda 
McCarthy, Chris McGinnis, 
Pamela Mclntire, Carolyn 
McNamara, Carolyn Mercier, 
Cindy Mitchell, Maureen 
O'Brien, Lisa O'Connell, Suzanne 
Picard. Michael Preble, Richard 
Ragusa, Linda Rhodes, Rebecca 
Sage, Kevin Zanardelli, Kim 
Kramer, Karen Hanrahan. 

David G. Montani is Elks 
exalted ruler. Past exalted ruler is 
Joseph J. McArdle. 

Youth activities committee 
chairman is Joseph P. Shea. 
Martin F. Black, past exalted 
ruler, is co-chairman. 

Committee members were 
Robert Graham, Tom Bamberry, 
Don Hohler, Fred Connolly, John 
J. Chiavaroli, James M. Corbin, 
Kevin V. Murphy, John J. 
Gorman, Robert W. Tufts, Jack 
Raymer, John W. Mahoney, 
Gilman D. Loud, Joseph M. Joy 
and Joseph Grant. 

Participating schools were 
Quincy High School, North 
Quincy High School, Archbishop 
Williams High School, Woodward 
School for Girls and Quincy 
Vocational-Technical School. 



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LIFE • BUSINESS - PERSONAL • AUTO 





Thursday, July 2. 1981 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Applications Available 
For Miss Quincy Bay Pageant 



Applications arc available for 
the annual Miss Quincy Bay 
Beauty Pageant to be held Friday 
evening, July 17, in downtown 
Quincy. 

Open to South Shore single 
girls age 16 and older, the event 
will highlight the annual Sidewalk 
Bazaar July 16, 17 and 18 
sponsored by the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association. 

The pageant will be held at 9:30 
p.m. on a portable boardwalk on 
Hancock St. in front of the 
Hancock Bank. It is co-sponsored 
by the Quincy Center Business 
and Professional Association and 
the Quincy Bay Race Week 



Association. 

Contestants will compete for 
more than $2,000 in prizes and 
the honor of reigning over this 
year's Quincy Bay Race Week 
Aug. 12 - 16. They will be judged 
in evening gowns and swimsuit 
competition and for overall poise. 

Entry forms are available at: 
Bargain Center, Inc.; Bernie's 
Formal Shop; Burger King Corp., 
(3 Quincy restaurants); Burgin 
Platner & Co., Inc.; Clifford's 
Quincy Square Flower Shop; 
Colman's Sporting Goods, Inc.; 
Connie's Snack Shop; Cummings; 
Dunkin' Donuts; Edson Shoe; 
Jason's Luggage & Music Shop; 



Renovations Planned 
At Welcome Young Playground 



A public meeting will be held 
Tuesday, July 7, at 7:30 p.m. at 
the Atlantic Neighborhood Center 
to discuss plans for the fall 
renovation of Welcome Young 



Playground. 

The park revitalization project 
will be funded through the federal 
Community Development Block 
Grant. 



Residents Maine Graduates 



Jacqueline M. Bangs and 
James P. Lahive, both of Quincy, 
were among some 1,600 students 



to receive degrees recently at the 
163rd commencement exercises 
at the University of Maine. 



WANT 
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Premature redemption requires a substantial 
penalty if permission to redeem is granted by 
the bank. All deposits insured in full. 



Kincaide's Furniture; Lerner 
Shops; Marvel Shop; Pewter Pot 
of Mass. Inc.; Phase II Jewelry; 
Presidential Co-operative Bank; 
Q.C.B.P.A.; Quincy Co-operative 
Bank; The Quincy Sun; Quincy 
Savings Bank; Remick's of 
Quincy; Rogers Jewelry Store; 
Ryder's of Quincy; Sawyer's 
Campus Shop; The Shoe Trap; 
Tag's Discount Furniture; and F. 
W. Woolworth Co. 

They are also available at South 
Shore yacht clubs. 

Pageant chairman is Pat Jones, 
assistant to the president at 
Home Town Bank, Newton. 

The three previous pageants 
have drawn more than 90 
contestants from 15 South Shore 
towns into competition for the 
coveted title. 




With the price of gold, silver and diamonds at 

highest (or even declining) levels, now is the 

time to receive the most cash for yours 

We've been serving Quincy and the 
South Shore since 1942. 




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Pa|>e 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 1981 



McDuff Seeks Ward 2 
Seat To Support 2Vz 



John H. McDuff Jr. of 216 
South St., Quincy Point, citing a 
need for "elected leaders who 
will work to make Prop 2'/2 a 
success rather than trying to 
destroy it," has announced his 
candidacy for the City Council 
from Ward 2. 

McDuff, who was a candidate 
for a seat on the School 
Committee in the 1979 election, 
lists himself as a member of 
Citizens for Limited Taxation, the 
organization that spearheaded 
the drive to adopt Proposition 

2'/l. 

"Too many politicians are 
crying about 2Vi and cutting 
police and fire service to frighten 
the public," he charged in his 
announcement. 

"Many of them are in the 
pockets of the special interest 
groups who are out to scuttle 2'/: 
and they have betrayed the 
taxpayers who elected them. 1 will 
work to cut out the fat, not 
essential services." 

McDuff predicted a bright 
future for Quincy, "so long as we 
don't become obsessed with 
office buildings, skyscrapers and 



condominiums to the detriment of 
the homeowner and the small 
businessman. 

"Bigger is not necessarily 
better. We must not allow our city 
to be turned into a miniature 
Boston, with its crime, violence 
and destruction of neighbor- 
hoods. 

"If I am elected I will do my 
best to keep Quincy a city we can 
enjoy living in. 

"I will fight to protect the vital 
interests of the people of Quincy 
Point, both economic and social. 
Ward 2 has a tradition of electing 
high caliber men to office and I 
want to continue that tradition." 

McDuff, 47, is a graduate of 
Emerson College and is a 
supervisor at Brigham and 
Women's Hospital, Boston, 
where he has worked for 19 years. 
He is a member of the Quincy 
Taxpayers Association. Massa- 
chusetts Citizens for Life, the 
Massachusetts Citizens Rights 
Association and the Massa- 
chusetts Conservative Caucus. 

He worked to elect Ronald 
Reagan president in 1980. 



Christmas Festival 
Organizers Named 



General Chairman George F. 
White announces the table of 
organization that will prepare for 
the annual Christmas Festival 
Parade which is scheduled for 
Sunday. Nov. 29, in Quincy 
Center. 

White, who is also budget 
coordinator for the 30-membcr 
festival committee, made the 
following appointments: 

Carol Pisano. activity 

coordinator. 

William Morrill, band coordi- 
nator and parade marshal, 
assisted by Bryant Carter. 

David Kcefe, float coordinator, 
assisted by committee members 
Frances Flynn, Gloria Noble, 
Thomas McDonald, Bernie 
Reisberg, Ginny Ballou and 
School Committeewoman Mary 
Collins. 

Agnes Trillcott, Disney 
costume characters, assisted bv 




Dental 
Corner 

by 
Lee A. Welkj D.M.D. 



Q: My child has difficulty speak- 
ing, and it seems to be due to 
a little piece of skin that's 
attached under his tongue near 
the tip. Can this be corrected? 

A: Yes. The piece of skin is actually 
only a tight muscle attachment, 
or frenum, which keeps the 
tongue from moving properly 
during speech. An oral surgeon 
can do a frenectomy, which re- 
leases the tight muscle and 
allows the tongue to move 
normally. 

Q:l only have one anchor tooth 
on my leftside, but it's broken. 
If I want to have my teeth 
fixed and this tooth is needed, 
how can a dentist get to it if 
part of it is under the gum 1 

A: fie may use electrosurgery , 
which "melts" the extra gum 
tissue away. Healing usually is 
very quick, with little or no 
bleeding or discomfort. 

Presented as a service to the 
community by 



I e< \. WellivD.M.I). 

23 1 Sea Street 
(Juinvy 

479-3030 



Brendan Gallagher and Gene 
Scurti. 

Lts. John Flaherty and Anthony 
Malvesti, police and fire depart- 
ment activities. 
Tom Barry, activity collations. 
Auxiliary Police Chief Anthony 
Siciliano, police auxiliary. 

Remo DcNicola. entertain- 
ment, assisted by Paul Schwabe. 

Richard J. Koch, city liaison, 
Santa's mail boxes and nativity 
pageant. 

Koch and Gloria Noble will 
again co-chair the Christmas 
Poster Contest. 

Edward Holland. ROTC Sea 
Scout activity. 

Bob Noble. parade sign 
coordinator. 

City Councillors Joanne 
Condon and Stephen J. McGrath, 
city activity liaison. 

School Committeewomen Pat 
Toland and Mary Collins, School 
Department activity liaison. 

Paul Schwabe. awards night 
chairman, assisted by Carol 
Pisano. Tom Barry, Helen 
Chatterton and Remo DeNicola. 
Herb Fontaine, publicity. 
Steve Norton, Santa's arrival. 
Joanne Condon, fund-raising 
committee. 



NEWSCARRIERS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



Patrick Conroy Announces 
For School Committee 



Patrick J. Conroy Jr., 24, of 272 
Billings St., North Quincy, has 
announced his candidacy for 
School Committee to fulfill "the 
dire need for competent, 
aggressive and success-oriented 
leadership." 

"For four years, the trademark 
of the Quincy School Committee 
has been failure," charged 
Conroy. 

"They have failed to ade- 
quately manage not only the 
budget but also the physical and 
human resources base which has 
been entrusted to them. 

"Further the School Committee 
has failed miserably to plan 
beyond the present. They have 
refused to accept the challenges 
ofthel980's." 

Conroy, a 1980 graduate of the 
University of Massachusetts, ran 
for School Committee in 1979, 
finishing a strong fourth with 
9,235 votes. In 1977, he failed in a 
bid for Ward 6 councillor. 

Conroy castigated the current 
School Committee for what he 
called its failure to look ahead. 



"Making important decisions 
only in response to a crisis will 
never improve education or 
reduce costs in the long run," he 
said. 

"Yet the only significant 
actions taken by this School 
Committee have been in response 
to crises, and these actions have 
focused on the present and the 
very short-term future." 

"The incumbents have failed to 
clearly articulate the importance 
of quality education, to our 
community and to our nation. 

"At a time when less than half 
the citizens of Quincy have a 
direct interest in the schools, it is 
necessary to re-emphasize that 
good schools make for good 
communities. 

"It is important to remember 
that public schools exist to meet 
the needs of society, and society's 
needs are best met by educated 
and technologically competent 
citizens." 

"The next two years," said 
Conroy, "will be a turning point 
for public education in Quincy. 

"The school system will either 



regain its prominence as an out- 
standing learning institution or it 
will become a caretaking opera- 
tion for children who can't afford 
to pay tuition anywhere else. 

"I believe I can lead the Quincy 
Public Schools toward excellence 
by managing the budget 
efficiently and effectively, 
planning for the needs of edu- 
cation and of society in the 1990's 
and beyond, and making the 
tough and unpopular decisions 
that sometimes need to be made 
for common good. 

"I wish to serve on the School 
Committee in order to return to 
the people of Quincy some of the 
investment they have made in 
me. 

"I believe my intelligence, my 
honesty, and my dedication will 
help mt lead the Quincy Public 
Schools into the next century." 

Conroy, who is employed by 
the Defense Department as a 
contract negotiator, attended the 
Quincy Public Schools, and is 
presently enrolled in the 
Graduate Business School of 
Babson College. 



Koch Stresses Importance 
Of Citizen Participation 



Richard J. Koch, Jr.. candidate 
for Councillor at large, addressed 
a group of campaign workers 
recently at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas G. Bowes of 241 
Newbury Ave., North Quincy, 
stressing the importance of 
citizen participation in municipal 
government on an elective level 
rather than as municipal 
committee appointees. 

Koch congratulated the 
number of new candidates obtain- 
ing nomination papers as 
Councillor at large candidates. He 
suggested others interested join 
in the Democratic process closest 



to the residents, the election of 
mayor, city council and school 
committee. The daily school, 
public safety, water, sewer, 
library, recreation and play- 
ground services are governed by 
local elected officials, he noted. 

Koch said that for too long 
people have been discouraged to 
seek office with segments of the 
news media and political factions 
critical of political office rather 
than the office holders who cause 
the criticism. 

He encouraged young people to 
become part of the political 



process and seek with vigor and 
enthusiasm their goals in public 
service. 

Koch also suggested perse- 
verance to overcome established 
political organizations and well 
financed campaign committees 
with the substitution of personal 
sacrifice, work and dedication to 
offset the seemingly impossible 
task of winning. 

Koch explained his first 
attempt at political office two 
years ago resulted in his being 
runnerup to a former Mayor, 
Joseph LaRaia, by less than 200 
votes. Koch received over 11,000 
votes in the election. 



Morrisette Post Awards $1,700 In Scholarships 



The Morrisette Legion Post, 
West Quincy, recently voted to 
award four scholarship awards 
totalling $1,700. 

Award recipients are: 

David D. Aimola. 41 .lenness 
St., West Quincy, a Quincy High 

Debra Alpert 
Receives Masters Degree 

Debra Alpert, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edwin Alpert of Quincy, 
was among 470 men and women 
awarded degrees at the 213th 
commencement exercises of 
Brown University. She received a 
masters in teaching social 
studies. 



School graduate entering 
Northeastern University. 

Michael J. Ferreira. 95 Harriet 
Ave., Montclair, a North Quincy 
High School graduate entering 
Adelphi University. 



Phillip Mormino. 636 Winter 
Street. East Bridgewater, a 
Bridgewater High School graduate 
entering Cornell University. 

fori Powers. 29 Reardon Street, 
West Quincy, a Font bonne 
Academy graduate, entering 
University of Lowell. 



3 From Quincy 
Receive Tufts Degrees 



Three young men from Quincy 
were among more than 1.500 
graduates who received degrees 
recently during the 125th 
commencement exercises at Tufts 
University in Medford. 



I hey are, Robert F. Fitzpatrick 
Jr., 90 Standish Ave., civil 
engineering; Jon E. Golub, 973 
Furnace Brook Ave., biology; 
Stephen A. Keches, 68 Piermont 
St., mechanical engineering. 



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Thursday, July 2, 1981 Quinry Sun Page II 




MILDRED AMBROSIA (center) was honored as the 1981 "C iti/en of the Year" at the Quincy Citizens 
Association's 14th annual dinner-dance recently at the Quincy Neighborhood Club. From left, are Saul 
Lipsitz, treasurer; Arthur Chandler, president; Mrs. Ambrosia; Dorothy Kelly, secretary; and Joseph 
Ciildea, vice president. 

((fminvy Sun I'hiiht h\ \fvlrin Hurnkl 

3 Mass. Fields Students Energy Contest Winners 



Three students from Massa- 
chusetts Field School, Robert 
Martinopoulos, Brian Keif and 
Brenda McLean, were award 
winners in the April Retrofit 
Month Poster and Theme 
Contest. 

The contest was held to high- 
light the benefits of home energy 



conservation improvements. 

Martinopoulos and Keif won 
third place among statewide fifth 
graders. Miss McLean received 
honorable mention for her poster. 

Entrants from first through the 
sixth grades illustrated examples 
of "Making it Energy Efficient in 
Massachusetts" for the poster 
competition. Entrants from the 



seventh through 12th grades 
submitted themes on the same 
subject. 

Consumers are encouraged to 
obtain information on the 
efficiencies of different heating 
options and conservation methods 
by calling the toll-free Energy 
Phone at 1-800-632-8026. 



See 



SOUTH SHORE 
SAVINGS BANK 



WEy-bANJkJ the 1st 

for 30, 60, 89 day— 

Repurchase Agreements 

High Rate • Guaranteed Return • Fully Secured 

1 5*25 % ° n$5 ' oo ° !:;= > 

Rate as!f July 1,1981 for 30-89 days 

Subject to daily change. 

The Repurchase Agreement is not a savings account or deposit and therefore is not insured by the Deposit 
Insurance Fund of Massachusetts. However, it is secured by United States Treasury or Agency securities in our 
portfolio. 

'Annual Percentage Rale Weymouth Savings Bank reserves the right to modify or terminate this offer at anytime Redemption prior to maturity are 
not allowed interest will not be paid beyond the maturity date of the agreement Interest is calculated on a 365 day year, is payable to maturity and is 
not compounded Individuals investing in Repurchase Agreements should consult their tax advisor 

f Call tod ay for latest rate. J 
We Will Be Closed For The Holidoy 

Sat., July 4th 

But our Girl Friday 

Automated Teller 

Machines Are Open 

Our automated teller machines 
are open 7 days a week, 24 hours 
a day . . . apply now for your card. 



Robert Clifford Honored 
For Volunteer Work 



Robert Clifford of 38 Warwick 
St., North Quincy, has been 
honored for outstanding service 
in contributing 675 hours of 
volunteer service to the Family 
Service Association of Greater 
Boston. 

Mrs. Vivian Greeman. director 
of volunteers, presented the 
award, which cited Clifford for 



"the caring and dedication which 
has characterized his involve- 
ment" during National Volunteer 
Week. 

Clifford also received a special 
award from the Voluntary Action 
Center of the United Way of 
Massachusetts Bay for his work 
as a Big Brother to a 12-year-old 
dyslexic boy from a deprived 
family. 



Robert Wheeler Merrimaek Graduate 



Robert F. Wheeler Jr. of 51 
Forum Rd., South Quincy, was 
among 535 students who received 



degrees recently at the 31st 
commencement of Merrimack 
College in North Andover. 



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BIRD $1Q95 

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white, brown, green, butt 



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Take St. Ann • Road which It oppotll* the malngalt lo Veteran a Stadium 

Open 7 Days — These cash n' .carry prices good thru Sunday 



I 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, Jul) 2, 1981 



Obituaries 



Lucie Spieer, 77, 
Ledger Ad Manager 



Funeral services were held 
Sunday for Lucie A. Spicer. 77, 
retired classified advertising 
manager of the Patriot Ledger, 
who died Friday at Citv Hospital. 

The Rev. William Underhill of 
St. Chrysostom's Church 
officiated at the services at 
Wickens and Troupe Funeral 
Home. 

A native of Norwich, Conn., she 
started working at the Patriot 
Ledger in 1927 and at one time 
held the dual role of advertising 
manager and company auditor 
before her retirement in 1972. 

She was the newspaper's first 
female advertising manager. 

A graduate of Becker's Business 
College and the New England 
Conservatory of Music, she 
worked at the Worcester Telegram 
before moving to Quincy 54 years 
ago. 

She was a member of the 
International Classified Managers 
Association, the Northeast 
Classified Advertising Manage- 
ment Association, a director of the 
Quincy Credit Asssociation and a 




LUCIE A. SPICER 

member of the Newspaper 
Controllers Association. 

Burial was in Mt. Wollaston 
Cemetery. 



Joseph A. Facella, Retired 
Western Electric Employee 



Funeral services for Joseph A. 
Facella of Quincy, a retired 
employee of Western Electric in 
Watertown, were conducted 
Monday at Wickens & Troupe 
Funeral Home. 26 Adams St. 

Mr. Facella died June 25, at 
Quincy City Hospital after being 
stricken at his home with an 
apparent heart attack. 

A World War II Army veteran, 
he had lived in Quincy for 15 
vears. 




Born in New York City, he had 
also lived in Dorchester. 

Mr. Facella was a member of 
Covenant Congregational 

Church, Quincy, and the 
Bethesda Lodge of Odd Fellows. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Joyce Y. (Stevens) Facella; a son, 
Mark D. Facella; three 
daughters, Lynne M. Facella and 
Lori Ann Facella, both of Quincy, 
and Barbara Harrington of 
Florida; a brother, Anthony 
Facella of South Weymouth; two 
sisters, Josephine Piermatteo of 
Florida and Anna Facella of South 
Boston; and four grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Contributions can be made to 
the Memorial Fund of Covenant 
Congregational Church, 315 
Whitwell St., Quincy. 



Card 



Medicaid 
holders' 



Trials 



773-0900 

Robert Karat 

Certified Hearing 
Aid AwdiologUt 



MEMORIAL 






GIFTS 



>, Luiu nous vestments alia' 
\ books candles stoles 
saced vessels etc 



AM Memorial grit? promptly 
memonalfed *itrout charge 

A. E. GOODHUE CO. 

13'5 School St., Quincy. 472-3090 



Louis S. Belyea, 2 1 /2, 
Germantown Drowning Victim 



A prayer service for Louis S. 
Belyea, Jr., 2Vi of Quincy, who 
drowned Saturday off Palmer 
Street Beach, Germantown, was 
held yesterday (Wednesday) at 
Scally Funeral Home, 54 Pleasant 
St., Dorchester. 

Mrs. Kathleen M. Belyea, of 
Doane St., told police she had 
taken Louis with her to visit a 



friend, Terry Marchetti of 391 
Palmer St., Saturday evening. 

Mrs. Marchetti's son, Derryn, 3, 
and Louis played on the beach, 
until Louis wandered into the 
shallow water. 

Reported missing, the child's 
body was found floating in the 
water by neighborhood youngsters 
Jimmy Fidler, 9, Jimmy Cross, 13, 
and Fred Prendable, 12. 



Attempts by police and others at 
the scene failed to revive the child. 
Doctors at Quincy City Hospital, 
where Louis was taken by 
ambulance, tried unsuccessfully 
for 30 minutes to revive him. 

Louis was the brother of 
Kathleen M. and Robert S. 
Belyea, both of Quincy. 

Burial was in Mt. Benedict 
Cemetery. 



Francis X. DiNatale, Retired 
Floor Company Executive 



A funeral Mass for Francis X. 
DiNatale of Quincy, retired vice 
president of DiNatale Floor 
Covering Company, Dorchester, 
was held Saturday at St. Agatha's 
Church, Milton. 

Mr. DiNatale died June 24, in 
Quincy City Hospital. 

He had lived in Quincy for 40 
years. 

Born in Boston, he was 



educated in Boston schools and 
also attended Tufts University. 

Mr. DiNatale was a member of 
the Pere Marquet Council 
Knights of Columbus, South 
Boston, and the Holy Name 
Society, St. Agatha's Church, 
Milton. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Helen C. (Struzik) DiNatale; a 
son, Francis S. DiNatale of 
Braintree; three daughters, Mrs. 



Paul (Dorothy) Fraser of 
Wollaston, Mrs. Thomas (Helen) 
Kelly of Duxbury and Marianne 
Kast of Lexington; two brothers, 
Anthony DiNatale of Braintree 
and Matthew DiNatale of South 
Boston; nine grandchilren and a 
cousin, Dr. Peter DiNatale of 
Milton. 

Burial was in St. Michael's 
Cemetery, Jamaica Plain. 



Cesareo D. Pena, 85, Retired Granite Cutter 



A funeral service for Cesareo 
D. Pena, 85, of Quincy, a retired 
granite cutter, was held 
Wednesday at Sweeney Brothers 
Funeral Home, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Mr. Pena died June 28, in 
Quincy City Hospital after a brief 
illness. 

He had lived in Quincy for 65 
years. 



Deaths 



Blanche J. (So?/i) McKee. 84. of 
Quincy, in Quincv Citv Hospital. June 
27. 

Mabel I, (Downing) Dunlea- 
O'Donnell, 78, of Quincy. in Quincy 
City Hospital. June 27. 

John J. Kreckie. 63. of Braintree, 
formerly of Quincy. in Quincy City 
Hospital. June 27. 

Donna M. Bingham, of Quincy. 
June 27 

Ruth E. (Kalberg) Doyle, of Quincv. 
June 28. 

Bowman C. Wingard of Locke Lake. 
Barnstead. N.H.. formerly of Quincy. 
June 27. 

Roscoe A. Mallar. 77. of Granby. 
formerly of Quincy. in Holyoke 
Hospital, June 19. 

Edmund C. Mowe. 67. of Quincy, at 
home. June 25. 

Rose E. (l.oPilato) Anastasia. 74. of 
Amherst, formerly of Houghs Neck, at 
Cool ey- Dickenson Hospital, 
Northampton, June 24. 

Laurence G. French. 89, of Wellfleet. 
formerly of Quincy. at Cape Cod 
Hospital, June 24. 





uieeneg Kumtnl ^ztmtt 



DENNIS S. SWEENEY, Director 
Non Sectarian 






74 I IM S! 
QUINC Y 

773-2728 



32ft COPHL AND 
VV. QUINCY 

773-2728 



Successor t<> M Joseph Sweeney 



PAKKI\(. I AMI III! S 






Born in Boo, Spain, he worked 
as a granite cutter until retiring 
20 years ago. 

Husband of the late Mrs. Maria 
(Gomez) Pena, he is survived by a 
daughter, Mary N. Cumming of 
Braintree; three sons, Cesareo Jr. 
of Geneva, N.Y., Joseph M. Pena 
of Braintree and Augustine E. 
Pena of Euclid, Ohio; a brother, 
Juan Pena of Santander, Spain; 



14 greandchildren; and three 
great grandchildren. 

Rev. Robert Duncan, pastor of 
Ft. Square United Presbyterian 
Church, officiated at the funeral 
service. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Donations may be made to the 
American Cancer Society, 47 
West Elm St., Brockton. 



John L. Fallon, Jr., 85, 



Retired E 



A funeral Mass for John L. 
Fallon Sr., 85, a lifelong Quincy 
resident, was held Saturday at St. 
Mary's Church, West Quincy. 

Mr. Fallon died June 25, at 
Quincy City Hospital after a brief 
illness. 

He was a retired engineer at 
Bethlehem Steel Company, 
Quincy. 

Husband of the late Mrs. 



ngmeer 

Rachel (Townsend) Fallon, he is 
survived by three sons, Arthur F. 
Fallon and Peter Fallon, both of 
Quincy, and John L. Fallon Jr., of 
Arlington, Va.; and three 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were by 
Joseph Sweeney Funeral Home, 
326 Copeland St. , West Quincy. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 



Ruth H. Nickerson, 63, 
Lifelong Resident 



Funeral services for Ruth H. 
Nickerson, 63, a lifelong Quincy 
resident who had worked for 
Harrison Publishing House, 
Quincy, until recently, were held 
Tuesday at Wickens & Troupe 
Funeral Home. 



Miss Nickerson died June 26, 
at Quincy City Hospital after a 
short illness. 

She was a member of Bethany 
Congregational Church, Quincy. 

There are no known survivors. 

Burial was in Mt. Wollaston 
Cemetery. 



Mrs. Mary J. Jones, 72, 
In Clearwater, Fla. 



Mrs. Mary J. (Howlett) Jones 
died June 23 in Clearwater, Fla., 
at the age of 72. She was the 
sister of Mrs. Agnes Malvesti of 
Quincy. 

A native of Boston, and the 
widow of the late Herbert F. 
Jones, she made her home in 
Florida for the past 25 years. 



In addition to Mrs. Malvesti, 
she leaves her son, Herbert P. 
Jones of Valparaiso, Fla., a 
daughter, Mrs. Margaret Stewart 
of Clearwater, a sister, Mrs. 
Anna Countway of Dedham, and 
five grandchildren. 

She was buried in Sylvan 
Abbey, Clearwater. 



*0&% 



Seuiare 



FUNERAL HOME and CHAPELS 




Donald M. Dewarp 

Director 



576 Hancock Street, Quincy 
Tel: 472-1 137 

Non Sectarian 

Services rendered to any distance 

39 yeais under same Ownership and Directorship 



Thursday, July 2, 1981 Quincy Sun Page I J 



11 Young Mothers Receive 
Diplomas At Bethany Ceremonies 



Dennis Ryan To Head 
Raymondi Committee 



Eleven young mothers recently 
received Quincy High School 
diplomas in a brief ceremony free 
of pomp and circumstance 
Monday evening. 

What the special commence- 
ment in the Allen Parlour of 
Bethany Church lacked in 
magnificence, it made up in 
family style closeness. 

It was the second annual 
graduation from the Bethany 
Teen Mother's Program, which 
started three years ago. About 60 
people were present, including 



School Supt. Dr. Lawrence P. 
Creedon. School Committee 
members Christopher Kennedy, 
Patricia Toland, Mary Collins and 
John J. Sullivan. The opening 
blessing was given by Rev. J. 
William Arnold of Bethany 
Church. The closing benediction 
was offered by Father William 
McCarthy of St. John's Church. 
Dr. Carol Lee Griffin, director of 
pupil personnel services, gave the 
welcome. 

Dr. Creedon told the group that 
the Bethany Program will 
continue next year because of 



community and state support. 

City funding for the program 
was cut months ago during the 
school budget slashing process 
required by Prop 2Vi. 

But an imminent $25,000 state 
grant will help keep the program 
alive another year, Dr. Creedon 
said. He said the teen mother 
program has the support of state 
officials, especially Dr. David 
Cronin, assistant commissioner of 
education. 

The program has also received 
a $2,000 pledge from Hingham 
Congregational Church. 



Squantum Church Begins 
Summer Sermon Series 



A series of summer sermons on 
the Book of Revelation began last 
Sunday at the First Church of 
Squantum. 

The pastor, Rev. Dr. Gene 
Langevin, preached on, "Can This 
Book Be For Us?" 

The series will continue 
throughout the summer, except for 
a few weeks in August when Dr. 
Langevin will be away. It will deal 
with the issues raised by the visions 



John the Seer had of things which 
were to come while he was 
imprisoned on the Isle of Patrons 
in the first century. 

The issues broadly speaking, are 
"eschatological" meaning they 
refer to the end of time. 

Greeters for the morning were 
Gloria Cutler and Doris Sinckler. 
Violinist James E. Sumner played 
Handel's "Sarabande"asa prelude 
to the service and Tartini's 



"Adagio in G" as the offertory. 

He was accompanied by Mary 
Ruth Scott on the organ. 

Members of the youth choir 
were presented choir pins by Mary 
Ruth Scott who directs the choir. 

The Fellowship Hour after the 
service was hosted by Steve 
Williams and Bonnie Adams. 

All summer services at the First 
Church of Squantum will begin at 
9:15 a.m. until September. 



Vacation Bible School At St. John's 



St. John's Church, Quincy 
Center, has invited parents and 
parishioners to view a slide 
presentation tonight (Thursday) at 
7:30 p.m. on the Church's first 
Vacation Bible School being held 
this week. 



Those attending can also see 
crafts made by the children and 
enjoy a program of music by the 
children led by Julie DiScipio. 

One hundred children are 
participating in the activities which 
consist of crafts, music, Bible 
stories, recreation, snack time and 



a missionary outreach. 

About 35 adults have 
volunteered their services as 
teachers and aides under the 
direction of Carol Horn, program 
director, and Rev. William R. 
McCarthy, spiritual director and 
advisor to the staff. 



Dennis F. Ryan, retired clerk 
magistrate of Quincy District 
Court, has been named general 
chairman of Daniel G. 
Raymondi's campaign for mayor 
of Quincy. 

Ryan, who is also a former 
school committeeman and 
member of the City Hospital 
Board of Managers, retired from 
his court duties last spring after 
more than 30 years service. 

"It is with a deep sense of 
honor and personal pride that I 
make this announcement," said 
Raymondi. 

"Mr. Ryan has been a dear and 
loyal friend and a close and 
trusted advisor. His personal 
knowledge, background and 
expertise in local government will 
be an invaluable asset to our 
campaign. 

"Through his positive direction 
and leadership we will provide 
the citizens of Quincy with an 
aggressive and honest 

campaign." 

Ryan, who lives at 84 Fenno 
St., Wollaston, said. 

"The challenges of the 80s will 
be to supply the leadership and 
vision necessary to make the 
Mayor's office the positive force 
in city government that it should 
be. 

"Dan Raymondi has deep roots 
within our city. 

"His public life as an 
experienced elected official, as a 



successful trial attorney and as an 
experienced public official has 
been one of thoughtful evaluation 
and a marked sense of leadership. 
His family and educational back- 
ground have instilled within him a 
sense of morality and a dedication 
to purpose." 

"As a city councillor and as a 
respected practicing trial 
attorney, I have had the 
opportunity on numerous 
occasions to witness first hand his 
compassion and respect for his 
fellow man -- traits that are solely 
lacking in elected officials today. 

"As the newly appointed 
Chairman of the Downtown and 
Economic Development Com- 
mittee of the City Council, I have 
seen the results of his efforts in 
guiding numerous development 
projects through the City Council 
and into the building stage." 

"Dan Raymondi will be a firm 
and fair mayor who will be 
responsive to the needs of the 
people. He is one of a few leaders 
who can remain independent 
while administering our great 
city. 

"This campaign will be a 
dynamic and stimulating one 
which will enable the residents 
and tax payers of Quincy to 
clearly define his qualifications, 
professional background and 
accomplishments. Dan Raymondi 
is the kind of person Quincy 
needs for its next mavor." 



Sister Janet Constantino 
Graduates From Nursing School 



9 Residents Attend Christian Science 
Mother Church Annual Meeting 



Nine Quincy residents attended 
the recent 86th annual meeting of 
the members of the Mother 
Church of the First Church of 
Christ, Scientist, in Boston. 

Thev are Hollv and Warren 



Bolon, Barbara and David 
Chapin, Irene and AI Larrington, 
Shelly and William Ellington, and 
Esther Beach. 
Several thousand church 



members attended the two-day 
event. 

The Christian Science Church 
was founded by Mary Baker Eddy 
in 1879 and now has congre- 
gations in 56 countries. 



Gospel Crusaders Concert At Faith Lutheran 

201 Granite St., Quincy 



The Gospel Crusaders will 
present a special concert of 
Christian music Friday, July 10, 
at 8 p.m. at Faith Lutheran 



Church, 
Center. 

The team of eight young adults 
is part of the Youth Ministries 



outreach of the Lutheran Evange- 
listic Movement. 

The concert is open to the 
public. 



Sister Janet Constantino, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Anthony F. Constantino, 36 
Newcomb St., Quincy, was 
graduated with honors recently 
from Holy Name School of 
Nursing in Teaneck, N.J. 

She is a member of the Order of 
Franciscan Sisters of the 
Immaculate Conception assigned 
to Our Lady of Angeles Convent, 
Tenafly, N.J., which houses aged 
and sick sisters of the order. 

Sr. Janet attended St. John's 
Grammar School in Quincy, Font- 
bonne Academy, Boston State 



College and Notre Dame College 
in Manchester, N.H. 

She taught in schools of the 
Franciscan Order in Boston. 
Binghamton, N.Y., Syracuse and 
Philadelphia before receiving her 
assignment to Holy Name 
Hospital. 



Cortese Vows To Seek 
New Senior Security 



Joseph F. Cortese, a candidate 
for Ward 2 city councillor, said he 
will inquire extensively into the 
possibility of a new security system 
for senior citizen housing 
complexes in Ward 2. 

Cortese said he has learned from 
discussions with Clement A. 
O'Brien, executive director of the 
Quincy Housing Authority, that 
federal funding is available in the 
form of block grant money. 

'There is pending as part of this 
grant an application for a possible 
$100,000 that could be utilized for 
improving security measures, if 
granted," he said. 

Cortese said there is a definite 
need for security at all the senior 
citizen locations due to crimes such 
as vandalism, theft and general 
harassment of the elderly. 



"1 intend to diligently pursue this 
in future discussions with those 
currently involved in making 
decisions in this regard," he said. 

T have the qualifications 
necessary to pursue this important 
need to the entire community and I 
intend to do just that." 

Cortese is a retired member of 
the Quincy Police Department. 



Parsons & Richardson 

INSURANCE AGENCY 
INC. 

'Be Sure Now - Not Sorry Later** 



Robert W. Richardson 



Opposite Quincy 
Center MBTA 



P Resident 3 1276 



Wollaston Church 
of the fNazarene 




¥ TIT t 

Afi..FVT jMui 

37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston 

— Services — 

Sunday- 11:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m. 

Wednesday- 7:00 p.m. 

"Your Community Church" 



MEDICAL ASSOCIATES OF QUINCY, INC. 



GERALD ROSENBLATT, M.D., INC. 

Internal Medicine and 
diseases of the heart 

KENNETH J. EINSTEIN, M.D., INC. 

Internal Medicine and 
diseases of the lung 



ROBERT S. SIPZENER, M.D., INC. 

Internal Medicine and 
diseases of the gastrointestinal 
tract and liver 

CHARLES J. SCHWARTZ, M.D., INC. 

Internal Medicine and 
diseases of the gastrointestinal 
tract and liver 



takes pleasure in announcing that 

DENNIS S. GOLDIN, M.D. 

will hereafter be associated with them in the 
practice of Internal Medicine and Arthritic Diseases. 



Office Hours 

By Appointment 

773-2600 



21 School Street 
Quincy, Ma. 02169 




Feeling Guilty? Many 
people do. Reasons range 
from broken homes to 
unbroken habits. What- 
ever the cause, it's an 
ugly feeling. Guilt is 
both the fact of having 
done wrong and the feel- 
ing of blame for doing 
it. It's worst when the 
way you live leaves you 
empty, frustrated, and 
filled with regret. But 
there is a solution. Face 
the fact and remember 
God forgives. Then let 
Him! Before this ad was 
placed we started pray- 
ing for you because we 
care. Give us a chance to 
share. 



Glad Tidings Church 

158 Washington Street 

QUINCY 

...A church where something 
"WONDER HI." happens 
every Sunday! 

The Church... 

...in Study 9:.M) a.m. 

...in Worship 10:45 p.m. 

...in Celebration 6:30 p.m. 
Come.. .be a part. ..help us 
(•row! 



♦ A 



Pagr 14 Quinc* Sun Thursday, July 2, 1981 



K 




Community Service Page 



Quincy Sens Of Italy 

120 Quarry Street 



C.Y. Woodbury 

117 Quincy Ave. 



Celebrate the 




In Quincy 



FRIDAY, JULY 3 



• MERRYMOUNT BEACH - Quincy Shore Drive, 
Merrymount, 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m., Band Concert and 
Beauty Contest, sponsored by the Merrymount Association. 



SATURDAY, JULY 4 



• BAKER BEACH - Palmer Street, Germantown, Field Day, 
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., sponsored by Baker Improvement 
Association. 

• WELCOME YOUNG PLAYGROUND- Sagamore Street, 
Atlantic, 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.. Field Day, sponsored by 
Atlantic Community Association. 

• FAXON PARK - Faxon Park Road, South Quincy, Field 
Day. 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., sponsored by Adams Heights 
Men's Club. 

• HERON ROAD PLAYGROUND - Heron Road, Adams 
Shore, Parade and Flag Raising, 11:00 a.m., Family Type 
Concert and Supper, 6:00 p.m. to 12:00 midnight, sponsored 
by Adams Shore Community Association. 



• GENERAL PALMER PARK - Yardarm Lane, 
Germantown, Barbecue and Field Day, 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 
p.m., sponsored by Dar-Mi Mobile Market. 

• O'ROURKE FIELD - Quarry Street, West Quincy, Field 
Day, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., sponsored by Morrisette Post 
#294. 

• FORE RIVER FIELD- Nevada Road, Quincy Point, Field 
Day, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., sponsored by Ward II Civic 
Association. 

• WENDALL MOSES - Park Avenue, Squantum, Parade 
and Field Day, 8::00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., sponsored by 
Squantum Community Association. 

• FORBES HILL PLAYGROUND - Forbes Hill Road, 
Wollaston, Block Party, 1 1:00a.m. to 4:00p.m., sponsored by 
Summit Avenue Residents. 



SUNDAY, JULY 5 



• LaBRECQUE FIELD - Sea Street, Houghs Neck, Carnival, 
July 5th thru 11th, sponsored by Houghs Neck Community 
Council, Inc. 



The Quincy Sun Community Services Page 
spotlights on special events and civic projects ot 
non-profit and charitable organizations in Quincy. 
The page is sponsored by the following civic- 
minded Quincy business firms. 



• FRATERNA L 

Quincy Lodge of Elks No. 943 

1220 Hancock St., Quincy 

Sons of Italy, Quincy Lodge No. 1295 

120 Quarry St .Quincy 

• HARDWARE 

Granite City Hardware Co. 

86 Washington St. 



• HOME REMODELING 

Frank Evans Co. 

343 Newport Ave. 

• FINANCIAL 

Colonial Federal Savings & Loan Association 

15 Beach St. 

Granite Co-operative Bank 

440 Hancock St. 
100 Granite St. 

Hancock Bank 

5 Locations in Quincy 

Presidential Co-operative Bank 

1 Granite St. 

Quincy Co-operative Bank 

1259 Hancock St. 



Quincy Savings Bank 

5 Locations in Quincy 

South Boston Savings Bank 

690 Adams St. 

• FUEL OIL 

C. Y. Woodbury 

117 Quincy Ave. 

• NEWSPAPER, 

PRINTING 
The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock St. 



Thursday, July 2, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 15 




GARY DINARDO in action against Hingham Legion last Friday on his 
way to a one-hitter to lead Morrisette to a 6-1 victory. 

IQitincy Sun I'hiilos l>\ \lnr\ O'kt'rfv) 



MORRIS! I I h I I- (.ION'S Bob Beniers leans back from a pitch from Hingham's Kevin Shea. Morrisette 
won, 6-1. 



8-Run Inning 

DiNardo's Grand Slam Powers Morrisette 



Morrisette Legion breezed by 
Milton, 12-2, Monday night 
behind the seven-hit pitching of 
Mark Millane and Bruce Tobin to 
improve its Zone 6 record to 8-2. 

Morrisette will play Quincy 
tonight (Thursday) at 6 p.m. at 
Adams Field, will host Canton 
Monday night at 8 at Adams and 
will meet Norwell next Wednesday 
at 8 at Adams. 

Gary DiNardo had a grand slam . 
home run, triple and single to 
spark Morrisette over Milton. 
Morrisette scored four runs in the 
first on walks to Danny Boyle. 
Marty McLoughlin and Jim 
Bal/ano, Millane's two-run single, 
a fielder's choice an error and 
Kevin Howlett's single. 

In a wild second inning 
Morrisette scored eight runs on 
seven hits, a walk, two errors and a 
hit batter. DiNardo had his grand 
slam and triple in this inning and 
Millane and Howlett each had two 
hits and drove in two runs. 

Millane was the winningpitcher, 
going five innings and giving up six 
hits and two runs. Tobin pitched 
the last two innings, giv ing up a hit 
for his second save. Balzano 
played an outstanding game at 
third base. 



Last Sunday Morrisette upset 
Brockton's defending state 
champions. 4-2. at Brockton, with 
Paul Earle pitchingan outstanding 
game. He pitched a three-hitter 
and struck out eight. 

Millane was the hero as he pinch 
hit for Earle in the ninth inningand 
hit a two-run homer over the left 
field fence. He also pitched the 
final inning, striking out two. 

Morrisette scored twice in the 
first inning as Boyle doubled, 
McLoughlin doubled and Bal/ano 
singled. These were its only runs 
until Millane's heroics in the ninth. 

Steve Pecevich continued his 
fine hitting with two and Howlett 
also had two. 

Last Friday night Morrisette 
handed Hingham its first loss of 
the year. 6-0, with DiNardo 
pitching a one-hitter and striking 
out seven for his third victory. 

Morrisette pounded out 14 hits 
with Pecevich having a triple, two 
doubles and a single and driving in 
two runs, Bal/ano and Boyle 
having doubles, Rob Beniers two 
hits and an RBI. Millane a double 
and single and two RBIs. and 
McLoughlin two hits. The outfield 
played great ball with Beniers and 



Cathy O'Brien Takes 
First Place In Gym Meet 



The Cheryl Harris Gymnastic 
School held its seventh annual 
competition at Braintree High 
School with more than 200 from 
the South Shore competing. 

Quincy's Cathy O'Brien won the 
first place trophy in the elite 
division, Nadia Bouls of Quincy 
placed fifth in 3-6 year olds, 
Allison Lawrence of Quincy won 
in the 9-10 year old division with 
Dawn Hartnett in fifth place, Jill 
McLellan was third in the 7-9 year 
old group and Jill Askin also was a 
trophy winner. 

The Cheryl Harris School team, 
coached by Sandra Hayes, was 



unbeaten in five meets this season. 



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Boyle making fine running 
catches. 

Morrisette scored twice in the 
second when Brian Reale reached 
on an error, Pecevich tripled and 
Millane singled. In the third it 
added a run when McLoughlin 
singled. Bal/ano sacrificed and 
Beniers and Pecevich singled. In 
the fifth Bal/ano doubled. Beniers 
singled and Pecevich singled for 
two more runs. In the sixth Beniers 
reached on an error, Reale singled 
and Pecevich's double drove in 
Beniers with the final run. 

In its previous game Morrisette 
was upset by Randolph. 2- 1. 

Wollaston scored five runs in the 
first inning but Hingham came 
back to take a 9-8 decision as Dave 



Sports 



Rohrer pitched excellent ball in 
relief after taking over for starter 
John Beatey. 

Wollaston also lost to Milton. 5- 
2, as Milton pitcher Dave McLean 
pitched a no-hitter and struck out 
12. 

Wollaston will play at Brockton 
Monday at 6 o'clock (Fdgar 
Playground), and will be at 
Wevmouth Wednesday at 6. 



Quincy continued to play in 
hard luck and Monday night lost 
to Hingham. 9-5, after leading, 4-3, 
going into the seventh inning. 

Quincy will face Morrisette 
tonight (Thursday) at 6 at Adams 
field, will host Norwell Monday at 
6 at Adams and will be home to 
Holbrook next Wednesday night 
at 6 at Adams. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 



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Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2. 1981 



Awards Presented At 
North Track Banquet 



Junior Farm League 



The North Quincy track teams, 
which recently finished successful 
seasons, held their annual awards 
banquet recently at Vallee's in 
Braintree. 

The awards to the outstanding 
girls' team, which finished as 
unbeaten Suburban League 
champions, dominated the league 
meet and finished a close second in 
the Eastern Mass. and state meets, 
-were presented by Coach Lou 
Tozzi. 

The awards to the boys team, 
which finished 5-3, were given by 
Coaches George Liset and Bart 
Petracca. 

The spring track girls' MVP was 
Michelle Millane, whose only 
defeats this year were in the 
Eastern Mass. and state meets and 
who won the New England discus 
championship at Concord, N.H., 
defeating Kathy Durante of 
Winchester, who had upset her in 
both the Eastern Mass. and state 
meets. 

The coaches award went to Kara 
Crenan. who had an outstanding 
year in the high jump and won the 
New England title after winning 
the state meet. She topped 
Elizabeth O'Connor of Weymouth 
South, who had defeated her in the 



Junior League 



state coaches meet and the league 
meet. 

Karen Lindenfel/er was the 
unsung hero in spring track. 

The winter MVP was Mary Kate 
Kennedy, the coaches award went 
to Nancy McCarthy and the 
unsung hero was Deirdre 
Donovan. 

In cross country Sheila Barrett 
was the MVP and Linda Kennedy 
won the coaches award. 

A special award, presented by 
guest Patti Lyons Catalano, the 

second-ranked women's distance 
runner in the world, went to 
Deirdre Corrigan. Patti, who was 
accompanied by her husband, Joe 
Catalano, former Quincy High 
coach, donated her second place 
Boston Marathon trophy to 
Corrigan as the senior who 
deserved special recognition. 

Tozzi presented gifts to the nine 
girls who formed the foundation ot 
the tremendous season and placed 
in at least two of the state meets 
this year. They were MaryCrehan, 
Nancy McCarthy, Mary Kate 
Kennedy, Sheila Barrett, Linda 
Kennedy. Karen Lindenfelzer, 
Michelle Millane, Kara Crenan 
and Deirdre Donovan. 

Captains' awards went to 



Laracy Fires One 
As Foley Sets A.L 



Foley Plymouth-Chrysler 

continues to lead the Junior Base- 
ball League's American League 
with a 14-3 record. 

In its latest game, Foley 
blanked Remick's, 7-0, as second 
baseman Bob Laracy was called 
upon to pitch his first game, with 
one of the starters on vacation. 
He responded with a one-hitter, 
striking out seven and walking 



only one. No Remick base runner 
reached second. 

Laracy also had two singles and 
drove in two runs. Kyle 
Robertson had two singles and 
scored twice and Sean Gately and 
Mike Routier had singles. 

Foley also bombed Houghs 
Neck Legion, 15-0, behind the 
three-hit pitching of Chris 
Marshall, who improved his 



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By John Vahnte 



POOL CUES 



True, your home swimming 
pool can provide limitless fun and 
relaxation - but it can also be a 
source of danger. Hospital records 
are repleat with records of fatal 
accidents (especially among 
children), which took place in this 
environment. Here's some pool 
cues to keep in mind. 

The two most important 
safeguards pool-owning 

homeowners can provide are (1) 
permanent fencing, with a 
self-locking gate, around the pool 
or yard area and (2) proper adult 
supervision when there are 
swimmers in the pool. 

Post written instruction, 
including directions for artificial 
respiration, in the pool areas. A 
casual mention of the rules is 
easily forgotten. Allow only one 
person on the diving board at a 
time and torbid swimming under 
the board. 



Make sure that extension cords 
for radios and other appliances 
used near the pool are properly 
grounded and that children do 
not take glass, stones, or hard 
balls into or alongside the 
swimming pool. 



• * * 
This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by \ \BORHOOi)PH\KM\( V. 
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Corrigan, Linda Morash, Robyn 
O'Donnell and Mary Crehan. 

Walter McConaghy was the 
boys spring MVP, John Mantalos 
received the coaches award and 
Joe McDonald was the unsung 
hero. 

Lou DiPietro was the winter 
MVP, Gary Morin won the 
coaches award and Jack Brown 
was the unsung hero. 

Morin was the cross country 
MVP and Rick O'Brien won the 
coaches award. 

Tim Allen received the senior 
achievement plaque and Brown, 
McConaghy, DiPietro, Allen and 
McDonald received captains' 
awards. 

Special guests, in addition to 
Patti and Joe Catalano, were 
principal Peter Chrisom, Asst. 
Principal Mrs. Feeney, Athletic 
Coordinator Carl Leone and 
Quincy Track Coach Geoff 
Hennessy. 

Certificates went to all the boys 
and girls who broke school 
records. The captains presented 
gifts to the coaches and flowers to 
Mrs. Tozzi. Tozzi presented a slide 
show of the season's highlights and 
all the athletes received letters. 

--TOM SULLIVAN 



Hitter 
. Pace 

record to 5-1. Jay DiBartolo had 
two long home runs, Tom Tagen 
had a homer and single, Dan 
Biagini had two singles, 
Robertson had two singles and 
scored twice, Gately had a two- 
run triple, Kevin Duffy had a 
single and scored twice and Mike 
Sanda and Sean Mulkern had 
singles. Foley jumped off to an 
11-0 lead in the first two innings, 
and the subs had plenty of chance 
to play. Joe Gately and Jackie 
Green played well in the field. 

Biagini, whose brother Bob is 
playing in the Red Sox farm 
system, improved his average to 
'690 (38 hits in 55 times at bat). 

Swimming 
Schedule 

The Quincy Recreation 
Department announces next 
week's schedule of swimming 
instructions at the city's beaches. 

Thursday beach hours are from 
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The schedule: 
Non-swimmer I. 2 p.m.; non- 
swimmer 2, 2:30; beginner I, 10 
a.m.; beginner 2, 10:30; advanced 
beginner, 1:30; intermediate, II; 
basic rescue and water safety, 
11:30; advanced life saving, 12- 
1:30. 

Friday beach hours are from 1 1 
to 4. The schedule: non-swimmer 
1,11 a.m.; non-swimmer 2, 1 1:30; 
beginner I, 3 p.m.; beginner 2, 
3:30; advanced beginner, 2:30; 
intermediate, 12; basic rescue and 
water safety and advanced life 
saving, I; 2:30. 



Nationals Defeat 
Americans, 5-1 



In the annual Junior Farm 
League all-star games last 
Saturday, the Nationals defeated 
the Americans, 5-1, in the 10-year 
old game and the Americans 
topped the Nationals, 7-1, in the 
"B" 8-9-10-year old game. 

In the 10-year old game Mike 
Walsh, Tim Brillo and Mike 
Toland pitched two innings each 
for the Nationals, scattering six 
hits and striking out II. Sean 
Capplis of the Giants was the 
games MVP and had two hits and 
two RBIs. Jeff Adams was MVP 
runnerup and had a home run. 
Sean Burke had an RBI single and 
Jeff McCloryand Eric Jancaterino 
had singles. 

For the Americans Eddie 
Hanson, Paul McClellon, Mike 
Kiley, Jimmy Gordon, Eddye 
Ryan and Eddie Brosman did the 
pitching and gave up six hits and 
struck out 14. Danny Steele was 
the team's MVP and had a long 
triple and made an excellent catch. 
Kiley tripled and scored the only 
run. Chris Kyler tripled and Bobby 
Herman, Danny Piccini and Matt 
Beardsley had the other hits. 

In the "B" game for 8, 9 and 10- 



year olders, Eric DeBoer, Matt 
Smith, Pat O'Donoghue, Billy 
Monteith, Lance Gilbert and 
Danny Gilmartin all pitched for 
the winning Americans, scattering 
four hits and striking out 1 1. 

Matt Smith of the Red Sox won 
MVP honors and had a two-run 
homer, an RBI single and a great 
catch at shortstop, starting a 
double play. He pitched one inning 
and allowed no hits and struck out 
two. Steve Kaval of the Indians 
was runnerup MVP and had two 
hits and two RBIs. O'Donoghue 
had a long homer and pitched well 
and Kevin Daly, Tim Roche and 
Chris Abate had the other hits. 
Billy Monteith walked and had an 
RBI. 

For the Nationals, Mike 
Connor, Joe Crespi, Robert 
Crespi, Mark Cafano, Jason 
Leahy and Tim Murphy all pitched 
well. Peter McLoughlin singled, 
walked and scored the only run, 
Cafano singled and had the only 
RBI. Cafano and McLoughlin 
were co-runnersup for the game's 
MVP. Tommy Mayo and Connor 
had the other hits. 



4 Track Club 

Members Make 

Youth Games Team 



The Quincy Track Club had a 
big day at the Youth Games 
tryouts last week at White 
Stadium with four members 
assured of spots on the Boston 
team in the Nationals in August. 

Several others could be 
selected as they finished second 
to those who won two events. 
(Team members can compete in 
only one event in the Nationals). 

Mike Williams won the 14-15 
220 with a time of 23.9 This will 
be Mike's fifth year in the 
Nationals. 

Maureen Roche won the 14-15 
long jump at 15-4 l A and will be in 
the Nationals for the fourth year. 

Finn Kelly won the high jump 
at 4-10 and also won the 880 in 
2:25 in the 12-13 division. He was 
a National Junior Olympic 
champion in 1979 but this will be 
his first National Youth Games. 

The big surprise of the day was 
Patrick Murphy winning the 9-11 
440 in 1:18.9. 

Alternates are Tracy Parker in 
the 12-13 high jump, Julie 
Supple, 14-15 high jump; Lorrie 



McNeill, 9-11 long jump; Tony 
Rugnetta, 9-11 long jump. 

Also, Jamie McArdle, 12-13 
long jump; Marie D'Attilio, 12-13 
long jump; Mattv Werth, 9-11 
880; Mike Petta, 9-11 100; Denise 
Petta, 14-15 100, and Kristine 
Picarski, 14-15 220. 

The "B" team concluded its 
season with a cookout and awards 
ceremony at Veterans Memorial 
Stadium last Saturday. Fifty boys 
and girls were promoted to the 
"A" team and over 200 received 
certificates from Coach Jeff 
Hennessy for completing the 
season. 

Trophies for most improvement 
in June went to Marianne 
Gorman and Sutee Sirikan- 
janachae. MVP trophies went to 
Steve Bartkus, Regina Murphy, 
Matt Flynn, Ann Marie Curtin, 
David Cawthorne, Elizabeth 
Renda, Brian Barrett, Marta 
Martinez, Robert Kearney, Robin 
Guilfoy, Brendan Farrell, Tracy 
Cullen, Jimmy McAdams and 
Laura Ciulla. 



Koch N.Q. District 
Closes Out 31st Season 



The North Quincy District of 
the Koch Club, will close out its 
31st season Monday, July 6, at 
6:30 p.m. at Cavanagh Stadium, 
Birch St., North Quincy. 

Members of the boys baseball 
and girls softball leagues will be 




NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 



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recognized and presented 
certificates for attendance and 
achievement during the season 
competition. 

Parents, relatives and friends 
are invited to attend. 

District Director Gary Demole, 
will present the boys' awards 
while Mrs. Simone Koch will 
direct the girls' softball citations. 

Ice cream will be distributed 
following the brief speaking 
program. 

The Koch Club Boys Baseball 
Program was originated in 1951 
with 44 boys in the North Quincy 
area participating while the girls 
softball program was formed in 
1952 with 12 girls. 

The program now includes four 
sections of the city where Koch 
Club activities are conducted 
during the spring of each year 
including the North Quincy, 
Broad Meadows, Montclair and 
West Quincy locations. 



McClellon Fans 13 

Red Sox Win 
Junior Farm Title 



Thursday, Jul* i 1981 Quincy Sun Pagr 17 



The Red Sox scored three runs 
in the third inning and defeated 
the Giants, 4-1, last Friday to win 
the Junior Farm League 
championship. 

The Red Sox had won the 
American division and the Giants 
had taken the National division in 
a playoff game with the Braves. 

Paul McClellon pitched a five- 
hitter, struck out 13 and walked 
four to cap an outstanding 
season. Kevin Daly was the 
offensive star with a three-run 
homer in the third, a walk and two 
runs scored and also played an 
outstanding defensive game. The 
top defensive play was turned in 
by Joey Hannon, who made a 
great running catch in center field 
and doubled up the runner at 
first. Martin Feeney and Timmy 
Roche each had a hit and Roche 
also walked. Dan Steele, Matt 
Smith, Brian Zimmerman, 
Michael Hughes and Mike 
Doherty all reached base with 
Hughes and Doherty scoring on 
Daly's home run. Ken 
Staskiewitz, Jamie Greene, Chris 
Kyler, Nicky Levins and Matt 
Ryan all played well. 

For the Giants Dave Murphy 
pitched excellent ball over the last 
three innings, giving up one hit 
and striking out five. Mike 
Connor and Sean Burke also 
pitched. Peter McLoughlin, Sean 
Capplis, Sean Burke, Connor and 
Bobby Kane singled, Kane 
driving in the only run. 

David Connolly made a great 
catch in center and doubled a 
runner off second, Capplis also 
made a fine catch in left and Paul 
Flynn, Karyn Mosher, Derek 
Adams, Tim Collins, Tom Bagley, 
Jeff Clifford, Carmine Oliva and 
Jennifer Cook all played well. 

The Giants scored nine runs in 
the third and six in the fourth to 
bomb the Braves, 18-1, in the 
playoff game to decide the 
National Division title. 

Murphy pitched a two-hitter 
and struck out 13. Murphy's 
three-run homer sparked the 
nine-run third. Kane had a home 
run, double and single, Burke had 
a homer and double, Connor had 
a triple and single, McLoughlin 
singled twice and scored three 
runs, Flynn singled twice and 
Capplis singled and made two 
great catches in left. Connolly 
tripled and Bagley had a single. 
Cook and Adams each walked 
twice and scored twice. Mosher 
walked twice and scored a run, 
Collins walked twice and Oliva 
and Clifford played well in the 
field. 



the Braves Danny Crespi 
ong triple and Sean 



For 
had a 
Murphy hit the ball hard 

In regular season play the 
Orioles finished their season with 
an 8-5 win over the Tigers with 
Eddie Ryan the winning pitcher, 
striking out 17. Steve Nabstedt 
led the attack with a home run, 
double and single and scored 
twice. Jeff Pugliese had two hits, 
including a triple, and John 
Kelly, Bobby Herman and Eric 
Sherman also had hits. The 
Tigers trailed, 8-0, but came back 
with four runs in the bottom of the 
fourth and one in the fifth. Fine 
defensive plays by Pat 
McNamara, Russ Conley, and 
Tommy McNamara enabled the 
Orioles to hold on to their lead. 

The Orioles also blasted the 
Yankees, 14-7, pounding out 17 
hits. Herman was the winning 
pitcher, striking out nine. 
Herman also led the offense with 
three hits. The Orioles scored five 
runs in the first, led by John 
Kelly's three-run homer. Danny 
Gilmartin, Sal Manganaro, Brian 
Manteville (home run) and 
Pugliese had two hits each and 
Sherman, Kevin Kelly and Ryan 
one apiece. Joe Nabstedt reached 
base three times and scored 
twice. Ryan made an outstanding 
diving stop to start a double play. 
The Red Sox defeated the 
Angels, 9-5, with Steele the 
winning pitcher, striking out 16 
and walking only two. The Sox 
clinched the win with seven runs 
in the fourth inning. Daly led off 
the inning with a walk, Feeney 
reached on an error, Roche was 
hit by a pitch filling the bases, 
Staskiewitz walked to force in the 
tying run, McClellon lined a base 
hit off the pitcher's glove for two 
runs, Smith lined a single to drive 
in two more runs and McDonough 
doubled to score Smith and raced 
around to score when the ball 
went past the right fielder. Eric 
DeBoer pitched well for the 
Angels and struck out 16, but 
walked nine. He allowed only four 
hits. Kirk McDonald had a two- 
run homer and single. 

The Red Sox edged the Braves, 
1-0, on McClellon's one-hitter. 
He struck out 17 and walked only 
three. Ryan scored the winning 
run in the fifth inning when he 
walked and scored on Feeney 's 
line shot to left. Smith and 
Zimmerman had the other Sox 
hits. McDonough and Staskiewitz 
played well behind the plate. Bob 
Crespi pitched well in a losing 
cause, striking out eight, while 
Timmy Brillo made several out- 
standing plays in the field. 



Hershey Track, 
Field Meet July 8 



The Braintree Park Department 
will hold the local competition of 
the Hershey Track and Field meet 
on Wednesday, July 8, at Braintree 
High School. 

The meet starts at I o'clock and 
is open to all boys and girls from 9 
to 15 who do not belong to any 



track club. The competition will 
include the standing long jump, 
softball throw, 50, 100, 200, 400 
and 800 meter dashes and the 1500- 
meter run. 

Further information can be 
obtained by contacting the 
Braintree Park Dept. 




AT THE RECENT Quincy High School Hockey Boosters Club dinner the officers were presented an award 
for their outstanding work during the past season. Making the presentation to President Ace Abboud is 
Beverly Reinhardt. Left to right, Vice President Pat Quigg, Treasurer Pam Craig, Reinhardt, Abboud, 
Secretary Maureen Bambery and Vice President John Baylis. 



Babe Ruth Baseball 

Morrisette Moves 
Toward Playoff Berth 



Morrisette continued to play 
well and edged its way toward a 
playoff berth in the Babe Ruth 
League's National League with a 
9-2 victory over Golden Print. 

Morrisette started with three 
runs in the first inning, the key 
blow being a bases loaded single 
by Joe Grimaldi. In the third Vin 
Cristiani blasted a triple and he 
and Jack Outerbridge scored on a 
two-base error for a 5-0 lead. 

Golden scored its two runs in 
the bottom of the fifth, Mike 
Bourikas having a triple and Jeff 
Timberlake a double. Morrisette 
salted the game away with four 
runs in the seventh with Jerry 
Frazier and Ricky Kelley having 
the key hits. 

Outerbridge pitched well, 
keeping eight hits well-scattered 
and striking out six. He also had a 
double. Cristiani scored three 
runs, Brian Scalata played well in 
the field and also scored two runs. 
Lou Gonzales walked four times 
and he, Frazier and Kelle ■/ played 
well in the field. Chr.s Rossi 

Koch Montclair 
Awards Night 

The Montclair District of the 
Koch Club will conclude its 13th 
season of spring recreational 
activities with its annual awards 
night Tuesday, July 7, at 6:30 
p.m. at the Bishop Playground, 
Holbrook Rd., Montclair. 

Members of the Boys Baseball 
and Girls Softball Leagues will be 
presented with attendance and 
achievement certificates. 

District Director Howard F. 
Crowley will be the emcee. He 
will be assisted by Mrs. Janet 
Crowley of the women's softball 
program and the volunteer 
supervisors of the Montclair 
Neighborhood Program. 

Following the ceremonies, ice 
cream will be distributed to the 
children. 



played well behind the plate for 
Golden and had two hits. 

Morrisette defeated the VFW, 
6-1, behind the pitching of 
Cristiani, who allowed only four 
hits, struck out seven and walked 
one. Morrisette scored four runs 
in the first inning on an error, a 
single by Tom Connolly, two 
walks and singles by Grimaldi 
and Frazier. 

In the fourth Eric Roukey 
tripled and Ed Boyle doubled for 
VFW's only run. Morrisette had 
men on base in nearly every 
inning, but VFW pitcher Charles 
Jaehnig pitched out of trouble 
until Morrisette added two runs 
in the sixth. Gonzales doubled 
and, with two outs, Cristiani 
singled Gonzales home and 
Scalata singled in Cristiani. 

Outerbridge had three hits, 
Cristiani, Gonzales and Connolly 
two each and Frazier, Scalata and 
Grimaldi one apiece. Outerbridge 
played excellent defense at third 
base and Scalata started an 



excellent double play at second. 
Boyle had two hits and Steve 
Hogan and Roukey the others for 
VFW. 

Hancock Bank defeated the 
Police Club, 14-7, with Paul 
Scibilio getting the win with relief 
help from Andy Lenhardt and 
John O'Connor. Steve White, 
Steve Higgins and Mike Conlon 
paced a 13-hit attack. Eight runs 
in the first two innings iced the 
game for Hancock. 



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Rick Nichols, Store Manager 

MY OLDER HOME HAS MANY 
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m PAINT FILM SOME OF WHICH 
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WHAT SHOULD I DO? 
Most probably the paint film is suffering from 
checking. This develops when a paint film 
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more paint to the problem. The best solution 
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information you need to make a decision. 

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At the Milton-Quincy Line 



HANCOCK 



Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 1981 



Arts/Entertainment 



Frances Osborne School 
Presents Dance Revue 



Frances Osborne, director and 
teacher of the Frances Osborne 
School of Dancing, recently 
presented her pupils in "Dance 
Revue 8 1" at Sterling Junior High 
School. 

The cast included: 

Sandra Ames. Lynne Anderson, 
Peggy Behenna, Mary Liz 
Belmonte. Julie Bernick. Ruth 
Anne Bickford. Pamela Brennan. 
Alicia Brown. Kerri Burns. 
Beverly Carroll, Jennifer Carlson. 
Tracy Chaupetta. Cheri Cooper. 
Colleen Cooper, K r i s t e n 
Davenport, Fori Derbes. Colleen 
Doherty. Stacy Duart. Wendy 
Duart, Feeanne Dunkle. Joanna 
Dyer. Cathleen Edgar. Deirdre 
Fay. Jennifer Fay, Margaret Fay, 
Fynne Feeley. Laura Flannery. 
Robin Ford. Carolyn Forshee. 
Paula Forshee, Lisa Gacicia. 
Sandra Gerome, Wendy Gerome. 
Michelle Gould, Rosalyn Gould. 
Amy Grasso. Holly Gray, Megan 
Harford, Jennifer Harper, Tracy 
Hoey, Terri Horion. Theresa 
Hudson, Danielle lacobucci. 
Francine Jancaterino, Susan 
Karstunen, Carolyn Keddy. 

Jennifer Keddy, Lauren Keeney, 
Rachel Keeney, Heidi Koster. 
Jennifer Koster, Tanya Kutasz, 
Linda Lawton, Robyn Linehan. 
Andrea Lottero, Kathleen Macy. 
Karen McCabe. Nancy McCabe, 
Dominique McDonald. Jennifer 
MacDonald, Rebecca McCosh. 
Judy McNulty, Tara Murphy, 
Mary Elizabeth Nee, Susan Nolan, 
Angerl Nogueira, Laurie 
O'Connell. Maura O'Gara. Alicia 
Palmieri, Nicole Paone. Melissa 
Perry, Donna Jean Pettengill, 
Sharon Pettengill, Jennifer 
Pettinelli, Gina Piccarini, Danielle 



Quirk. Heather Rendle, Holly 
Rendle. Phyllis Reynolds, Melissa 
Robinson, Jennifer Schlosky, 
Sheryl Selby. Christy Selby, 
Donna Shea, Kathy Shea, Anita 
Silverstein, Jennifer Slack, 
Stephanie Spadorcia, Donna 
Striano, Karen Striano, Su/y 
Sullivan, Renee' Vieno, Jill 
Waters. Marcy Yeragotelis. 

Ten year awards were presented 
to Wendy (Jerome. Robyn 
Linehan, Alicia Palmieri and 
Robin Ford. 

Five year pins went to Alicia 
Brown, Fori Derbes, Michelle 
Gould. Andrea Lottero, Jennifer 
Pettinelli, Holly Rendle, Renee' 
Vieno and Marcv Yeragotelis. 

Perfect attendance awards were 
presented to Sandra Ames, 
Pamela Brennan, Tracy 
Chaupetta, Cheri Cooper, Stacy 
Duart. Wendy Duart, Joanna 
Dyer, Laura Flannery, Michelle 
Gould, Tracy Hoey, Francine 
Jancaterino, Jennifer Keddy, 

Heidi Koster, Jennifer Koster, 
Tanya Kutas/, Robyn Linehan, 
Kathleen Macy, Dominique, 
McDonald, Jennifer MacDonald, 
Nicole Paone, Donna Jean 
Pettengill, Gina Piccarini, 
Danielle Quirk, Heather Rendle, 
Holly Rendle, Melissa Robinson, 
Jennifer Schlosky, Sheryl Selby, 
Christy Selby and Jennifer Slack. 

Students who attended Dance 
Olympus were Wendy Gerome, 
Francine Jancaterino, Robyn 
Linehan. Alicia Palmieri. 

Miss Osborne is a member of the 
Boston Dance Teachers Club of 
Boston and The Greater Brockton 
Dance Teachers Association. 

The studio is open for summer 
instructions. 




1514 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY 



SAVE ON RECORDS 

TAPES-LUGGAGE 

SHEET MUSIC 

LEATHER GOODS & MORE 





Dinner Specials from s 3.50 

Daily 3:00-9:00 

Chinese Polynesian Food 

* New Additional Luncheon 
Specials 11:30 to 3 P.M. 

* Dinner Specials 3 P.M. to 9 P.M. 

* Banquet Facilities 

* Cocktail Lounge 




5T CALL AHEAD FOR 

FAST SERVICE '^ 

Banquet Facilities Available 



105 Sea St., Quincy 

TAKE OUT ORDERS 
471-2255 




WILLIAM P. FARRAR receives plaque in recognition of his 25 years as treasurer of the Quincy Historical 
Society. Left to right, H. Hobart Holly, historian; Farrar; Dr. James R. Cameron, president; William A. 
O'Connell, past president. 

(Ohvrn f'holu) 

Dr. James R. Cameron Re-elected 
Historical Society President 



Dr. James R. Cameron was re- 
elected president ol the Quincy 
Historical Society at the 
organization's 89th annual 
meeting held recently in the Adams 
Academy Building. 

Also re-elected were Doris S. 
Oberg. first vice president; David 
R. Day, second vice president; Lila 
M. Vorce, secretary; William P. 
Farrar. treasurer; H. Hobart 
Holly, historian; Dr. George R. 
Horner, archeologist. 



Elected as directors for three 
years were Lawrence D. Gall. 
Edward W. Hanson. Helene D. 
Johnson, Gordon F. Nelson, Dana 
Ricciardi. and Nancy Santry. 

Robert W. Gardiner was elected 
a director for two years. Catherine 
Roeder, one year. 

William P. Farrar was presented 



a plaque in recognition of his 
completing 25 years as treasurer of 
the society. 

Also honored was Leonard C. 
Wirtanen who has established a 
trust for the benefit of the society's 
library, designated at the library as 
Wirtanen Library. A special 
exhibit, now open to the public, 
was opened in the South Room. 



BSZE3333 



Gayle Kiley Art 
In Bridgewater Exhibit 



Featuring 

the Finest In 

\e u- England 

Cooking 



LUNCHEON 
II A.M. to 4 P.M. 

DINNER 

4 P.M. to 10 P.M. 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

Bowling Banquets 

Retirement Parties Showers 

Weddings & Anniversaries 



Entertainment 

Nightly at the 

Fireside Lounge 

FOR RESERVATIONS 
Call 471 1623, 471 5540 




(iayle Kiley of Quincy recent!} 
exhibited her oil paintings in 
Kridgcwater Stale College's senior 
art exhibit. 



Miss Kilev . daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. William P. Kiley of 119 
Crabtree Rd . Suuantum, is an art 
major. 



Be in a CHILDREN'S PLAY!!! 

Boys and Girls 6-16 yrs. 331-4941 

Register - Woodward School 

1102 Hancock St., Quincy Square 

July 7th 12:00 - 2:00 p. m. 

Classes on Tues., Wed's July 8 — Aug. 21 



LAS VEGAS NIGHT 

Saturday, July 11, 1981 
7 P.M. to Midnight 

Sponsored by 

Quincy Lodge 1295 
Sons of Italy in America 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 
REFRESHMENTS DONATION $1.00 



*- * 



* * 



Thursday, July 2, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 19 



Over 800 Expected 
At Chamber Outing 



More than 800 members and 
guests of the South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce are 
expected to participate in the 56th 
annual outing Wednesday, July 8 
at the Ridder Country Club, Rte. 
14, Whitman. 

Activities will start at 9a.m. with 
a golf tournament. Tennis matches 
and a racquetball tournament 
begin at 10 a.m. Contests in 
horseshoe pitching, cribbage, 
bocce. softball. a golf putting 
contest, football throwing, and 
basketball free throw are 
scheduled throughout the 
remainder of the afternoon. 
The dinner menu includes 



chowder and steamers served at I 
p.m. followed by barbecued 
chicken, lobster, corn on the cob, 
knockwurst, salad, rolls and fresh 
fruit. The dinner will be prepared 
by Breen's, Inc. of Ridder Country 
Club. 

Serving will start at 5:45 p.m. 
Tickets for the outing are $19.50 
per person. 

Chairman, Don Olson, of the 
Braintree Savings Bank is 
encouraging firms to make this 
event their own company outing. 
Further inquiries or ticket 
reservations can be obtained by 
calling the South Shore Chamber 
at 479-1 1 1 I. 



Photographer Robert B. (iorrill 
To Conduct Workshops 



Photographer Robert B. Gorrill 
of Squantum will conduct three 
photography workshops this 
summer beginning the week of 
July 13. 

Each workshop will consist of 
eight sessions. Class size will be 
limited so that each participant 
can receive personalized 
instruction. 

Thursday evening workshops 
will focus on night photography 
and methods in black and white 
photography. 

Workshops Tuesday afternoons 
will deal with basic camera 
handling, selection of films, 
choosing lenses and filters, and 
developing good photographic 
skills. 

Friday afternoon workshops 



will cover color slide photography 
and how to get the most out of 
your equipment. There will be 
many short photography field 
trips. Students will view each 
other's slides during a critique 
session. 

Gorrill has taught photography 
in the Quincy Adult Education 
program, at Delano's Camera, at 
Eastern Nazarene College and 
has also conducted many 
workshops over the past several 
years. 

He is also a member of the 
Photographic Society of America 
the South Shore Camera Club, 
and the American Society of 
Magazine Photographers. 

For more information and to 
reserve space in the workshops, 
call Gorrill at 328-401 2. 



HN Council Sponsoring 
Carnival, Field Day 



The annual carnival and field 
day sponsored by the Houghs 
Neck Community Council will be 
held July 7 - 11 at Sea and 
Rockland Sts. 

Hours will be from 6 to 1 1 p.m. 
through Friday, and noon to 11 
p.m. Saturday. 

Field day events at LaBrecque 
Field start at 1:30 p.m. with a 
bicycle parade, followed by doll 
carriage and horribles parade. 
"Miss Teenage Houghs Neck", a 
dress-up beauty competition is 
scheduled for 5 p.m. with Elaine 
Bergstrom in charge. 

Lawrence Driscoll, newly- 
elected treasurer of the Houghs 
Neck Community Council, is 
general chairman, with Pamela 
Craig and Edythe Nigro in charge 
of a refreshment stand. 

Assisting will be other newly- 
elected officers: John Nigro, 
president; David DiBona, vice 
president; Ann Connolly, 
corresponding secretary; Dorothy 
Laing, recording secretary; and 
executive board members Karen 



O'Neill, Terri Pepi. Peggy Nigro, 
Jean Keefe, Mary Holler, Mary 
Collins and John Roman. 




14 Beale St 



7734600 



Wed & Thurs July 1 & 2 

Sensitive, Intense, Emotional 
"The Great Santini" <pg) 

Eve's 7:00 Only 



Starts Fri July 3 

SEAN CONNERY IN 

"OUTLAND" (R) 

Fast Moving, Suspenseful 

An Audience Pleaser 

Fri & Sat. 7:00 & 9:15 

Sun -Thurs 7:00 Only 

Mon & Tues Dollar Night 



SEATS $1.50 MAT'S $1.25 



Ward 2 July 4th Events 
Al Fore River Field 



The annual Independence Day 
festivities sponsored by the Ward 
II Civic Association will begin at 
10 a.m., Saturday, July 4 at Fore 
River Field, Quincy Point. 

Entries in the following field 
events will be at 10 a.m.: Sack 
race, three legged race, wheel 
barrow race - dashes. 

Horse drawn hayrides will be 
from 10 a.m. until noon. At noon 



the doll carriage, horribles and 
bike parades will take place. 

Trophies for winners of field 
events and parades will be 
awarded at noon, with an egg 
throwing contest for age groups 
lb to 20 and 21 and over 
following. Free hot dogs, ice 
cream, tonic and prizes will be 
furnished throughout the day. 



Members of the 4th of July 
committee are Robert Allison. 
Phyllis Bagen, Thomas Barrett, 
Isabel Brugge, Bart Cagianno, 
Robert Cerasoli, Ted De 
Cristofaro, Dorothy Eaton. Owen 
Eaton, Michael Grant, James 
Lyons. Carmela Mood, Robert 
Mood, Daniel Raymondi. Sharyn 
Raymondi. 

Rain date is Sunday. 



Happy Acres Day Camp Opens 



Day Camp for 
special needs. 



Happy Acres 
children with 
sponsored by the Park and 
Recreation Board, will open 
Thursday, July 2. in the William F. 
Ryan Memorial Recreation Area 
at Pageant Field. 

The camp will provide learning 
and growth experiences, according 
to Charles I.. Alongi. Jr., director 



of recreation. In addition to camp 
programs, a number of day trips 
will be offered. 

Traditional activities such as 
hikes, picnics, overnight camping, 
sports and competitive events are 
included to provide each child an 
opportunity to compete and learn 
in accordance with their own 
abilities. 



Iransporafion and milk are 
provided daily without charge. 

For information concerning 
admission requirements call the 
Recreation Department at 773- 
1 380 Extension 204. Those 
interested in the Volunteer leader 
Program should call the same 
number. 



'Music Man' To Premiere At Old Colony Theatre 



Ruth Ferrara of Squantum is 
publicity director for Old Colony 
Theatre, Plymouth Center, which 
will feature Mi M Production's 
"Music Man" beginning 

H.N. Center 

Planning 

Music Circus Trip 

The Houghs Neck Community 
Center. 1193 Sea St., is 
tentatively planning a trip to the ' 
South Shore Music Circus, 
Cohasset, for an evening 
performance. 

The trip is for residents of all 
ages. A bus will be hired for 
transportation. 

Residents are asked to contact 
the center if interested in 
attending. 

Further details are available by 
calling Patricia Ridlen at 471 -8251 
or 479-7682. 



W- UKB ' S 
' OUNGE 



M 



Wednesday, July I . at 8 p.m. 

The show will continue through 
July 11. 

M & M recently began its 
season with "South Pacific". 
Among the season's 12 musical 
comedies will be "Sweet 
Charity" and "Manic". 

Children's Theatre, directed bv 



Leila Saad, will present "The 
Wizard ofOz" July 7. 

Reduced rate tickets are 
available for senior citizens and 
students. There arc also group 
rates for 25 or more people. 

Shows start at 8 p.m., except 
for a twilight show Sundays 
starting at 7 p.m. 



South Shore Television 

SALES AND SERVICE 

Save with Carry in Service 



ItC/l 

Authorized 
Servicenter 



In or out of warranty 

Regardless 

where purchased 



Service in All Leading 
Brands for Over 30 Years 

479-1350 

Remo DeNicola Lie. No. 12 
12 Revere Road, Quincy 

i Off 1586 Hancock Street) 



CONNORS 

Jocatist/Guitariit 



[DOUG 



THU«* 
-SAT 



Shadow of Time 

Oldies Plus 
Have a glorious Holiday weekend 
at Luke's with live entertainment 



51-57 GRANITE SI 




THE HIGH RISE 

RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 

6-8 Maple St., Quincy (opp. south shore Bank) 
Serving Italian - American Dishes 

Luncheon Specials Dally 11:30 A.M 

FROM MARK'S BROILER 

Baked Lasagna - Beef Shish Kabob 

Fried Clams - Fried Scallops 

Broiled Schrod 

from $3.50 
A free glass of wine with any Broiler Dinner 

DINNER SPECIALS 

Starting from 4:30 p.m. 
Dining Room open Mon. thru rri. 

Join US for COCktailS Mon. thru Sun 

uining Room Available 

for Functions 
Saturday & Sunday - Day or Night 

Now accepting Reservations for 
Bowling Banquets, Retirement Parties, 
Anniversaries, Weddings and Showers 

Call 472-8479 Ask fo. Mark 



John Kerrigan's School of Drumming 
Presents Its Second Annual 

Concert - Recital 

Sunday July 19, 1981 at 12:30 P.M. 

Atlantic Junior High School 
86 Mollis Avenue, No. Quincy, Mass. 



Admission $3.50 

Send money order or check to: 

John Horrigan 

12 GoddardSt. 
Quincy, Mass. 021 69 or Call 472-6672 

Admission $4.50 At Door 
Bands/Refreshments 




♦ • 



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A Tradition in North Quincy for 50 Years . 

Restaurant | 

9 Billings Road 
North Quincy 

328-5455 

Open 7 Days a Week 

Featuring 

LUNCHEON SPECIALS 
$2.25 to $4.25 

DAILY I 

DINNER SPECIALS | 

THURS. EVENING 
OUR FAMOUS 
N.E. BOILED DINNER | 
FRI. EVENING 
FISHERMAN'S PLATTER | 

Dinner Served 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

Sun. Wed. 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

3 

Gentle mens Bar Salad Bar 

Idinner meals only) 



• irMllt IlltU 



member 

IS 



SlHUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIfR 



Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 1981 




Special Features 



Grubby 



By Warren Sattler 




GRANDPA'S BOY 



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word. Then circle A, B or C for the cor- 
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3 Correct-Good 1-0 Correct-Poor 



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WEEK OF: JULY 2 

AQUARIUS - January 21 February 19 

Caring friends can help you over a hurdle, but you must be willing to 
ask for assistance. Organizational work rather than a creative job is 
your current specialty. 

PISCES - February 20 March 20 

By being less possessive you can improve an already good relation- 
ship an*d amaze an already impressed employer. Weekend activities 
can be more physically demanding than expected. 

ARIES - March 21 April 20 

Remember the advice you've been giving lovelorn friends? You may 
try taking a dose of it yourself. On the job, you could be nominated for 
a significant award. 

TAURUS - April 21-May 22 

Cooperative endeavors bring about satisfying results, and it's a good 
week for entering into sharing arrangements. Financial prospects start 
blooming by Monday or Tuesday. 

GEMINI - May 23-June 21 

Your own little world is the scene of the week s happiest adventures. 
Personal history is important now; look for new ways to carry on old 
traditions. 

CANCER - June 22 July 22 

Raise the standards of a friend rather than allow him/her to lower 
your own sights. If planning a trip, determine whether It's rest oi 
recreation that you're after. 

LEO - July 23 August 22 

Enterprising Leo makes a lot out of precious little this week. General- 
ly, opt for bright colors and bold touches, and try hard not to resist 
change . 

VIRGO - August 23-September 22 

Charm gets you through most of the week's career-related trouble 
spots. Clear up romantic misunderstandings — there will be a few this 
weekend — the moment you spot them. 

LIBRA - September 23-October 22 

A week In which recreation becomes hard work — and work becomes 
fun and games. Colleagues are more amiable, neighbors more 
demanding, and loved one more cautious than usual. 

SCORPIO - October 23 -November 21 
Not the best week for starting a diet or launching a big project. Much 
better now to conclude small tasks, shape long-term goals, and let 
loved one pamper you. 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22 December 22 

Appreciation from higherups helps boost your morale and even perks 
up a sagging relationship. Unusual ideas prove ultimately successful. 
so file them away for the future. 

CAPRICORN - December 23 January 20 

A tempting opportunity may not work out because of personal obliga- 
tions. Modest windfall or bonus favored for Monday-Tuesday. Earthy 
tones suit your present moods. 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

Ruled by the heart, you're highly romantic and quite emotional. 
Long-range thinking is accented this year; plans made now will affect 
you over the next decade. An important alliance may be formed late 
in 1981. 

BORN THIS WEEK 

July 2nd, actor Brock Peters; 3rd, director Ken Russell; 4th, actor 
George Murphy; 5th, circus master P.T. Barnum; 6th, actress Janet 
Leigh; 7th, singer Ringo Starr; 8th, singer Billy Eckstine. 



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Thursday, July 2. 1981 Quincy Sun Page 21 



Business/Real Estate 



.57 Million Increase 



Quincy Cooperative Assets 
Up 6.7%, Herbert Reports 



Assets of the Quincy Coopera- 
tive Bank have reached 
$1.37.070,000, up $8,570,000 from 
last year, a growth of 6.7%, 
President John R. Herbert told 
shareholders at the annual 
meeting last week. 

This means that over the last 
six years the assets of the bank 
increased $54 million dollars for a 
growth figure of 65%. Herbert 
said. 

Other indications of the bank's 
growth reported to the share- 
holders were its total of 
$1.. 134.000.000 in transactions, a 
considerable increase over last 
year. 

Its total interest payment to 
customers of $9,309,110 was up 
$1,737,802, an increase of 22.9% 

Shareholders reelected Heslip 
E. Sutherland, retired director 
and former president of the bank, 
as clerk of the cororation. 

Also re-elected were directors 
David J. Coleman, Dominic R. 




JOHN R. HERBERT 



Tedeschi and Francis J. Mitchell. 

In his annual report, Herbert 
discussed the bouncing interest 
rate illustrated by highs and lows 
in 26-week certificate rates of 
7.75% to 15.78% in 12 months. 

The worst effect of this wide 



swing in rates, he said, was to 
families seeking mortgages to 
buy homes. As rates peaked, 
many could not afford to enter the 
housing market. Some who did 
secure mortgages found that their 
banks had sold the loans. 

" I hrough good planning in our 
investment of shareholders' 
dollars," Herbert said, "We have 
not been in the position of having 
to sell our mortgage loans." 

"For the past fiscal year, wc 
wrote $14,307,916.66 worth of 
mortgages. There are two 
comments that should be made on 
this figure. 

"The first is that the available 
interest rate was approximately 
two percentage points over the 
preceding year, and the second 
thing is that for a very large part 
of the year we were offering the 
lowest interest rate of any bank 
around. 

"In other words, we did our 
best to make mortgages 
available." 



Multibank Raises Quarterly Dividend 10% 



The Board of Directors of 
Multibank Financial Corp. 
announces a 10 per cent increase 
in its quarterly cash dividend. 

Zooleck 

NEACCE 

Second V.P. 

Ronald E. Zooleck. CCE. ' 
executive vice-president of the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce, was elected second 
vice-president of the New England 
Association of Chamber of 
Commerce Executives (NEACCE) 
at its recent summer conference. 

NEACCE is the professional 
organization for Chamber of 
Commerce professionals in New 
England and has over 200 
members from the six New 
England states. It has been in 
existence since 1911. providing 
educational and informational 
services and programs for its 
members. Zooleck's responsibil- 
ities will include program 
professional development 
providing training programs in 
economics, communications, 
finances, business leadership and 
training. 

Zooleck is the chief executive 
officer of the South Shore 
Chamber and has served on the 
group's Executive Board. He has 
been in the Chamber profession 
for 19 years, beginning in 
Connecticut where he served as 
President of the Connecticut 
Association. He presently serves as 
a member of the Board of 
Directors and as Treasurer for the 
Mass. Association of Chamber of 
Commerce Executives (MACCE). 



The new rate is 44 cents per 
share compared to 40 cents per 
share in the prior quarter. The 
dividend is payable July 20, to 
shareholders of record July 10, 
1981. This increase represents an 
annual dividend rate of $1.76 per 
share compared with the previous 
per share annual rate of $1 .60. 

David B. Lynch, Chairman and 
President, said: "We are pleased 
that this further increase in the 
dividend rate is made possible by 
Multibank's continued 

progress." 



Multibank Financial Corp. is a 
registered bank holding company 
with seven member banks - 
Durfee Attleboro Bank in Bristol 
County, The Falmouth National 
Bank in Barnstable County; First 
Agricultural Bank in Berkshire 
County; Mechanics Bank in 
Worcester County; Northampton 
National Bank in Hampshire 
County; Security National Bank in 
Hampden County; and South 
Shore Bank in Norfolk County; as 
well as other affiliated divisions 
and subsidiaries. 



NOTICE 




1372 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY SQ. 

Office 
Will Be Closed On Saturdays 

During July and August. 

Newscarriers Should Pay Their 

Bills Monday thru Friday. 




1 

For Home 
Delivery- 
Call 471-3100 

Tl»«- Quincy Sixxi 

i,7«„ M.„' Bumc) W«». |«I7| 471-3100 j 



ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 

COPIERS?, 

Call us for a 

FREE 
DEMONSTRATION 

0FTHESCM c ™ R 

QUINCY 

Typewriter Service 

5 Maple St., Quincy Sq. 472-3656 




We service what we sell. 



Dick Cahill Joins 
Million Dollar Club 



Dick Cahill, vice president of the 
five-office Quincy division of Jack 
Conway. Realtor, has earned 
membership in the Million Dollar 
Aruba Club by selling 25 per cent 
of the deluxe condominiums at 100 
(irandview Ave. 

Cahill personally sold 13 of the 
$43,000 and up condos which, 
alona with sales of single-family 
Quincy homes ranging up to 

$80,000, put his total sales and 
listings at $1,071,250. 

He attributed his success to 
"being able to anticipate the 
growth of the condo market here 
which dovetails readily with the 
new life-style of young singles, 
both married and unmarried, as 
well as senior citizens, who can 
afford this type of housing." 

Only 1 4 condos are left in the 53- 
unit complex. 

Cahill has been with the Conway 
company since 1975 and was 
named vice president of the Quincy 
division in 1979. 

He is also second vice president 
of the Quincy and South Shore 
Board of Realtors and is co- 
chairman of its Multiple Listing 
System (MLS) Committee, and 
chairman of its Professional 
Standards Committee. 

A coach for the girls' softball 




* 



DICK CAHILL 

league of the Koch Club, he is also 
an instructor in Massachusetts real 
estate law at the Conway 
Company's licensing school in 
Hanover. 

A million-dollar-a-year 
producer for Conway since 1976, 
he has now won a free, all-expense- 
paid trip for a week to Aruba. 

He and his wife, Carol, live in 
Quincy with their daughter, Joan. 



James Cosseboom Promoted 
At The Kendall Co. 



James A. Cosseboom of 
Wollaston has been named 
controller for the Polyken Division 
of The Kendall Co., a subsidiary 
of Colgate-Palmolive Co., that 
makes hospital supplies and 
specialty industrial products. 

Cosseboom, a graduate of 
Bentley College who studied at 
Cornell, will be responsible for 



budgeting and market forecasting 
and will aid in long-range 
financial planning for the 
industrial tape business. 

Before joining Kendall in 1967, 
he held financial positions in the 
food distribution field. At 
Kendall, he filled various 
accounting jobs and served as 
senior financial analyst. 



FIRST timi orrutD 
GUttRM HOSPitm 





BEAUTIFULLY DESIGNED PENDANT 

CRAFTED IN 14 KT. GOLD OR 

STERLING SILVER WITH 18" 

FINE ROPE CHAIN 

COMPARABLY PRICED AT $69.95 

14-KT. Gold Pendant and Chain $39.95 

Gold Pendant Only $22.75 

Sterling Pendant and Chain $9.95 

(not available separately) 



COUPON 

Send Check or Money Order To: 

B & M FINE CHAIN DISTRIBUTORS 

P.O. BOX 189 
No. Easton, Ma. 02356 

Please send Pendant (s) 

D 14K Gold Pendant W/Chain 
□ 14K Gold Pendant Only 
D Sterling Pendant W/Chain 

Name . . 



Street __ 
City _ 



Zip 



Please include $1.75 for postage and delivery 
5% Sales Tax for Mass. Residents 

ALLOW 3 to 5 Weeks For Delivery 



Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 1981 



Quincy Junior College's new 
Summer Session II will begin on 
July 13 and run for three weeks 
until July 30, an innovative and 
compact version of many of QJCs 
fine course offerings. 

Summer Session II consists of 
evening classes to be held on 
Mondays, Wednesdays, and 
Thursdays, from 6-10 p.m. for 
only three weeks. The academic 
requirements for these courses 
will be similar to courses offered 
during the school year but 
students will have a chance to 
complete them in a shorter and 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 84F1783E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GEORGE D. DALTON late 
of Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that MARY F. DALTON of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executrix named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/12/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Fsquire, First Judge o( said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-fifth day of 
June in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81M0580D1 

MICHAFL J. STARCK Plaintiff 
vs. ANDRFA J. STARCK Defendant. 
Summons by Publication. 

To the above-named Defendant: 

A complaint has been presented to 
this Court by your spouse, Michael J. 
Starck, seeking a divorce. 

You are required to serve upon 
Jeffrey Lee Levin, plaintiffs 
attorney, whose address is 875 
Southern Artery, Quincy, MA., your 
answer on or before 5th day of 
August, 1981. If you fail to do so, 
the Court will proceed to the hearing 
and adjudication of this action. You 
are also required to file a copy of 
your answer in the office of the 
Register of this Court at Dedham. 

Witness, ROBERT M. LORD, 
Esq., First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, June 1, 1981. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
6/18-25 7/2/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 811 16641 1 

Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GEORGE D. DAVIDSON 
late of Quincy, in the County of 
Norfolk. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that ELLA R. DAVIDSON of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executrix named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 7/29/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Fsquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the fifteenth day of June 
in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 



QJC Summer Session II Starts July 13 



more intensive period ot time. 

The following courses are being 
offered during Summer Session 
II: 

Basic Mathematics, Principles 
of Algebra, College Math II, 
Principles of Physical Science II, 
General Chemistry II (M, T, W, & 
Th), General Psychology, 
Contemporary Social Problems, 
American Government, United 
States History II, Advanced 
Drawing, Advanced Painting. 

LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. II Fl 721 El 

Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOHN S. MALMGREN late 
of Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will and codicil of said 
deceased praying that VERA E. 
MALMGREN of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
Executrix named in the will without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/5/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Fsquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Eighteenth day of June 
in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty -one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 

COMMONWEALTH 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81M0826-D2 

LANA KING Plaintiff vs. 
WILLIAM KING Defendant. 

Summons by Publication. 

To the above-named Defendant: 

A complaint has been presented to 
this Court by your spouse, Lana 
King, seeking a divorce for cruel and 
abusive treatment, custody of minor 
child, support. 

You are required to serve upon 
Nancy Lorenz, Greater Boston Legal 
Services, plaintiff's attorney, whose 
address is 85 Devonshire Street, 
Boston, MA 02109, your answer on 
or before 16th day of September, 
1981. If you fail to do so, the Court 
will proceed to the hearing and 
adjudication of this action. You are 
also required to file a copy of your 
answer in the office of the Register 
of this Court at Dedham. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esq., First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, June 16, 1981. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
6/25 7/2-9/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81IT512G1 
Notice of Appointment 

To Leon Constantineau of parts 
unknown and all persons interested 
in the estate of DONNA 
CONSTANTINEAU of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. NOTICE; 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter praying 
that ELLEN CONSTANTINEAU of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Guardian of Minor with 
custody, with sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, your or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/12/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. LORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Twenty-sixth day of 
May in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
6/18-25 7/2/81 



English Composition I, English 
Composition II, American 
Literature II, Advanced Creative 
Writing, Principles of Economics 
I, Principles of Economics II, 
Fundamentals of Accounting I, 
Fundamentals of Accounting II, 
Basic Programming, Principles of 

LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81F1536E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of PHILIP J. GUNDERSON 
late of Quincy, in the County of 
Norfolk. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that GALE G. GUNDERSON of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executrix named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
"allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 7/15/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-ninth day of 
May in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
6/18-25 7/2/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 811T725E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of WINIFRED K. RUSSELL 
late of Quincy, in the County of 
Norfolk. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that RONALD T. RUSSELL of Old 
Orchard Beach, Maine, be appointed 
Executor named in the will without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/5/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Fsquire, first Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Eighteenth day of June 
in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
6/25 7/2-9/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81F1653E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES F. McCARTHY, JR. 
also known as JAMES F. 
McCARTHY late of Quincy, in the 
County of Norfolk. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that PAUL J. McCARTHY of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executor named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 7/29/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, first Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Tenth day of June in 
the Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
6/18-25 7/2/81 



Business Management, Business 
Law II, Introduction to Word 
Processing (M & W, 6-9:30 p.m.). 
Microprocessors and Micro- 
computers, and Introduction to 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 77M0906-D2 

SHERRI A. CONNELLY Plaintiff 
vs. PAUL W. CONNELLY 
Defendant. Summons by Publication. 

To the above-named Defendant: 

A complaint has been presented to 
this Court by your spouse, Sherri A. 
Connelly, seeking to dissolve the 
bonds of matrimony, for alimony 
and for custody of and allowance for 
minor children. 

You are required to serve upon 
Thomas M. Barron, plaintiffs! 
attorney, whose address is 1372 
Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
your answer on or before August 5, 
1981. If you fail to do so, the Court 
will proceed to the hearing and 
adjudication of this action. You are 
also required to file a copy of your 
answer in the office of the Register 
of this Court at Dedham. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esq., First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham June 19, 1981. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 



7/2-9-16/81 



Criminal Justice. 

For further information call 
Richard Mula, Dean of 
Continuing Education, at 

786-8741. 

LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81F1640A1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOSEPH E. GATELY late 
of Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. NOTICE 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter praying 
that MARIE C. GATELY of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Administratrix without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 7/29/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the ninth day of June in the 
Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 



6/25 7/2-9/81 
INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

QUINCY CITY HALL 

1305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering to the City of 
Quincy: 

Planning Dept. Smoke Detectors July 21, 1981 at 11:00 A. M. 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing Agent, 
Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration and will be received at the 
office of the Purchasing Agent until the time and date stated above, at which 
time and date they will be publicly opened and read. 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the sealed envelope is to 
be clearly marked, "BID ENCLOSED" with time/date of bid call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept any part of a bid 
or the one deemed best for the City. 

Arthur H. Tobin, Mayor 
William J. Kelly, Purchasing Agent 
7/2/81 

INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

QUINCY CITY HALL 

1305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering to the City of 
Quincy: 

C.E.T.A. Janitorial Supplies July 21, 1981 at 9:30 A.M. 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing Agent, 
Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration and will be received at the 
office of the Purchasing Agent until the time and date stated above, at which 
time and date they will be publicly opened and read. 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the sealed envelope is to 
be clearly marked, "BID ENCLOSED" with time/date of bid call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept any part of a bid 
or the one deemed best for the City. 

Arthur H. Tobin, Mayor 
William J. Kelly, Purchasing Agent 
7/2/81 

INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

QUINCY CITY HALL 

1305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering to the City of 
Quincy: 

School Dept. RE-BID - Custodial Paints 

Welding Supplies 
Drafting Supplies 
Paper Products - 

Print Shop 
Bread Rolls 
Health Dept. Dental Supplies 

Hospital Dept. Continuous Strength 

Compression Hip 
System 
RE-BID -China/ 

Silverware 
RE-BID -Isotope 
Supplies 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing Agent, 
Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169. 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the sealed envelope is to 
be clearly marked, "BID ENCLOSED" with time/date of bid call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept any part of a bid 
or the one deemed best for the City. 

Arthur H. Tobin, Mayor 
William J. Kelly, Purchasing Agent 
7/2/81 



July 20, 1981 at 9:30 A.M. 
July 20, 1981 at 10:00 A. M. 
July 20, 1981 at 10:30 A.M. 
July 20, 1981 at 11:00 A. M. 

July 21, 1981 at 10:00 A.M. 
July 21, 1981 at 10:30 A.M. 
July 22, 1981 at 10:00 A. M. 



July 22, 1981 at 10:30 A.M. 
July 22, 1981 at 11:00 A.M. 



Thursday, Jul) 2. 1981 Quincy Sun Pagt 23 



» CLASSIFIED ADS! 



HELP WANTED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



Ambitious People 

Do you have management or 
leaching skills? Are you tired of 
working for someone else? Are you 
interested in health and nutrition? 
Would you like an opportunity to 
be finanically secure working part- 
time? If so call - 696-1713. 

7 9 



FOR SALE 



1973 Hardtop Gran 
Torino 

Good Condition 

471-3100 
9 a.m. - 6 p.m. T.F, 



1978 Dodge Van 

BI00 6 cyl. automatic, power 
steering, new radial tires, 27.000, 
camping interior, captain seats, one 
owner. $4900. Call 471-9331. 

7 2 

Waterbeds 

New Queen or King Size Waterbed, 
never opened. 10 year waranty, 
walnut stained pine frame, 
headboard, deck, pedestal, 
mattress, liner, heater. Originally 
$330.00, now $199.00. 828-1662, 
Canton. 

8 20 



D M SO 

Miracle of the Wood organic. 
Distributed by St. Marks Inc. 464 
(iranite Ave, Milton, Mass. 617- 
698-0223. 

7 2 



1981 Graduation 
Photos For Sale 

laken June 9th Quincy High and 
Quincy Vo lech. Contact 
photography by James 773-9367. 
Mon. thru sun. 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. 

7 2 



WANTED 



Nancy's Nook 
537 Sea Street 

(2 minutes from Police Station) 
We are interested in selling the 

following on consignment. 

Infants, children's, teens and 

women's clothing in excellent 

condition. 

Also baby furniture and Arts & 

Crafts. Turn your articles into 

cash by bringing them in for 

consignment. 

Closed for vacation July 18th 

thru July 29th. Accepting fall 

consignments July 7th. 



Transportation 
Wanted 

Mon. thru Fri. weekly from 
Houghs Neck to New England 
Medical Center. Time flexible. Call 
47 1 -04 1 9 773-29 1 8. 

7,2 

PERSONALS 

Thank You St. Jude 

For 2 favors granted. 

7/ 2 




Youplai 
leading role 

in our fight against 
support birth defects 
MARCH OF DIMES 



JAY'S 

TREE REMOVAL 

DONE BY TRAINED 
EXPERIENCED PERSONNEL 
Free Estimates 
LOW Fully Insured 

LOW 
RATES 

CALL AFTER 4 P. 

843-6115 




Windows Washed 

Home or Apartment. Inside or out. 
Call for a free estimate. 47I-5M 1 

7 2 

CRAYONS 

Family Day Care 

loving home. Fun. Learning 
enriched environment. Licensed 
provider and full time assistant. For 
more info please call 



471-4674 



7/2 



Responsible Mother 

In W. Quincy wants child to care 
for days, starting September. Call 
471-6293 during day. 

7/2 



INSTRUCTION 

Piano instruction and 
Music Theory 

First Lesson FREE. Louise 
Grabowski, B. Mus. Ed., Berklee 
College of Music. 770-4060. 
Quincy, MA. 

7 2 

Dance Lessons 

Summer workshop, courses offered 
in Ballet, Ja/z, Mime and Yoga, 
two's Compam Dunce Studio. 
Braintrce. Call '843-2034 or 335- 

7492. 



Guitar Lessons 

By professional guitarist and 
teacher. All styles, all ages. 773- 
3588. 

7 M) 

Music Lessons 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 

BRASS REEDS 
WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER 
27 Beale St., Wollaston 
Call 773-5325 

Skills Advancement 
Center 

Individualized remedial & 
enrichment programs (K-12). 
Increase skill proficiency in 
reading, writing. & math. Joyce. 
479-4084. 

7.2 



Steve's Landscaping 
Service 

All types of lawn care services and 

related landscape planning done at 

reasonable costs. Sod work, tree 

removal, bushes trimmed and 

mulched etc. 

FREE ESTIMATES Call 328- 

3361. 

7 4 

Country Fence 

All types of cedar fence installed. 
Post and Rail 6F Stockade spaced 
picket. Free estimates. Call Steve 
471-0884. 

7 2 

GLASS WORK 

Table tops - plexiglas tinted & clear. 
Mirrors installed clear and 
goldvein. Screens, storm windows 
& sashes repaired. 7 days. Call 328- 
7132 or 426-7989. Gene. 
7 23 

"Tunerville Trolley" 

(ONE-MAN BAND) 

Yesteryear's answer for music and 
entertainment and your extra- 
special occasions. Call 773-3588. 

7 23 



Wollaston Fuel & Burner Service 



WE SERVICE 

oil burners 
oil heating systems 
gas heating systems 
all motor & controls 
all hot water problems 
air conditioning 

773-3443 

42 St. Ann's Road 

AN AUTHORIZED 



WE INSTALL 



oil burners 

oil fired boilers 

gas fired boilers 

enertrol-computor 

energy savings - vent damper 

oil burners cleaned 
President Jerry LaFlamme 
Former Serviceman of 
General Automatic Heating 



ENERTR0L DEALER „„ 

All Work Guaranteed ' / - 



BOB'S ODD JOBS 

Rubbish Removal 

Hauling & Moving 

Landscaping 

Interior Exterior Painting 

General Home Maintenance 

A Repairs 

Many other services 

Free Estimates Very Reasonable 

472-086S Nights & Weekends 



Atlantic 

CARPET t UPHOLSTERY CLEANING SPECIALISTS 




CARPETS and UPHOLSTERY 
CLEANED 

IN YOUR HOME/OFFICE 



• VELVETS TAPESTRIES 

> HAITIANS. HERCULONS 

• ALL OTHtn FABRICS 



• ORIENTALS 

• WALL 10 WALL CARPETS 

• PICKUPADCLIVERV 



WATER DAMAGE 

FREE ESTIMATES 

471-3142 



WALTER J. McLEAN 



HARRY'S 

MOWER & ENGINE REPAIR 
used mowers- Bought-Sold. I REE 
I'ickup & Del. Quincy Area. 
REASONABLE RATES 773- 
4372 

Eager Beaver 

Tree Service 

Experience At 

Low Rates 

Pruning - Cutting - Removal. Lots 
eleared. Eree estimates. Serving 
South Shore area. Call Cliff at 767- 
0359. 7 1 6 



Need Help With Your 
Writing? 

Call Ed Wyckoff. 479-8399 (after 6 
p.m.) Ereelance editor. Harvard 
BA, SlO/hr, Satisfaction 
guaranteed 

7 9 

Hall For Hire 

Weddings, showers, meetings, 
banquets. Elks Home. I220 
Hancock St., Quincy. 

472-2223 t.f. 



Reliable Floor Service 

Hardwood floor sanding. 
Specialists since I962. Poly- 
Urethane. Free Est. 335-5509. X |J 



MOORE'S PAINTING 

INTERIOR -EXTERIOR 

FREE ESTIMATES 
High Quality - Low Cost 

Experienced - Insured 

Call Rory- 925-1248 



Keys Made 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

86 Washington St., Quincy 
479-5454 



T.F. 



A&T VACUUM 

Repair Specialists On All Makes 

• FREE Pickup, 
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• Belts, Bags, Hoses all vacs 

• New, used. Rebuilt vacs 

• $9.95 special 
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only on carry in 
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• Electrolux Bags 

(14 Pkg $4.29- 5 Pkg $1.59) 
25 Beale St. Wollaston - 479-5066 
357A Wash. St. Braintree- 848-S476 

T.F. 




Your South Shore 

Headquarters 

For 

Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE & APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St . So Quincy 
472-1710 if 




Wallpapering 

Experienced, neat, clean and 
courteous service. Call 328-6277. 

7 If. 

HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a basic 
Homeowner's policv for $30,000 
and are paying more than$l48.(M) a 
year. Call 479-4242 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency. T.F. 

Hall For Rent 

North Quincy K. of C. Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. For information please 

ca " 328-0087 t.f. 



Larry's 



Home Repair 

Interior - exterior painting, scroll 
ceilings, gutters, roof repairs, and 
property maintenance. 328-8735, 
659-7471. 



MITCHELL M. KHOURI 
Oriental Rug Cleaning 

Specialists in hand cleaning repairs, 

fringing, reweaving & appraisals 

Rugs Bought/Sold/Traded 

Free Pick-up & delivery 

7/2 479-8303 



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We have a trailer of Cellulose Class 
I available. Rent blower or pour in 
place. THE DR Insulation Co., 600 
Southern Artery, Quincy, next to 
Duane's. 471-5777 

9,30 



INDEX FOR 
CLASSIFIED 

CHECK ONE 

□ Services 
D For Sale 

□ Autos 

□ Boats 

□ For Rent 

D Help Wanted 

□ Pets, Livestock 

□ Lost and Found 

D Real Estate for Sale 
G Real Estate Wanted 

□ Miscellaneous 

□ Work Wanted 
[j Antiques 

Q Coins and Stamps 

□ Rest Homes 

□ Instruction 




MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN. 1372 Hancock St.. Quincy 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Cash must accompany order 



E nclosed is 



for the following ad to run times 



COPY: 



$3.20 for one week, up to 20 words, 5i each additional word 
$3.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions 

of the same ad ... 54 each additonal word. 
$2.80 per week up to 20 words, for ten or more insertions 

of the same ad. 
No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of cancellation 

Deadline: Tuesday, noon 

Please include your phone number in ad. 



Single Rate: 
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1 ' 



Pace 24 Quincy Sun Thursday , July 2. 1981 



School Committee To Sue Over Budget Issue 



By FRANK MORTIMER Mayor Arthur H. Tobin for failing 

The School Committee is suing to place its budget before the City 



CHURCH'S 

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234 Billings Road 



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Pillows Cleaned, Fluffed, 
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Council for approval. 

Committeeman Frank 

Anselmo's motion to sue was 
seconded by Committeewoman 
Joan Picard and approved 
unanimously. Member John J. 
Sullivan was absent. 

The decision came during last 
week's school committee 
meeting. 

"No mayor has the power to be 
a one-man dictator for the School 
Committee," Anselmosaid. 

School Supt. Lawrence P. 
Creedon supported the motion. 

"I believe it's very important 
the School Committee does this," 
he said. "Otherwise 1 don't see 
what point there is in having a 
school committee." 

"I think it's important you 
initiate legal action now. If the tax 
rate gets set it will appear the 



school committee has accepted 
the (mayor and City Council's) 
action." 

Creedon also opposed deleting 
six security jobs and 13 teaching 
positions in art, music, and 
physical education that were 
included in the committee's 
budget at a cost of $300,000. 

"If you take any action to cut 
that, it will appear you recognize 
and support the action of the City 
Council," he told the committee. 

The School Committee's $28.4 
million proposed budget 
exceeded Tobin's $26.7 recom- 
mendation when the committee 
voted to pay $1.4 million in raises 
owed to school employees as well 
as to save the teaching and 
security positions. 

The City Council approved 
Tobin's lower budget June 15 as 



i 



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328-9811 



N. Quincy j 



$10 OVEN CLEANED $10 
$14 RUGS CLEANED per room $14 

Bob's Oven Cleaning Service 773-8171 



r 









i 



^ 




v *'' p ' f ^wtWmimmuimi^- 



bank to meet 
the challenges 

of the 80%. 



Even though the economy during 1980 was volatile and un- 
predictable, the South Boston Savings Bank, Massachusetts' 
highest earning savings bank, continued to grow. To see our 
strength, just look at our financial summary. 



FINANCIAL SUMMARY 



Assets 



October 31 (millions) 

1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 

S459.2 S436.4 S399 S365 2 S325.6 



Deposits S421.3 S409 8 S373 .4 S325 2 $295 3 

Mortgages and 

Mortgage-backed 

Securities S329 7 S315 3 S262 7 $245 6 S199.9 

Other 

investments S123 1 S120 3 S123 7 S1 12 9 $118 3 

Capital 

Accounts S24 2 S23 7 S 21 6 $20 7 S17 7 

Operating 

Expenses S43 S46 S35 $30 S28 

Net Income* S5.7 $60 $57 S45 S3. 4 

Before Taxes 



^ 



% change 
1976-1980 

t-41.0% 

•42.7% 



64.9°o 
4.1% 

36 7% 

53 6% 
67 6°,, 



In 1980, interest paid depositors rose to a new high of 
$34.5 million. Assets increased 5.2% to $459 million. 
And deposits were up to 2.8% to $421.3 million. South 
Boston Savings Bank's growth continues, thanks to our 
depositors and their expanding needs. 
Assets comprised residential and commercial mortgage 
loans in Boston, the surrounding area, and across the 
country. Plus government, municipal and corporate 
securities and money market instruments. 
These assets give the South Boston Savings Bank the 
strength to meet the ongoing challenges of the 1980s. 
The record of growth and reliability South Boston Sav- 
ings Bank started in 1863 continues with our commit- 
ment to improve service to the public in the years ahead. 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

"- •'ALWAYS THE LEADER'' 



Main Office: 460 West Broadway 

South Boston, Tel. 268-2500 

NEPONSET CIRCLE • QUINCY 



'J 



part of a $66.4 million city 
spending package. 

Tobin had sent the School 
Committee's budget to the City 
Council with a recommendation 
that it approve only the $26.7 
million "spending allowance" he 
submitted for the schools in 
February. 

But Tobin never issued an 
appropriation order for the 
committee's budget, thereby 
making it impossible for the 
council to approve more than his 
own S26.7 million budget. 

The council can cut a budget 
but cannot add without a mayoral 
appropriation order. 

Members of the School 
Committee expressed concern 
last week over how the schools 
will get a share of any additonal 
state aid coming to the city. 

The committee unanimously 
approved a motion by Mrs. Picard 
to ask the mayor and City Council 
to give the schools a percentage 
of any additional state aid. 

There was debate over what 
that percentage should be. Dr. 
Creedon said that since schools 
spend about 45 per cent of city 
funds, the same percentage of 
additional state aid should go to 
schools. 

"They're going to laugh at 
that," advised Committeewoman 
Patricia Toland. Mrs. Picard 
decided to move that the schools 
receive state aid in proportion to 
the depth of cuts in its budget -- 
about 20 per cent. 

Mrs. Picard asked that copies 
of the request be sent to all city 
departments "so they don't think 
we're putting a fast one over on 
them." 

The committee's concern over 
its share in expected local aid was 
spurred by reports that the city 
intends to use all additional aid to 
make up part of a $6.2 million 
deficit in the city budget passed 
by the City Council June 15. 

Acting City Auditor William 
Grindlay confirmed Monday the 
city's intention to use all 
additional state aid to offset part 
of the deficit. 

School Committeewoman Mary 
Collins strongly criticized the 
council for appropriating more 
money than the city can collect in 
taxes under Prop 2Vi. 

"I think that it is the most 
fiscally irresponsible move the 
City Council ever made," she 
said during the School Committee 
meeting. "The City Council 
should have made the cuts, then 
if the state aid came, restore the 
jobs. 

"This is what the School 
Committee did." 

King Invited 

To Sign 

Bills Here 

Sen. Paul D. Harold, on behalf 
of the Quincy legislative 
delegation, has invited Gov. 
Edward J. King to the city to sign 
bills creating revolving accounts 
for City Hospital and Quincy 
Junior College. 

Harold said it could happen as 
soon as July 9. 

Legislation setting up the 
revolving accounts that would free 
the hospital and the junior colelge 
from the municipal budget is 
expected to clear the Legislature in 
a matter of days. 

Harold said the junior college 
bill has passed both the House and 
the Senate and is expected to be on 
the governor's desk momentarily. 
The hospital bill has passed the 
Senate and House approval is 
expected shortly. 

Harold said he has spoken to 
Gov. King and. while the governor 
did not say he will sign the bills, he 
appeared to be "favorably 
disposed." 

Both bills will be effective 
retroactively to July 1 when they 
are enacted. 



i 



24-Page Historic 



(V 1 1; v 



jovi °V 



* A'ou'i 1,1 



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ement Inside 





Questions Raised But: 

Less Hostility 

To East- West 

Connector 



By TOM HENSHAW 

"There is less opposition than ever before," said 
Bernard Reisberg, president of the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional Association, "but there are 
still things that have to be proven to us." 



S1PPITY-DO-DA — Sharing a can of soda al the Koch Club's 34th annual picnic recently at Pageant Field 
were, from left. Amy Strout, 9; Julie Strout, 2; Katie Johnson, 3; and Christine McGee, 8. 

Aug. 18 Deadline For Papers 

City Election Shaping Up As 
One Of Most Hotly Contested 



With nearly six weeks 
remaining in which to qualify for 
a place on the ballot, the city 
election in the fall appears ready 
to become one of the most hotly 
contested in years. 

Already preliminary contests 
are indicated for mayor, for the 
three at-large seats on the City 
Council, for the three openings on 
the six-member School Com- 
mittee, and for the Ward 2 City 
Council seat. 

The preliminary election is 
Sept. 22. 

In the race for mayor, provided 
they file their papers with 50 valid 
signatures before the Aug. 18 
deadline, are two members of the 
City Council and a political 
unknown. 

Councillors Francis X. 
McCauley, 51, of 210 Manet 



Ave., Houghs Neck, and Daniel 
G. Raymondi, 33, of 88 Elm St., 
Quincy Center, will be the big 
vote-getters in any preliminary 
balloting. 

The man who will make the 
preliminary election necessary is 
John T. Isbister, 43. of 77 
Cleverly Court, Quincy Point, the 
third man in the race. 

Incumbent Mayor Arthur H. 
Tobin is not expected to run for 
re-election to a third two-year 
term. He reportedly is awaiting 
appointment by Gov. Edward J. 
King as clerk-magistrate of 
Quincy District Court. 

Prospective candidates have 
until Friday, Aug. 14, to take out 
nomination papers. 

Ten candidates are already in 
the field for the three at-large 
seats on the Council, including 
incumbents John J. Quinn, 57, of 



86 Grandview Ave., Wollaston, 
and Joseph J. LaRaia, 48, of 54 
Grogan Ave., West Quincy. 

Quinn will be seeking his 12th 
two-year term on the Council and 
LaRaia, a former mayor, will be 
after a seventh term in a twice- 
interrupted string that dates back 
to the 1960-61 Council. 

The third incumbent, 

McCauley, is running for mayor. 

The field of 10, if all qualify and 

no more are added, will be the 

largest number of candidates for 

the Council at-large since 1967 

(Cont'd on Paw I) 



Members of the QCBPA 
listened to some of that proof 
Tuesday as the Planning 
Department sought to explain its 
proposed new route for the 
controversial East-West (or 
Revere Rd.) Connector. 

"I wish they wouldn't call it a 
connector," said Charles Pearce, 
president of the Quincy Savings 
Bank and chairman of Progress for 
Downtown Quincy, a supporter of 
the road. 

"It's an unfortunate choice of 
terms. A connector means 
something that connects two 
points and bypasses what is in 
between. What we're really talking 
about here is an exit. 

"I would rather see it called 'the 
Business District Exit' or 
something like that." 

The connector would cut across 
the downtown retail district from 
Granite St. to McGrath Highway, 
enabling traffic from the proposed 
Burgin Parkway Extension to exit 
into Quincy Center. 

The new plan would displace 13 
business establishments but would 
keep Hancock St. open for 
business while the connector is 
being built underneath it at the 
intersection of Revere Rd. 



'The new plan makes better sense 
than the old one," said Pearce. 
"Hancock St. is very much a part 
of the business district. I'd hate to 
see anything happen to it." 

The State Department of Public 
Works has scheduled a public 
hearing on the connector for 
Thursday, July 23, at 4:30 p.m. in 
the City Council chamber. 

"Let's build the connector now 
and forget about development on 
the east side of Hancock St. for the 
time being," said John Herbert, 
president of the Quincy 
Cooperative Bank. 

"When they tie the two together 
it creates a series of problems and 
opposition. We've got to have the 
street. So let's build it and the 
development will follow. 

"If we don't do it now, Hancock 
St. will die, and the Quincy 
shopping center will move to the 
Penn St. area between Gross man's 
and Capen's Bridge." 

"I'm enthusiastic about any 
solution that keeps Hancock St. 
open," said William Austin, 
president of the South Shore 
Bank. "1 believe in the connector 
but I'd hate to see the merchants 
get hurt. 

(Cont'd on Pan? 22) 



No New Auditor Until October 



Selection of a new auditor for 
Quincy has been postponed until 
some time in October. 

The six candidates for the post 
were notified this week by City 
Council President Leo J. Kelly 
that the appointment will not be 
made while the city is undergoing 
an outside audit and a new 
accounting system is being 
installed. 



"With these two projects 
currently ongoing in the city," 
said Kelly, "it is felt that this is 
not a good time to bring a new 
auditor onboard." 

Each was told that they would 
hear from Kelly again in the fall. 

The new auditor would succeed 
Charles L. Shea, who retired in 
March. William Grindlay has 
been acting auditor. 



SW Smoke Detector 
Program Meeting July 14 



A public meeting will be held 
Tuesday, July 14, at 7 p.m. in the 
Lincoln-Hancock School to 
explain the new smoke detector 
installation program that is being 
initiated in Southwest Quincy. 

The Planning Department will 
provide the detectors and have 
them installed in locations 
determined by the Fire Depart- 



ment under the federal 
Community Development Block 
Grant. 

Income guidelines range from a 
household of one with a maximum 
gross income of $14,500 to a 
family of eight or more with an 
income of $25,000. 

Applications will be distributed 
at the meeting. 




WINNERS OF "Best Idea Built On A Bike" at Atlantic Community Association's July 4th field day were, 
from left, Tracey Dunbrack, second place "Snoopy House"; Kerry MacDonald, third place, "Covered 
Wagon"; and Paula Connell, first place, "Good Humor Man." Event was held at Welcome Young 
Playground. 



P«fe 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 




With the price of gold, silver and diamonds at 

highest (or even declining) levels, now is the 

time to receive the most cash for yours 

We ve been serving Quincy and the 
South Shore since 1942. 



|ewelers 

1402 Hancock street •Quincy. Mass. 02160 

773-3636 

Open Thursday until 9 



GARDENS 




Landscape ServicedGardenCenter 



471-6868 

FRESH CORN 

Arriving this weekend in limited amounts. Please 
call ahead to reserve yours. Treat the family to a pre- 
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Best Varieties 

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Fresh & Full 



MICROPHONE to monitor Squantum's share of the noise made by airplanes taking off from Logan 
Airport is connected symbolically in the Squantum Community Center. Left to right, City Councillor 
Francis X. McCauley, Sen. Paul D. Harold, David Davis, executive director of Massport; Bernice Mader, 
chairman of Citizens Against Airport Noise; and Rep. Michael W. Morrissey . Real microphone is located on 
Bayside Rd., Squantum. 

(Quincy Sun I'hoto by Daw Gliloulyj 

Massport Mike To Measure 
Squantum Air Noise 



Massport placed a noise 
monitoring microphone next to 
the home of Faye Anderson, 127 
Bayside Rd., Squantum, last 
week to measure noise levels of 
jets departing from Runway 22R 
at Logan Airport. 

"It will provide the citizens of 
Squantum and their elected 
officials with a permanent record 
of noise exposure on the 
peninsula," said David W. Davis, 
executive director of Massport. 

"And it will provide Massport 
and the Federal Aviation Agency 
with information necessary to 
measure and analyze the 
effectiveness of the departure 
route that most effects 
Squantum." 

Bernice Mader, chairman of 



Citizens Against Airport Noise, 
called the microphone "exciting" 
but she warned that the fight for 
peace and quiet in Quincy is not 
yet over. 

"Very soon, Gov. King will get 
control of the Massport board," 
she said. "That is when the fight 
gets hotter. We all know where 
the governor stands on air noise -- 
he's above it." 

And she concluded by quoting 
Winston Churchill: "We will fight 
on the beaches ..." 

The microphone will be 
operative 24 hours a day, turning 
on and sending impulses to a 
computer at Logan Airport when- 
ever the noise level goes above 60 
decibels, the level of normal 
conversation. 



The location in Faye 
Anderson's yard is symbolic, 
since she is president of the 
Squantum Air Noise Committee 
and has complained loud and long 
about the noise of aircraft over 
Squantum. 

"She has a special place in my 
heart -- and in my ears," said 
Davis. 

The Squantum mike is the 17th 
in a ring of noise monitoring 
microphones that have been 
placed around Logan Airport as 
part of its noise monitoring 
system that was installed in 1975. 

Also attending the microphone 
ceremonies in the Squantum 
Community Center were Sen. 
Paul D. Harold, Rep. Michael W. 
Morrissey and City Councillor 
Francis X. McCauley. 



CALL ME BEFORE 
SOMETHING 



HAPPENS 



Joseph M. Doherty Insurance Agency, Inc 
518 Hancock Street, Quincy. 472-1224 
LIFE - BUSINESS ■ PERSONAL • AUTO 






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Take SI Ann i Road which it opposite tha malngata to Valcian t Stadium 

Open 7 Days — These cash n' carry prices good thru Sunday 



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• Eye exams arranged 
Open Daily 9-8 Sat. 9-5 

Closed Wed. Near Braintree MBTA Station 



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820 WASHINGTON ST., BRAINTREE 8430 121 



No Problems 

They Sleep 
Better With 
Fire Patrols 



Thursday, July 9, 1911 Quincy Sun Page 3 



There were no incidents, no 
problems," said Mrs. Michael 
Larkin, "but I think people slept a 
little better Monday night." 

That was the night that 
volunteer residents began 
patrolling the School and Granite 
Sts. area where an arsonist is 
believed to have touched off at 
least three, possibly four, fires in 
the past week. 

The patrols were organized by 
Michael Larkin, 192 School St., 
with some 28 to 30 persons keeping 
fire watch on the neighborhood 
while their neighbors are asleep. 

"We are patrolling basically 
from the time people go to bed at 
night until they get up in the 
morning," said Mrs. Larkin. "The 
people want to know that there is 
someone out there. 

"I can't tell you much about it. 
We are deliberately vague about 
details. We feel that if we publicize 
the patrols, where they will be and 
what time, it will defeat their 
purpose." 

She called the patrols "an 
extension of the eyes and the ears 
of the police." 

"If the patrols spot something, 
the police are called," said Mrs. 
Larking. "They do the professional 
work." 

A meeting has been scheduled 



for Monday, July 13, at 7:30 p.m. 
at the Fort Square Presbyterian 
Church to listen to a talk by 
Deputy Chief Carl Valenti on fire 
prevention. 

"These people are under- 
standably concerned," he said. 
"This is a serious problem." 

Deputy Valenti noted that there 
have been three suspicious fires in 
the area, the most serious a blaze 
that gutted a two-family house at 
171 School St. on July 1. 

The other two were set in a cellar 
window at 181 School St. and a 
back hall at 173 School St. Both 
were extinguished or burned out 
before any serious damage could 
be done. 

In addition, there was an 
attempt to burn a building at 176 
Granite St. Saturday night by 
piling rubbish against the side of 
the structure and setting it afire. 

Valenti said other fires were 
apparently set at Sid's Tuxedo 
Shop on Quincy Ave. across from 
Central Fire Station and in a 
garage at 197 Franklin St. but they 
appeared unconnected to the 
School St. fires. 

"It's getting so," said Mrs. 
Larkin, "that people come out on 
the street when they hear a fire 
truck or a police car go by. They 
are afraid when they hear a siren." 




MISS MERRYMOUNT of 1981 is Maureen Roche, 14, of Quincy Shore Drive (third left). With her from 
left are Kris Ann Hurley, 15, first runner-up; Chrissy Sullivan, Miss Merrymount of 1980; and Rebecca Sage, 
14, second runner up. The July 4th holiday event was sponsored by the Merrymount Association. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dave Gillooly) 

116 Wire Permits Issued In June 

received 47 
approval. 



The Department of Wire 
Inspection issued 116 permits for 
wiring estimated to cost $448,820 
during the month of June, Asst. 
Wire Inspector Thomas E. 
Purpura reported. 

A total of $2,454.75 in fees was 
collected, 141 inspections made, 17 
defects noted and 19 reinspections 



made. 
The Massachusetts Electric Co. 



certificates of 



Mail Service To Canada Suspended 



The U.S. Postal Service 
announces that mail service from 
the United States to Canada has 
been suspended due to a strike in 
their postal system. 

Effective immediately no class 
of mail for Canada will be 
accepted at any United States 
Post Office. Any mailer who has 
Canadian mail returned with the 
endorsement "Mail Service 
Temporarily Suspended" may 
obtain a refund for postage and 



fees at the office of mailing. 

This embargo on mail to 
Canada applies to all classes of 
mail, including Express Mail and 
Intelpost. 



NEWSCARRIERS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



^y^yy^^yy^^o^Tyy 



▼ "TV 



An old friend is coming 
back to Hingham. — 

See page 14 



Virginia's Nursery 
Day Core and 
Kindergarten 

on Wollaston Beach 

Open Year Round. Early 
Childhood Education. 
Call Virginia 

328-4332 



Helen Gurich's 

BEAUTY GARDENS 

1436 Hancock St., Quince 

Wishes To Announce 

NEW HOURS 

For Your Convenience 
Mon. thru Fh. 8a.m.- 10p.m. 472-9117 

Sat. till 5 p.m. M 472-9112 



"Mt 



LIQUIDATION SALE! 

IMPORT VILLAGE 

Is Liquidating Its Entire Inventory 

2 for 1 SALE 

BUY ONE GET ONE FREE! 

Buy one and receive any other item in the store (up to the value of 
your first choice) at no extra charge!! 

ENTIRE STOCK ON SALE! 



IMPORT VILLAGE 

1564 Hancock St., Quincy Center 

(across from Woolworth's) 

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30 472-9378 



WANT 
* 1,0 00? 



Buy a One-Thousand- 
Dollar certificate at Granite 
Co-op for only $737.86 ... 
thirty months later you can 
redeem your certificate for 
full face value. No other 
bank on the South Shore 
makes this offer. 



GiSnite^ 

co-grer^tiv^ 
c Bsjifk 




NORTH QUINCY 
440 Hancock St. 
773-8100 

QUINCY CENTER 
100 Granite St. 
471-3900 



Ask for a certificate at either office. Earn 
$262.14 on your $737.86 investment. 
?remature redemption requires a substantial 
penalty if permission to redeem is granted by 
the bank. All deposits insured in full. 






■* 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr 

I5«r Per Copy - $7.00 Per Year - Out of State $10.00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

POSTMASTER: Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St 

Quincy. Mass. 02169 

Member New England Press Association 



The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that 
part of an advertisement in which the typographical error 
occurs. 



'A96'' 



City Election 

w I he other candidate 



((.unl'il Jritm I'nfir I) 

when 1 1 hopefuls went to the 
post. 

That field included Quinn. 
Tobin. McCaulcy. plus George B. 
McDonald, now county com- 
missioner, Carl W. Anderson, a 
veteran councillor, and Frank 
Anselmo. currently a School 
Committeeman. 

The other political heavy- 
weights in the 1981 race are 
Patricia M. Toland, 49, of 82 
Cedar St., Wollaston, a School 
Committcew'oman; and Richard 
J. Koch Jr., 26, of 40 Putnam St., 
Quincy Center, who narrowly lost 
out in 1979. 

The others are Timothy P. 
Cahill, 22, 35 Packards Lane, 
Quincy Point; Louis E. Dolen, 29, 
119 Centre St., West Quincy; 
Robert J. Niven, 49, 293 Fayette 
St., Wollaston. 

Gregory P. Brooks, 24, 949 
Hancock St., Quincy Center; 
William J. O'Hare," 27, 59 
Hamden Circle, Wollaston; 
Dennis Buckley, 26, 24 Summit 
Ave.. Wollaston. 

The School Committee has 
attracted seven candidates for the 
three openings, with all three 
incumbents - Mary P. Collins, 
Joan C. Picard and John J. 
Sullivan -- seeking re-election, 
although Mrs. Picard has not yet 
taken out papers. 

Three other incumbents, 
Anselmo, Mrs. Toland and Vice 
Chairman Christopher F. 
Kennedy, are not up for 
re-election. 



I he other candidates include: 

James J. O'Brien, 19 River St.. 
Quincy Point; John J. Tompkins 
Jr., 41, 19 Holmes St.. Norfolk 
Downs; Nicholas C. Verenis, 34. 
82 Andrews Rd., Wollaston; 
Patrick J. Conroy Jr., 24, 272 
Billings St.. Atlantic. 

Verenis is a North Quincy High 
School teacher who lost his job 
under the Proposition 2'A cut- 
backs, and Conroy is making his 
third try for public office, having 
run before for the City Council 
and the School Committee. 

There will also be a preliminary 
contest for the Council in Ward 2, 
the Quincy Point ward, where 
Raymondi is giving up the seat to 
run for mayor. 

Joseph Cortese, 48, 48 Ellerton 
St., and Theodore P. 
DcCristofaro, 58, 17 Murdock 
Ave., are strong candidates with 
John H. McDuff Jr., 47, 216 
South St., the dark horse. 

Council President Leo J. Kelly, 
49, 143 Spring St., Houghs Neck, 
is facing opposition in Ward 1 
from David MacMillan, 43. 19 
Bell St., Houghs Neck, who also 
ran against him in 1979. 

Other councillors thus far have 
free rides to re-election: 

John J. Lydon Jr., 40. 468 
Beale St., Wollaston, in Ward 3, 
James A. Sheets, 46, 926 Furnace 
Brook Parkway, West Quincy, in 
Ward 4. Stephen J. McGrath, 27, 
36 Bass St., Wollaston, in Ward 
5, and Joanne Condon. 41, 175 
Quincy Shore Drive, Atlantic, in 
Ward 6. By TOM HENSHAW 




uincy 



Quiz 



Two winners in the Quincy Quiz this week. 
Barbara Gilfeather. 55 West Elm St., Wollaston wins a T-shirt 
and Donna Uvanitte, 10 Beebe Rd., Adams Shore, wins a bumper 
sticker. 

Each week two Quincy Sun T-shirts and two Quincy Sun 
bumper stickers are offered as prizes in the Quincy Quiz. 

The first two readers (one a mail subscriber) to submit to the 
Sun office in writing the correct answers to the week's five 
questions receive T-shirts. The next two receive bumper stickers. 
This week's Quincy Quiz: 

1. Three members of the Quincy School Committee are up for 
re-election this year. Name them. 

2. What familiar landmark is located at 444 Washington St., 
Quincy Point? 

3. True or false: Central Junior High School occupies the old 
Quincy High School building. 

4. What is the name of Quincy's superintendent of public 
buildings? 

5. John Adams of Quincy was president of the United States 
from: 1797 to 1801? 1797 to 1805? 1825 to 1829? 

Answers to last weeks Quincy Quiz: 

1. Perry Beach is in the Houghs Neck section of the city. 

2. True. The Mayor, the City Council and the School 
Committee are the only municipal officers elected by the voters of 
Quincy. 

3. Albert Kramer is the presiding justice of the Quincy District 
Court. 

4. The Islamic Center of New England is located at 470 South 
St. 

5. The Squantum Naval Air Station was closed in 1953. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Open On Sundays? No! 




Retail store owners would like to stay open on 
Sundays so they can do more business. 

Right? 

Wrong! 

A recent survey by the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce shows that 95 per 
cent of its retail membership 
opposes Sunday openings., 
according to Ron Frazier, 
General Manager and 
Manager Public Affairs. 

The results: 

Sixty-six per cent do not open on Sunday, do 
not want to open on Sunday and do not want a 
local option. 

Twenty-nine per cent do not open, do not 
want to open but do favor a local option. 

One per cent do not open, but want to and 
favor a local option. 

One per cent do not open, want to but do not 
favor a local option. 

Three per cent do open on Sundays, want to 
open but don't want a local option. 

The Chamber quotes such opposition 
reactions as: 

"1 like some time off also. Six days, five nights, 
that's enough. 

"Impossible to find qualified help to work on 
Sundays." 

"Increase overhead. Spread six days sales over 
seven. No additional business." 

"I'm a small businessman who likes to be 
home once in awhile." 

"No financial gain, only loss. 

"No one wants to work on Sundays." 

"Never on Sunday." 

Frazier says the Chamber will send its survey 
results to a special legislative study committee 
that will be making recommendations to the 
state legislature regarding Sunday retail 
openings. 

□ 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 
DEPT: WJDA'S Win 
Bettinson, editor of the 
Quincy Kiwanis Club 
newsletter, came up with this 
one recently: 

A clothing store in a 
midwestern city set aside 200 
BKTTINSON umbrellas for the use of 
pedestrians on rainy days. Any person could 
walk in and ask for one without leaving a 
deposit. He simply left his name and address. At 
the end of eight months a count showed: 197 




MORRISSEY 




umbrellas on hand. One storm casualty. Two 
stolen. And, many new accounts opened. 

□ 

WHAT CAN YOU do around Boston a 
l an klu I of gas? 

You can do Quincy. for one thing. 

The city of Presidents will be featured 
tomorrow (Friday) at 7:30 p.m. on Channel 4's 
"Evening Magazine." on a segment entitled "A 
Tankful Away." 

Hostess Joyce Kulhawik and the TV cameras 
\isited City Hall, the First Parish Church, the 
Adams Academy building, the Adams 
Mansions. Wollaston Beach, and Black's Creek. 

D 
TOG El HERN ESS 

Morrissey and his wife. 

Joanne, have completed a 

Western New England 

College (Springfield) course 

for their Master's Degrees in 

Public Administration. They 

have been attending the 

college's outreach program at 

Hanscom Field one night a week for 2 1 /: years. 

"It's one way to see your wife if you're in 

politics," Mike muses. Joanne is a nutritionist 

for the Department of Education. She and Mike 

met in 1973 while attending U-Massat Amherst. 

For the record, at Hanscom, Mike got 10 A'sand 

two B's and Joanne 9 A's and three B's. He's 

thinking of going to law school. 

□ 
THE MOTHER OF a former Little Leaguer, 
Mrs. Frank Ray, Butler Rd.. sends along this 
item she came across in the Lady of Mercy 
Church bulletin in Merrimack, N.H. Called 
"Little Leaguer's Prayer", she says both 
youngsters and parents might find it appropriate 
just about now: 

lord give me strength to hit the ball 
And if 1 do, don't let me fall. 
Help me to pick the one that's right 
Then let me knock it way outof sight. 
Then let me run with deer-like grace. 
Don't let me miss, but tag first base. 
Then on to second, stay with me Lord 
'Cause this one out, we can't afford. 
Then let me zoom like a flying bird 
Right down the line and on to third. 
Then let me slide with feet outburst 
Across home plate in the swishing dust. 
But first of all, Dear lord, I pray 
Just tell the Coach to let me play! 



Readers Forum 



Criticizes Harold On Endorsement 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

At a time when government is 
experiencing a renewal of the 
definitive differences between the 
Republican and Democratic 
parties, it is nothing less than 
ludicrous that our Democratic 
State Senator should ally his 
support and endorse a Republican 
Mayoral Candidate. 

Although the Mayoral election 
is non-partisan, this merely 
affords voters, regardless of their 



declared parties, to elect accord- 
ing to their conscience the best 
candidate without being bound by 
virtue of how they registered at 
City Hall. 

Conversely, the State Senator 
of our district, representing this 
City, was elected in a partisan 
election to represent Quincy as a 
Democrat. Had he discovered 
that his political ideology was 
vacillating between parties, it 
would have been onlv just and fair 



to his constituents to have run as 
an Independent. 

For state elected officials the 
choice of political party is no 
longer, as it has been for the past 
eight years, a mundane, inconse- 
quential factor, but rather a 
crucial and binding decision. A 
decision which should reflect 
commitment rather than personal 
whim. 

Michael G. Spaur 
70 Presidential Drive 



Commendations For Brownell. Morrissey 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
During the recent House debate 
on the state budget. Representa- 
tives Thomas Brownell and 
Michael Morrissey voted for an 
amendment to the budget bill that 
would have returned millions of 
dollars more in local aid to the 
cities and towns. 

They deserve to be commended 
for taking a position in favor of 
their constituents but contrary to 



that of the House leadership. Wc 
believe your readers should know 
about this refreshing act by your 
State Representatives. 



Thank you for your considera- 
tion. 

Richard A. Manley, President 
Mass. Taxpayers Foundation 



A Thank You From 
Junior Farm Baseball 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

Thank you for the excellent 
write-ups and publicity that you 
gave to the Junior Farm Baseball 
League for the 1981 season. The 



boys and girls really enjoy seeing 
their names in the paper. 

Don Murphy 

President 

Jr. Farm Baseball 



Thursday. July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 5 




FUND-RAISING for the new DOVE shelter is discussed by Dr. Bernadette MacPherson, site chairman; 
School Committeewoman Mary Collins; Dick Cahill, manager of the Jack Conway office in Quincy; and 
Rosemary Kirwan, president of DOVE. 

DOVE Needs $100,000 
For New Home 



DOVE has found a new home 
and now needs $100,000 to buy it. 

DOVE — an acronym for 
Domestic Violence Ended - uses 
the house as a shelter for battered 
women and children who are 
victims of domestic violence. 

The group is forced to vacate its 
current shelter Aug. 31. 



DOVE President Rosemary 
Kirwan said that $7,000 has 
already been raised toward the 
purchase of the new home, $6,000 
of it from Dick Cahill and Tom 
Rudolph, managers of Jack 
Conway offices in Quincy and 
Brockton respectively. 

Another $1,000 was raised by 
DOVE volunteers over the holiday 



weekend. The fund-raising drive 
will continue in supermarkets and 
package stores on the South 
Shore. 

Dr. Bernadette MacPherson of 
DOVE said the organization 
sheltered some two dozen women 
and children from family violence 
over the Fourth of July weekend. 



King, Nelson Expected 

Judges, Emcee Selected 
For Miss Quincy Bay Pageant 



Two of the state's best known 
political figures are expected to 
be on hand for the Miss Quincy 
Bay Beauty Pageant Friday July 
17 -- one working, the other just 
looking. 

Avi Nelson, the radio talk show 
host who has run for Congress 
and the U.S. Senate, will fill the 
newly created "celebrity" slot on 
the panel of judges. 

And Gov. Edward J. King has 
assured the Pageant Committee, 
chaired by Pat Jones, that he will 
make a guest appearance at the 
event. 

Tom Kennedy, one of Boston's 
leading radio personalities at 
WHDH, will return to act as 
master of ceremonies at the 
pageant, which will be held at 
9:30 p.m., July 17, on a portable 
boardwalk on Hancock St. in front 



of the Hancock Bank. 

Joining Nelson on the panel of 
judges will be: 

Nancy Meyers, Miss Quincy 
Bay of 1979; Ron Zooleck. 
executive director of the South 
Shore Chamber of Commerce; 
Bernie Reisberg, president of the 
Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association; and Bob 
Hutcheson, president of the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association. 

The pageant, which is co- 
sponsored by the QCBPA and the 



Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association, is the highlight of 
the annual Sidewalk Bazaar, July 
16, 17 and 18. 

The Neighborhood Club of 
Quincy will host the annual 
dinner party for all the 
contestants, Friday, July 10, at 6 
p.m. 

In the past three years, the 
pageants have drawn more than 
90 contestants from 15 South 
Shore towns and have attracted 
crowds estimated in excess of 
20,000. 



Brett Peruzzi On Dean's List 



Brett A. Peruzzi of 41 High St., 
Quincy. has been named to the 
dean's list at Bridgewater State 
College for the second consecutive 
year. 



Peruzzi, who is majoring in 
English, will be entering his Junior 
year in the fall. He is a 1979 
graduate of Quincy High School. 




Quincy 's 
Yesterdays 

By Tom Henshaw 




July 9-15, 

1924 

57 Years Ago 
This Week 



Navy Secretary 
Visits Shipyard, 
Squantum Field 

The new Secretary of the Navy, Curtis D. Wilbur paid an 
official visit to the Fore River Shipyard to inspect the battle 
cruiser Lexington, which was being converted into an aircraft 
carrier. 

Wilbur came to Quincy by automobile 
from Charlestown and was shown 
around the Bethlehem Steel Co.'s 
shipbuilding plant by the general 
manager, S.W. Wakeman. 

Then the party visited the flying field at 
Squantum and viewed the facility where 
destroyers were turned out almost 
overnight during the World War. 

Fred H. Borden of Wollaston, the yacht builder, told Wilbur he 
was prepared to purchase or lease the Squantum shipbuilding 
plant in the interests of the Dollar Steamship Line. 

Wilbur said the state had first option on the facility if it were to 
be given up by the federal government. 

CLOWNS BEATEN 

Steve White pitched a four-hitter as the Wollaston club of the 
City League defeated the touring Detroit Clowns, 4-3, before 
3,500, the largest crowd of the season at Merrymount Park. 

The Wollaston lineup included Sessler cf, Coose lb, Jones 2b, 
E. Arthur If, Plause 3b, C. Arthur rf, Cain ss, Barry c, White p. 
REBUILD HANCOCK ST. 

The City Council took steps to make available immediately the 
sum of $40,000 to rebuild a section of Hancock St. near Squantum 
St. with granite blocks on a concrete base. 

The Council also appropriated $35,000 to widen Franklin st. 
between Water St. and Independence Ave., South Quincy. 
LEDGER'S NEW HOME 

The Patriot Ledger moved from its old office at 1424 Hancock 
St. into a new home on Temple St., with brand new presses that 
were able to turn out newspapers at a rate of 250 a minute. 
REWARD FOR POLICE 

James Fratus of Atlantic asked permission of Police Chief 
Alfred W. Goodhue to reward Sgt. George W. Fallon and 
Patrolman Daniel Collins for catching the thief who stole his 
strong box with $500 in gold. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Mayor Gustave B. Bates said he plans to ask the City Council 
for $28,000 to put Faxon Field into condition to be used by 
athletes at the new high school. . . Mr. and Mrs. Edwin T 
Townsend of Intervale St., North Quincy, returned home in their 
new Flint car after a visit to York Beach and Belfast, Maine. . . The 
town of Milton invited Quincy to cooperate in a plan to celebrate 
the 100th anniversary of the nation's first commercial railway in 
October. . . A two-family, 10-room house in Quincy Point was 

selling for $4,800 from John L. Blinn, 1359 Hancock St City 

Librarian Truman R. Temple returned from the 46th annual 
conference of the American Library Association at Saratoga 
Springs, N.Y. . . . J.H. Hayes, manager of the Quincy division of 
the Eastern Mass Street Railway, said jitney buses could be put in 
operation in Quincy as soon as the City Council gives its approval 
. . . Clan MacGregor voted to send a message of sympathy to 
President and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge on the death of their son. 
Calvin Jr. . . . Superstroke tennis racquets were $13.50 at 
Westland's Sporting Goods, 1555 Hancock St. . . . Police Chief 
Goodhue was vacationing with his family for two weeks at 
Nantasket Beach, leaving Capt. Ernest H. Bishop in charge as 
acting chief ... The price of gasoline at Quincy stations was cut 
from 22 cents to 21 cents a gallon . . . Charles H. Johnson, school 
attendance officer and superintendent of the First Parish Sunday 
School, was taking courses in public speaking at Harvard . . . The 
Central Building and Wrecking Co. was offering free fire wood 
from the building being torn down at 1445-51 Hancock St. . . The 
Quincy Elks won the $400 first prize for the most attractive float in 
the parade at the National Elks Convention in Boston. . . Mr. and 
Mrs. William Harvey of Dorchester opened their cottage on 
Orchard St., Squantum, for the summer . . . Palm Beach suits were 
$12.50 at Remick's. 1517 Hancock St. . . . Herbert W. Robbins 
shot a hole-in-one on the 135-yard third hole at Stoney Brae Golf 
Course . . . Employees of Henry L. Kincaide and Co. held their 
annual outing at Mayflower Grove in Bryantville and spent the 
evening at Col. Kincaide's summer home in Cohasset . . . Edna 
Foote of Norfolk Downs, daughter of Gen. Alfred N. Foote, the 
state commissioner of public safety, sponsored the new state 
police boat that was launched at an Essex boat yard . . . Alfred N. 
LaBrecque was the first to file for the Republican nomination for 
state representative ... A plane crashed at Camp Devens, 
narrowly missing Lt. Joseph K Barber Jr. of 34 Acton St., 
Wollaston, and Capt. Clarence E. Hodge of 143 Beach St., 
Wollaston, who were on duty with the National Guard. 



Pate 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 



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M/?. and A//?S. JOHN P. CARROLL 



[Mclntire's Studio] 



Linda Marie DiSalvio Bride 
Of John P. Carroll 



Linda Marie DiSalvio and John 
P. Carroll were recently married 
at St. John's Church, Quincy, 
during a double ring ceremony 
performed by Rev. Daniel M. 
Graham. 

The bride, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur A. DiSalvio of 80 
Edwards St., Quincy, is a 
graduate of Quincy High School 
and of Bridgewater State College. 
She is employed as an Informa- 
tion Systems Programmer at the 
Massachusetts State College 
Computer Network. 



INSTANT COLOR 

PASSPORT 
PHOTOS 

Mc3ntlre 7 A 

Studio 

679 Hancock St., Wollaston 

Closed Monday Tel: 479-6888 



The bridegroom is the son of 
Mrs. Mary Carroll of 65 Edwards 
St., Jamaica Plain. He is a 
graduate of Catholic Memorial 
High School and Control Data 
Institute. He served four years 
with the U.S. Coast Guard and is 
now a Customer Engineer at 
Control Data Corporation. 

Maid of honor was Joanne 
DiSalvio of Quincy, sister of the 
bride. Bridesmaids were Mrs. 
Virginia Snell of Braintree and 
Maureen Mahoney of Quincy. 

Best man was James Ryan of 
Hanover. Ushers were Bruce 
McLeod of Jamaica Plain and 
William Burke of Dedham. 

Mrs. Judith Curran of Deny, 
New Hampshire was the guest 
book attendant. 

A reception was held at the 
Quincy Sons of Italy Social 
Center, Quincy. 

After a wedding trip to Walt 
Disney World, Orlando, Florida, 
the newlyweds are making their 
home in Jamaica Plain. 




females 

monday specials 
wash-cut-blow dry 



$ 10 



00 



1 



Eyebrow & Facial waxing 
Permanent Individual Eyelashes 
»«9 *is Special $1250 

FACIALS $15.00 Ear Piercing $7.50 Manicure $ 5.00 I 

"An hour of Luxury " ' ncl - rtu * 




males \ 

tues. & thurs. specials' 

blow cut 

8 



includes 
shampoo 

$050 



RutWlt Edward* i 




L 



cor. Hancock & Chestnut & Maple Sts. 

13 Maple St., Quincy 472-1060 
OPEN Monday, Thursday Evenings 



I 
I 

I 
I 

I 

1 



Births 



Jane 26 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Marks 
(Anne Reilly), 22 South Central 
Ave., Wollaston, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Mullen 
(Nancy Buckley). 10 Dobson Rd., 
Braintree, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Norton 
(Maryann Ricci), 30 Vershire St., 
North Quincy, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Vincent 
(Anne Creeden), 35 Piermont St., 
Wollaston, a son. 

June 27 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Peterson 
(Patricia Preston), 106 Broad St.. 
Weymouth, a daughter. 

June 28 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wilson 
(Janice Cannon), 274 Reedsdale 
Rd., Milton, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lavery 
(Kathryn Lombard), 88 Edwin 
St., North Quincy, twin 
daughters. 

Mr. and Mrs. William 
McDonough (Deborah Maloof). 
244 Quincy Ave., Quincy, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Waibel 
(Geraldine Smith), 46 Brockton 
Ave., Quincy, a daughter. 

June 29 

Mr. and Mrs. John Gannon 
(Marcia Vinal). 11 Gale Lane, 
Mansfield, a son. 

June 30 

Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Ake (Ruth 
Omo), 10 Speakman St., 
Wollaston, a son. 

Julyl 

Mr. and Mrs. Emmanuel 
Ofuokwu (Margaret Killilea), 309 
Hancock St., Braintree, a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Russo 
(Betsy Adams), 33 Russell St., 
Hull, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Page 
(Janet Priscella), 150 Mediterran- 
ean Dr., Weymouth, a daughter. 

July 2 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex Olson 
(Deborah Durkee), 121 Crestfield 
Drive, Brockton, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James 
Wolongevicz (Patricia Evans), 
102 Read Drive, Hanover, a 
daughter. 



ELECTROLYSIS 



UNWANTED HAIR 

PERMANENTLY 

REMOVED 

Face, Eyebrows, 
Body, Legs, Hairline 

Dolores MacMilion # R.E. 

680 Hancock St., Wollaston 

Office hours by appointment 
Complimentary consultation available 

471-9500 or 4710214 




MARRIED 2S YEARS - Mr. and Mrs. lincent R. McDonald,,/ 
Quincy recently celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary at a 
surprise party at the Sinilh Shore Country Club, Hingham. 



lSharon\ Studio) 



Mr., Mrs. Vincent R. McDonald 
Celebrate 25th Anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. Vincent R. 
McDonald of Quincy were guests 
of honor recently at a surprise 
25th anniversary dinner party 
held at the South Shore Country 
Club, Hingham. 

The party was given by the 
couple's son, Scott, daughter, 
Karen, and son-in-law Anthony 
Capano. 



More than 125 guests were on 
hand for the celebration for the 
McDonald's who were married 
Feb. 11, 1956 at Christ Episcopal 
Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. McDonald is the former 
Carmella Lomanno. 

Mr. McDonald is employed at 
South Shore Country Club. He is 
also a member of the Quincy 
Lodge of Elks. 



Granite Place Plans 
Pot Luck Picnic July 16 



The Granite Place residents are 
planning a pot luck picnic for 
Thursday, July 16 at 6:30 p.m. 

The ladies of the complex will 
provide casseroles, salads, etc. 
Liquid refreshments will also be 
served. Entertainment will be by 
the fabulous musical group the 
"Over The Hill Gang". The 



picnic will be held in the rear 
patio area behind the complex. 

On Monday afternoon, July 20, 
the Granite Place senior citizens 
will take a tour of Boston Harbor. 
The trip is sponsored by the 
Boston Gas Company. The bus 
will be leaving Granite Place at 
12:20 p.m. 



LOVE IS 




. a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 

Speak to Terry Stracco - She's our rental agent - 
specializing in complete wedding package plans 
and all other occasions. The Golden Lion Suite 
accommodates up lo 300. The Venetian Room up 
to 1 50 guests. Give Terr* a call for an appointment 
for your reservation. New brochures are available, 
(air conditioned) 

(ALL Quincy Sons of Italy Social Center 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy, MA 02169 

NEW Nl MBER is 472-5900 



MEDICAL ASSOCIATES OF QUINCY, INC. 



GERALD ROSENBLATT, M.D., INC. 

Internal Medicine and 
diseases of the heart 

KENNETH J. EINSTEIN, M.D., INC. 

Internal Medicine and 
diseases of the lung 



ROBERT S. SIPZENER, M.D., INC. 

Internal Medicine and 
diseases of the gastrointestinal 
tract and liver 

CHARLES J. SCHWARTZ, M.D., INC 

Internal Medicine and 
diseases of the gastrointestinal 
tract and liver 



takes pleasure in announcing that 

DENNIS S. GOLDIN, M.D. 

will hereafter be associated with them in the 
practice of Internal Medicine and Arthritic Diseases. 



Office Hours 

By Appointment 

773-2600 



21 School Street 
Quincy, Ma. 02169 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 7 





ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Frederick S. Price of Quincy 
announce the engagement of their daughter, Cynthia 
Lee, to Frank S. Maher, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stan Maher 
of Quincy. Miss Price, a graduate of Quincy Vocational 
Technical School, is employed as a home health aide by 
Quincy Visiting Nurses. Mr. Maher, a graduate of Quincy 
High School, owns and is employed by Bay Shore 
Construction. An Aug. 29, wedding is planned. 

NQHS Class Of '41 
Planning Oct. 3 Reunion 



ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Bolster of 140 
Brook St., Wollaston, announce the engagement of their 
daughter, Kerry Michelle, to Joseph W. Cox, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William A. Cox of 89 Cummings Ave., 
Wollaston. Miss Bolster is a graduate of North Quincy 
High School. Mr. Cox was graduated from Quincy 
Vocational Technical School. An Oct. 3, wedding is 
planned. 

[Pagar Studios] 




ENGAGED -- Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Donelin of Quincy 
announce the engagement of their daughter, Janet Marie, 
to Peter J. Hanlon, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. 
Hanlon of East Sandwich. Miss Donelin, a graduate of 
Emmanuel College, is employed at Sears, Braintree. Mr. 
Hanlon, a graduate of Bryant College, is employed as a 
natural resource officer. A September wedding is 
planned. 



The reunion committee of the 
North Quincy High School class of 
1941 has set Saturday, Oct. 3, as 
the date for the 40th year reunion. 

The committee, headed by Dr. 
James Will, Quincy dentist, 
recently met at the home of Mrs. 
Dorothe James Tressler. 

Members of the committee are: 
Isabelle Peavy Bellows, Muriel 
Lyman Burnhauser, Warren and 
Pat Owen Clark, Virginia 
Holdstock, Donald Layton, Bill 
and Peg Ahern, Lois Smith 
Munson, Fred Smith, Ed 
Swindler, Dorothe James 
Tressler, and Betty Howard 
Wooldridge. 

Many classmates have been 
contacted. However, anyone with 
information on a number of 
missing classmates is asked to 
contact Mrs. Peg Ahern Molloy, 
1342 Liberty St., Braintree, 
843-8911. 
Missing class members are: 
Helen Ajemian, Audrey E. 
Andrews, John B. Baker, George 
H. Bean, Mary G. Behan 
Allbright, Miriam L. Bradish, 
Francis J. Brennan, Lily B. 
Buchan, Edna J. Channell, 
Phyllis Cluff Cobeam, William Y. 
Cole, James C. Crutcher, William 
J. Cummings, Miriam Daitch, 
Gloria M. Dickson Jepson, 

Mr., Mrs. Pugliese 
Parents Of Daughter 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Pugliese 
of North Weymouth are parents 
of a daughter. Amy Louise, their 
first child, born April 18, at St. 
Margaret's Hospital for Women. 
Boston. 

Mrs. Pugliese is the former 
Patricia Swanson. 

Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Carl Swanson of West Quincy; 
and Mr. and Mrs. Salvatore 
Pugliese of Quincy Point. 

Mr. Theodore Pugliese of 
Quincy Point is great 
grandfather. 



Mrs. Pearl Garcia Re-appointed 
To Emblem Club National Board 



Norfolk County 
Bar Association 

Lawyer reference service will 
help in selecting an attorney. 

If you need a lawyer and don't 
know one, call us and you will be 
referred to an attorney in your 
area who will talk to you for a 
nominal fee for the first visit. 

P. 0. Box 66. Dedham, Mass. 
326-8699 

Call 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



Priscilla Doe, Josephine A. 
Doherty Robinson, Evelyn R. 
Donahue Guerra, Barbara L. 
Drake Walley. 

Jean M. Drohan, Wheeler R. 
Dunbar, James I. Fisher, Albert 
V. Fogo, John J. Geary, Robert 

D. Hewins, Roger C. Hewins, 
Thomas P. Hueneke, Clayton M. 
Hyland, Agnes M. Jones, Robert 
J. Jones, Bernard A. King Jr., 
Gertrude T. Kirkland Huckins, 
Alfred T. Landry, Betty A. 
Lindberg, George J. MacGregor, 
Richard Martineau, Thomas A. 
McCarthy, Anne Mclver, Frank 

E. McKusich. 

Pauline M. Melanson, George 
T. Merrill, Olive B. Merrill, 
Eudora J. Moore North, Eileen 
M. Morris, Edward Mavin, 
Sandra S. Price, Frederick C. 
Rapson, Mary F. Reardon Crane, 
Ida F. Rettig Alteri, Noreen M. 
Rippel, Shirley Rogerson, 
Virginia A. Rohrer Sharp, 
Margaret V. Rowe, Isabelle M. 
Rule, John L. Scripp, Joyce Smith 
Mott, Roger L. Smith, Robert E. 
Sullivan, George J. Thomas, 
Robert D. Thompson, Jack L. 
Udall, Shirley B. Verry, Mildred 

F. Walsh, Paul A. Webber, 
Marguerite A. Welch, Harold E. 
Whitten. 



Mrs. Pearl Garcia, Past 
National President of Emblem 
Clubs of America, recently 
returned from attending the 
National Board meeting at 



Social 



Squantum Seniors 
To Meet 

The Squantum Seniors will hold 
their monthly meeting Tuesday, 
July 21, at 7:30 p.m. in Maryhall, 
Star of the Sea Church. Entertain- 
ment will be provided by Pauline 
Waldron, soloist and pianist. 



Denver, Colo. 

Among the business transacted 
was the awarding of $36,000 in 
scholarships to students. Mrs. 
Garcia has served on the Scholar- 
ship Committee for six years and 
has been reappointed for another 
year. 

She and Sue McGregor, 
founder and vice president of the 
Massachusetts State Association 
of Emblem Clubs, acting 
respe ctively as Supreme Install- 



Guys & Gals 

Get the Latest 
Blow Cut 



ing Officer and Supreme Install- 
ing Marshal, have completed one 
year of installing the officers of 
clubs in N.H., Maine, Vermont 
and Massachusetts. 

Accompanying them were the 
following Past Presidents of 
Quincy Emblem Club, Josephine 
Carnali, Mary Spalding and 
Charlotte Wilson. 

The National Convention of 
Emblem Clubs will be held in 
Atlanta, Ga., in September. 



• Shampoo • Precision Cut* Blow 



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389 Hancock St. 
Quincy 

328-3959 

Since 1900 




_ At a price you can afford 

PCriUS Incudes cut, shampoo, 
creme rinse, styling 
Mo appointment necessary - just come on ml 



$12 



Marvel 



Mastercharge - Visa Accepted 



Parking In Rear Of Shop 5 Cottage Ave., QuiflCy 

Hours: 8:30-6:00 Daily A70 QCQ1 

Thurs.&Fri.tilS 472-9681 



Ralph H. Golding, a.c.s.w.,l.i.c.s.w. 

Massac husetts Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker 

Psychotherapist 
44 Grcenleaf Street 472-8661 

Quincy Center 331-5058 

Management of 

Family Conflicts • Separation • Drinking 

Drug Use • Depression • Emotional Tensions 

Stress • Anxiety • Crises 

Individual, Couple. Family, Marital & Group Therapy 
On site Parking Evening & Weekend Hours Available 




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Plus Take Down and ReHang in your home or office 

Plus No Shrink written statement 

Plus the finest gentle cleaning and perfection pleating 

CALL 698-8300 



Walk in drapery cleaning 
accepted at all locations 



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Seni >r Citizens Discount 



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§ mm mm to 



28 Greenwood Ave., 



Wollaston 

across from the MBTA 




Closed Mondays 

Open Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 A.M. — 5:30 P.M. 

Open Thurs. eves 'til 8:30 



773-5266 



VtSA 






Pa*e 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 



Margaret King Re-elected 
To MTA Executive Committee 



318 On Central Honor Roll 



Margaret O. King, a teacher at 
Quincy High School, was re- 
elected to a two-year term on the 
Executive Committee of the 
Massachusetts Teachers Associa- 
tion (MTA) at the recent annual 
meeting in Boston. 

She will continue to serve on 
the 12-member Executive 
Committee, the principal policy- 
making body of the MTA. 

She is head of the mathematics 
department at Quincy High 
School, a member of the executive 
board of the Quincy Education 
Association and president-elect of 
the Norfolk County Teachers 
Association. 

The MTA annual meeting 
heard sharp criticism leveled at 
Proposition 2Vi, which could 
result in the layoff of as many as 
12,000 teachers statewide. 

Carol A. Doherty, MTA Presi- 
dent, called upon the state 
legislature to "act quickly to 
amend Proposition 2'/j before it 
completely destroys public 
education in Massachusetts." 

MTA Executive Director Dr. 




MARGARET KING 

William H. Hebert, told the 
delegates that the state needs "a 
carefully thought-out tax reform 
and state aid package to erase the 
problems caused by Proposition 
2Vj." 

"We just shift the tax burden 
in this state from those who have 
paid too much for too long to 
those who can afford to pay their 
fair share," he said. 



S Residents Bunker Hill Gratis 



Five graduates from Quincy 
were awarded associate degrees 
recently at graduation exercises 
of Bunker Hill Community 
College in Charlestown. 

They are Patricia A. Brennan, 9 



Yardarm Lane; Paul Cuddy, 48 
Sagamore Ave.; Allison M. Fay, 
35 Dysart St.; Rita L. Foley, 41 
Algonquin Rd.; Joseph K. 
Leuchte, 34 Ellington Rd. 



Central Junior High School 
lists 318 students on the 
third-quarter honor roll. They 
are: 

High Honors 
Grade 7 
Cheryl J. Abbood, Mark H. 
Armour, John P. Barnes, Denisc A. 
Bartkus, Cheryl M. Bina, Catherine 
R. Buckley, John Carroll, Stacey V. 
Carvalho, Laura A. Colclough, 
Samuel T. Connolly, Christopher J. 
Coughlin, Laura A. DesRoche, 
Maureen E. Doherty, Nancy A. Ellis, 
Maria V. Escano, Kathleen Fiumara, 
Shaun M. Flavin, Juli A. Ford, Laura 
A. Forde, Jennifer Gannon, Jennifer 
L. Golden, Michael E. Gray, Renee 
M. Gurry, Anne Hegarty, Carolyn A. 
Keddy, Maureen A. Kennedy, 
Thomas Lee, Mario Levangie, Carol 
A. Liuzza, Kristine Locke, Antecla 
Lombardi, Linda C. Luiso, Judith A. 
Lutts, Amy K. Maginnis, Elizabeth 
M. Maher, Lisa M. Mauriello, Julie A. 
McCole, Catherine R. Miele, John D. 
Nee, Stacie G. Nigro, Kim C. 
Noltemy, Richard J. Norman, 
Heather G. Norton, Heath A. 
Petracca, Renee F. Picard, Steven H. 
Protasowicki, Jill M. Quinn, 
Christopher P. Ricciuti, Janice I. 
Ruane, Jennifer L. Rush, Kirsten M. 
Saunders, Susan A. Scott, Kerri L. 
Smith, Eileen M. Warren, Carol A. 
Williams, Richard D. Wilson, Joseph 
M. Zaccheo. 

Honors 
Grade 7 
Nancy Amendolare, Richard L. 



Armstrong, Kelly A. Bagley, Patricia 
A. Biagini, Stephen E. Billard, Tracy 
L. Blake, Kenneth M. Boyce, Debra 
L. Burke, Blanche E. Canty, John A. 
Cassctta, Michelle Cleary, Melissa A. 
Cobb, Paul J. Cohane, Anne M. 
Cronin, John W. Crowley, Michael F. 
Daly, Douglas P. DePaolo, Adam W. 
Devine, Christine DiGravio, Dennis P. 
Doherty, Lorraine A. Dorley, Amy 
Drain, Robert Dudley, Maureen E. 
Calvin, Richard D. Golden, Eric J. 
Gould, Michelle Graham, Julie A. 
Guidice, Fatima Hamdi, Carolyn M. 
Hannon, Michelle D. Holland, Laura 
Kalantzis, Scott A. Kearns, Susan F. 
Kelly, Andrea R. LaPierre, Michelle 
H. Leister, Anthony Losordo, 
William J. Luosey, Elizabeth A. 
MacDonald, Lisa M. Maki, Leighann 
Maloney, Julie A. Manning, Maurice 
E. McCarthy, Scott E. McClelland, 
Michael G. Meleedy, Kimberly 
Mellon, John J. Mitchell, Douglas A. 
Morash, Kellie Naser, Cristian S. 
Neamtu, Elizabeth Nelson, John W. 
Nelson, Lisa M. Nurmenniemi, Gerald 
M. O'Connell, Steven P. O'Connell, 
Tracy O'Connell, Kristin O'Keefe, 
Paul D. O'Leary, Daniel J. O'Sullivan 
Jr., Patrick H. O'Sullivan, Donna I. 
Parry, Jonathan R. Paul, Roy 
Peterson, Debra Roche, Michael J. 
Rugnetta, Kenneth J. Southwick, 
Anthony A. Souza, Katherine L. 
Stark, Deborah M. Sullivan, 
Lawrence R. Taglieri, Tammy 
Theodore, Kevin G. Tobin, Anne M. 
Ventresca, Jean M. Welby, J. 
Frederick Wendt, Todd R. Williams, 
Mary L. Wirtz, K. George Yanefsky 



* 
* 
$ 
* 
* 
* 
* 



Annual Houghs Neck Community Council 

ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft 

OH** *11thof JULY 



JULY 



7,8,9,10,11 



* 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 



FIELD DAY 

ALL DAY 

La BRECQUE FIELD 

Doll Carriage and 
Bicycle Parade 

Dunking Booth 

Family Games 

Miss Teenage 
Houghs Neck 
Contest 

MANY OTHER ACTIVITIES 



# ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ftftftft 



*r 





Xr 

Xr 
Xr 

Xr 

Xr 

Xr 
Xr 
Xr 
Xr 
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Xr 
Xr 
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Xr 

Xr 

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High Honors 
Grade 8 
Susan E. Brillantes, Karen M. 
Bryan, Diane M. Callow, Patricia L. 
Campbell, Susan M. Cohane, Tracy 
A. Coleman, Julie M. Costa, Christine 
L. Crosson, Tracy A. Daly, Mary C. 
Davin, William S. Denneen, Leanne 
M. Dondero, Ann M. Doyle, Colleen 
M. Dunn, Sandra J. Dunn, Kathleen 
M. Egan, Kelley Fallon, Philip P. 
Fantasia, Patricia J. Flaherty, Maria 

C. Gonzales, Kathryn E. Gorczyca, 
Margaret V. Hegarty, Sheila Holland, 
Kathleen M. Jenkins, Jennifer M. 
Johnston, Grace M. B. Kelly, 
Ferdinand J. Kiley IV, Kristin R. 
Killilea, Andrew S. Lenhardt, 
Stephanie Levangie, Sandra G. 
Levine, Karen M. Logan, Nancy 
Losordo, Karen E. Marnell, David J. 
McArthur, Theresa M. McLoughlin, 
Michelle J. Morway, Geraldine M. 
Murphy, Leanne P. O'Rourke, 
Valerie J. Papapetros, Christ J. 
Pappas, Evelyn Perepelyuk, Michele 
M. Proude, Daniel QuUl, Kimberly A. 
Scigliano, Kathleen Shaw, Kevin M. 
Shurtluff, Elizabeth SUkwood, 
Suzanne M. Stec, Catharine M. Todd, 
Kim H. Truong, Michelle F. 
Tulimieri. 

Honors 
Grade 8 
Chris Aimola, Eric A. Anderson, 
Cynthia Bailey, Sean P. Garry, Peter 

D. Beauchamp, Barbara Bell, Brian R. 
Bollinger, George G. Burke, Beth A. 
Cahill, Robin E. Caldwell, Tracy A. 
Carroll, Gregory M. Collins, Ann M. 
Conroy, John M. Cristiani, Michelle 
A. Daigle, Richard Davis, Cathy M. 
De Franc, John Donovan, Elizabeth 
Dudley, Matthew D. Elofson, David 
R. Fahey, Michael R. Farrand, 
Richard M. Fitzpatrick, Sian E. 
Graham, Carol A. Jones, Brenda A. 
Jordan, Laurence E. Leonard, Lisa M. 
Livingstone, Susan L. Lowe, Lisa M. 
Lynch, Michael Maclnnis, Patrick 
Marcham, Wendy M. MarshaU, Brian 
J. McClelland, Joyce A. O'DonneU, 
Deborah Operach, Deborah L Parry, 
Lorena S. Quiton, Brian W. Shaw, 
Karen F. Sweet, Melissa Tarn, Elise B. 
Tobman, Peter C. Walsh, Renee L. 
Willard. 

High Honors 
Grade 9 
Todd J. Batson, Maryellcn 
Conlon, Mark E. Denneen, Kristen 
Dever, Lucia R. DeVito, Vicker V. 
DiGravio, Karen A. Dougan, Michelle 
Dunn, Lori A. Facella, Maura A. 
Feeney, Jake Flaherty, Christine 
Francis, Kevin J. Golden, Paul F. 
Gorczyca, James Gouzias, Dawn L. 
Graham, Pamela J. Grubb, Mirella 
Gullifa, Amy E. Harrison, Kathy A. 
Hegarty, Kristin Howard, John P. 
Joseph, Alice M. Kavanagh, Elizabeth 
A. Kelley, Karen L. Koski, Lisa 
LeBlanc, Robyn Linehan, Robin 
Lytle, Julian Macri, Lynne C. 
Maloney, Jennifer M. McCauley, 
David M. Meleedy, Carolyn M. 
Mercier, Bernadette C. Murphy, Julie 
Nee, Natalie E. Nigro, Suzanne A. 
Nolan, Catherine L. O'Brien, Lauren 
O'Rourke, Jaime C. Paz, Suzanne 
Picard, Terrence J. Stark, Elaine A. 
Sugarman, Elizabeth V. Toland, 
Stephen Warren. 

Honors 
Grade 9 
Joseph H. Berlinguet, John G. 
Bolster, Brian D. Bresnahan, Faith D. 
Brooks, David M. Brown, Corinne K. 
Caflisch, Kevin J. Cameron, Ann T. 
Carroll, Caroline R. CoUins, Eileen T. 
Crehan, Robert Davis, Tara H. Dillon, 
Emilie M. Donlan, Brenda Donovan, 
Maureen E. Doran, Donna M. Feulo, 
Nora Furey, Kerry Gannon, James 
Garrity, Debra L. Harding, Annette 
K. Higgins, Therese A. Horion, James 
W. Keenan, Kathleen M. Kelly, 
Carolyn A. Leonard, Patrick C. 
MacDonald, David H. Magnell, 
Dianne T. Mango, Tara E. McCarthy, 
Jack P. Milgram, Eileen M. Morris, 
Mary A. Nolan, Carl M. O'Brien, 
Scott W. Orrock, Paul A. Porcaro, 
Adele D. Quintiliani, Julie Robinson, 
Daniel P. Roden, Judith M. White, 
Linda M. White, Kennedy K. 
Yanefski. 




*ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftfrftftftftftfrftftftftfrftftftftft^%. 



For Home 

Delivery 

Call 471-3100 

\11l Hancock Slr«l Ouin. . Mass. |SI?H . I 






Bryan Post Awards 
$3,500 In Scholarships 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Winners of $3,500 in annual 
scholarships have been 

announced by Arthur G. McLean, 
the scholarship chairman of the 
Bryan VFW Post. The awards, 
each worth $500, went to: 

Carolyn Nee, 87 Bartlett St., 
Quincy High School, the George 
Warren Underwood Memorial 
Scholarship. She will attend 
Boston College. 

Christine Drake, 654 Willard 
St., Quincy High School, the 
George F. Bryan Memorial 
Nursing Scholarship for Quincy 
High School. She will attend the 
New England Baptist Hospital 
School of Nursing. 

Scott Brennan, 188 South 
Central Ave., North Quincy High 
School, the Richard J. 
Vasconcellos, USMC, Memorial 
Scholarship. He will attend 
UMass-Boston. 

Johanna E. Ostby, 119 Brom- 
field St., North Quincy High 
School, the George F. Bryan 
Memorial Nursing Scholarship for 
North Quincy High School. She 
will attend Fitchburg State 
College. 

Deborah M. Buckley, 28 Hall 
Place, Quincy Vocational Tech- 
nical School, the George F. Bryan 
Post Voke Tech Scholarship. She 
will attend Franklin Institute. 

Shui K. Seto, 129 East 
Squantum St., North Quincy High 
School, the George F. Bryan Post 

6 Residents 
On Dean's List 
At Bunker Hill 

Six students from Quincy have 
been named to the dean's list at 
Bunker Hill Community College 
in Charlestown for the spring 
semester. They are: 

Jane E. Westgate, 41 Vane St.; 
Patricia A. Brennan, 9 Yardarm 
Lane; Michael F. Lawlor, 38 
Arnold St.; Carolyn McAleney, 43 
Ellington Rd.; Kenneth C. Watt, 
82 Sherman St.; Eugene F. 
Zupkoeska Jr., 19 Old Colony 
Ave. 



Save Gas and Money . 
. . . Shop Locally 




Dental 
Corner 

by 
Lee A. WelkyD.M.D. 

MAGNETIC DENTURES? 

Q:My grandfather told me he 
has magnetic dentures. Are 
there really such things? 

A: Yes. If the jawbone is so 
worn that dentures will not 
stay put, magnets can be 
placed in both dentures. As 
the jaws close, the magnets 
repel each other exerting 
force to keep the teeth in 
place. 

Q:l've been wearing dentures 
23 years and have hardly 
any bone left in my lower 
jaw. My lower denture is 
very loose. With so little 
bone, could I expect a 
better fit from a new one? 

A: You'll never get suction, 
but a new full denture will 
surely fit better than an old 
one, even with a fairly flat 
ridge. Often the denture can 
be extended longer under 
the tongue to make up for 
the lack of bone. 

Presented as a service to the 
community by 

Lee A. WelkyD.M.D. 
234 Sea Street 
Quincy 
479-3030 



Voice of Democracy Scholarship. 
He will attend Tufts University. 

The post also granted to Quincy 
Junior College the annual James 
D. Asher Memorial Scholarships 
in the total amount of $500, with 
the winners to be selected by QJC 
President Dr. Edward F. Pierce. 



Lucille DiGravio 

Lucille Marchant DiGravio, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Marchant of Janet Rd., 
Wollaston, received a master's 
degree in special education at the 
76th commencement exercises of 
Simmons College. 

Mrs. DiGravio, who was 
graduated from Boston State 
College in 1965 and holds a 
master's degree in education 
from the same school, plans to 



Receives Masters From Simmons 



work as a 766 evaluation team 
leader in Boston schools. 
She and her husband, Vicker V. 



DiGravio Jr., live in Quincy with 
their two children, Vicker V. Ill 
and Christine. 



Kendra Donovan 



Gordon College Graduate 

College, Wenham, with a B.S. 
degree in Physical education. 

She was one of nearly 200 
students to receive degrees at 
Gordon's 89th commencement. 



Kendra J. Donovan, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth 
Donovan of Wollaston, was 
graduated recently from Gordon 



BACK IN HIGH SCHOOL 
DAN RAYN0NDI RAN 
FOR MORE THAN 
TOUCHDOWNS. 



w *<* 




'uringthe early 1960's Dan Raymondi 
was a football star at Quincy High School. In 
fact, he was good enough to be named a High 
School All- American. But Dan didn't just run 
for touchdowns in high school. He also ran for 
Class President. And he was elected to the 
post in both his junior and senior years. 

After high school Dan went on to Holy Cross 
where he excelled in academics(Dean's List 
student) and athletics (captain of the football 
team). Later, while a full-time student at Boston 
College Law School, Dan ran for and won a seat 
on the Quincy School Committee. 

Four years and many accomplishments 



Raymond 



Dennis F. Ryan, Esquire, 84 Fenno Street, Wollaston, MA 



later, Dan's sense of civic duty 
prompted him to run for the City 
Council. That was six years ago. And 
in his 10 years of public life, Dan has 
never lost an election. During that time 
he has done a lot for his constituents, 
especially while serving as the newly appointed 
Chairman of the Downtown and Economic 
Development Committee. He's also served 
as an Assistant District Attorney and Public 
Defender at Quincy District Court. 

Now, Dan Raymondi would like to be able 
to do even more for the residents of Quincy. 
So he's running again. Only this time he's in 
the race for Mayor. Dan is 
very serious about his 
mayoral bid. Because 
to him public 
service is 
no game. 



Mayor 





Pate 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 



North Quincy/Wollaston 




SIX POSTAL WORKERS from the North Quincy Post Office recently received pins for their years of 
service. From left, are Thomas Mills, who received a 25-year pin; Francis IMacPhee, 25 years; Theodore 
Adams, 25 years; John Baldassini, 35 years; John Clifford, 25 years; and station manager Mel vin Kachinsky, 
25 years, who made the presentations and also received a pin. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dave (Ullooly) 

Sacred Heart Outing 
Contest Winners Announced 



Sacred Heart Church, North 
Quincy held its annual parish 
outing recently at Pageant Field, 
Merrymount Park with several 
hundred families attending. 

Winners in the athletic events 
were: 

Under 5 boys: Peter J. Scott (I), 
Shawn Glennon (2), John Hein (3). 
Girls: Patricia Wilke (I), Alison 
Cleary (2), Erin Riley (3). 

Boys 5-6: Stephen O'Brien (1), 
Chris Riley (2), Pat Donaher (3). 
Girls: Christine Welch (I), Tricia 
Driscoll (2), Maureen Wilk (3). 

Boys 7-8: Michael O'Brien (1), 
Sean McCarthy (2), Kevin 
Glennon (3). Girls: Maureen 
OToole (1), Melissa Morad (2), 
Tara Miles (3). 

Boys 9-10: Stephen Tobin (1), 
Stephen Kohler (2), Robert leradi 
(3). Girls: Caitlan O'Brien (1), 
Karen DeLorey (2), Karen 
Hendsbee (3). 

Boys 11-12: Paul Riley (1), 



Vincent Moran (2), Daniel Nelson 
(3). Girls: Julie Croke (1), Chris 
McSweeney (2), Kathy Hendsbee 
(3). 

Boys 13-14: Paul Hennebury( I), 
Edward Monroe (2), Girls: Linda 
Sayres (1), Susan Flaherty (2), 
Michelle Lamb (3). 

Mini Marathon: 

Boys 7-9: Sean McCarthy (1), 
Mike O'Brien (2), Robert leradi 
(3). Girls: Caitland O'Brien (I), 
Maureen OToole (2), Betty Ann 
McSweeney (3), Karen Hendsbee 
(4). 

Boys 10-12: Paul Riley (1), 
Kevin O'Brien (2), Kevin Delorey 
(3). Girls: Julie Croke (1), Chris 
McSweeney (2), Kathy Hendsbee 
(3). 

Girls 13-15: Mary Beth Costello 
(I), Diane Fair (2), Susan Bulger 
(3). 
Baseball toss: 



Boys 5-7: Matthew OToole (1), 
Carl Boomhower (2). Girls: Susan 
Flaherry (1), Kathy Heim (2). 

Boys 8-10: Steven Kohler (1), 
Robert Ierardi (2). Girls: Karen 
Hendsbee (1), Michelle McNulty 
(2). 

Boys 11-13: Kris Meyer (1), 
David Veino (2). Girls: Linda 
Sayers (1), Donna Ierardi (2). 

Boys 14-16: Dan Croke (1), Tim 
Healy (2). Girls: Diane Fair (1), 
Mary Beth Costello (2). 

In team events the sons topped 
the fathers, 10-6, in a baseball 
game while the daughters edged 
the mothers, 16-15, in the annual 
softball game. 

The popular egg toss contest 
was won by Gail and Steve 
Flaherty in the adult group, while 
Matthew Healy and Christopher 
Meyer teamed up to win the 
children's division. 



Rosanne Shontz Receives Masters 



Mrs. Rosanne Viegas Shontz of 

Fenno House Cruise 



The residents of Fenno House, 
540 Hancock St., Wollaston, will 
"Cruise into Summer" on a three 
hour harbor tour with the 
Massachusetts Bay Lines, 
Thursday, July 23. 

They will leave by bus at 10 a.m. 
from Fenno House, taking the 
cruise ship at 1 1 a.m. Luncheon 



will be served on board and they 
will return to Rowes Wharf at 2 
p.m. During the trip residents will 
travel under the Mystic River 
Bridge, see Logan Airport, 
Anthony's Pier 4, The U.S.S. 
Constitution, Boston Harbor 
Islands, Quincy Bay and other 
points of interest. 



239 Farrington St., Wollaston, 
was awarded a masters degree in 
business administration at recent 
commencement exercises at 
Babson College. 

She is a graduate of Archbishop 
Williams High School and Stone- 
hill College. 



UJeaU fct. 
3teh Mnrktt 

35 Years at 35 Beale St. 

Fresh Seafoods Daily 

Cooked Seafoods 
Eat in-or Take out 




INDOORfLAUi OUTDOOR 

State ACCESSORIES Church 

Flag* Flags of AU Nations Flags 

FLAGS MADE TO ORDER 

EAGLE FLAG C0..ING. 



147 Beach St. 
WoUastoo. Mass. 02170 



617 
472-824 2 



Funds Increased $50,000 

Wollaston Home 
Program In 2nd Year 



The Wollaston Home Improve- 
ment Loan Program is entering its 
second year with an increased 
amount of funds, $50,0Q0, for the 
home rehabilitation effort. 

The program, with funding 
from the federal Community 
Development Block Grant, is 
operated through the Planning 
Department and the Colonial 
Federal Savings and Loan 
Association in Wollaston. 

Through the program, Wollas- 
ton residents can eliminate health 
and safety hazards in their homes 
and lessen the financial burden of 
heating costs through conserva- 
tion improvements. 

"Only through such a 
coordinated effort can the 
Wollaston neighborhood be 
conserved and improved for the 



benefit of all residents," said City 
Councillor Stephen J. McGrath. 

He pointed out that to be 
eligible for the loans, residents 
must live within the Wollaston 
Community Development Target 
Area and the homes must be one 
or two-family owner-occupied 
residences. 

There are also maximum gross 
income guidelines calculated by 
household size like this: 

Household of one. $12,200; 
two, $13,950; three, $15,700; 
four, $17,450; five, $18,500; six, 
$19,600; seven, $20,700; eight or 
more, $21,800. 

The income guidelines have 
been raised over the past year at 
McGrath's insistence to permit 
more families to participate in the 
program. 



Dr. Charles Merrill 
CP Trust Coordinator 



Dr. Charles D. Merrill, 204 
Billings St., North Quincy, 
administrator of the Longwood 
Hospital, Jamaica Plain for five 
years until its closing, was 
recently appointed Trust Coordi- 
nator for the Cerebral Palsy of the 
South Shore Area, Inc. 

The new position entails 
specific duties of community 
organization between the 
Huntington General Hospital and 
the Cerebral Palsy of the South 
Shore Area, Inc. which is the 
recipient of a bequest made avail- 
able through the hospital to 
provide services to multiple 
handicapped children from 
Jamaica Plain and surrounding 
communities. 

The Cerebral Palsy of the South 
Shore Area, is a non-profit health 
agency, 105 Adams St., Quincy, 
which sponsors a number of 
programs and services in the area 



of physical restoration, habilita- 
tion, education, recreation, 
prevocation, and socialization. It 
operates a Clinic which offers 
therapeutic, educational and day 
care services for children up to 
age eight, not only for those 
having cerebral palsy, but also 
individuals having any stable 
neurological disorder imposing 
multiple handicaps. 

Dr. Merrill is the former 
president of the Cerebral Palsy of 
the South Shore Area, Inc., and 
former accreditation consultant 
with the NEASC, a Fellow in the 
American Public Health Associa- 
tion, a member of the Phi Delta 
Kappa, a member of the National 
and Massachusetts Leagues for 
Nurses, and a member of the 
American Academy of Medical 
Administrators, as well as being a 
member of many other societies 
and associations. 



Rehab Due For Welcome Young 



Welcome Young Playground in 
Atlantic will be rehabilitated 
starting early next fall with 
federal funds obtained through 
the Community Development 
Block Grant. 

City Councillor Joanne Condon 



said the following improvements 
will be made: 

Resurfacing of the basketball 
and tennis courts and installation 
of new equipment, renovation of 
the children's play area, 
peripheral landscaping and 
rehabilitation of the ball field. 



Margaret Walsh Emmanuel Graduate 



Margaret Julie Walsh, 
daughter of Patricia and Andrew 
Walsh, 36 Stoney Brae Rd., 
Wollaston, was graduated 
recently at the 59th commence- 



Fresh Steamers $1.10 lb. 

Fresh Lobster Meat $14.95 lb. 

Stuffed Flounder with Newburg Sauce 
or 
Baked Haddock with Lemon Butter. Each served with 
French Fries or Potato Salad. $1.95 



Wollaston 479-0039 




ment at Emmanuel College in 
Boston. 

Miss Walsh received a degree 
in business management and will 
spend the summer traveling in 
Europe. 

William Harrow 
Commended 

William Harrow, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Harrow of 62 
Bay St., Squantum, has been 
cited for commendable scholar- 
ship for the spring semester at 
Mitchell College, New London, 
Conn. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building 
a Quincy Sun home 
delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 






i ■ 






. i 



'» - 



'. - ■ 



<■ . 



>, 






Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page II 



Quincy School 
Closing A Night 
To Remember 



More than 350 attended Quincy 
Elementary School's closing 
ceremonies, "A Night to 
Remember", recently. 

North Quincy High School's 
Color Guard posted the colors to 
begin the evening. 

Mrs. Louise McDonald, 
president of the school's parent 
teacher organization, gave the 
welcome. 

Mrs. McDonald asked students 
to remember good times at 
Quincy School and to bring those 
memories to their new schools. 

PTO officers Cathy Rizzitano, 
Vicky Tasney and Mary Lou Clark 
welcomed visitors and helped 
serve refreshments. There were 
musical selections by the Quincy 
School Choir. 

Christine Swierk, a sixth 
grader, related her memories of 
Quincy School. 

H.I\. Center To Hold 
Programs For Children 



Speakers also included Eugene 
Ronayne, assistant principal, 
Daniel Malvesta, principal; 
School Superintendent Dr. 
Lawrence P. Creedon, and School 
Committee member John 
Sullivan. 

"Closing the Quincy School has 
been a difficult time for everyone; 
staff, students and families," 
Malvesta said. The many years of 
education provided by the Quincy 
School has helped to nurture the 
traditions and spirit of this unique 
part of our city called North 
Quincy. 

"Tonight, we tried to honor 
and remember all of those 
hundreds, indeed thousands, of 
people who have served or 
studied in the Quincy Elementary 
School." 

The school's American flag was 
then retired to the Heritage Room 
in the old Lincoln School. 



Programs for tots, ages three to 
six, and children ages six to 11 
will be held during July and 
August at the Houghs Neck 
Community Center, 1 193 Sea St. 

A Tots Reading Program of 
nursery rhymes and fairy tales 
will be held Tuesdays and 
Thursdays, 10 to 1 1 a.m. 



Crafts, nature walks, a picnic 
(with lunches brought by the 
youngsters), and trips for 
children ages six to 11 will be 
conducted Tuesdays and 
Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Pre-registration is required. 
There is a small fee. 

Call Patricia Ridlen at 471-8251 
or 479-7682. 



Carl Tulunjian Lesley Graduate 

Carl K. Tutunjian of Samoset art history at commencement 

Ave.. Merry mount, was awarded exercises held recently by Lesley 

an M. Ed. degree in education and College in Boston. 



JOHN E. FRANKLIN, M.D. 

Announces the Opening of his Office 

FOR THE PRACTICE OF 

INTERNAL MEDICINE 



Office Hours 

by 

Appointment 



59 COODINGION ST. 
OUINCT 

328-7001 



BE A 

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SLEEPER 




SHEETS, BEDSPREADS, BLANKETS 
PILLOWCASES, SLEEPING BAGS 



incoming orders 
through July 30 




EAST MILTON: 551 Adams St HINGHAM: 298 Mem St & Rte 228 
QUINCY: 27AdamsSt. 581Ad»miSt 624 Hancock St 
WEYMOUTH: 242 Washington St COHASSET: 66 South Mem St 




RETIRING OF THE COLORS at Quincy Elementary School was conducted by scouts, from left, Tommy 
Weitbrecht and William Smith, who presented the flag to School Supt. Dr. Lawrence P. Creedon. At right is 
School Committeeman John Sullivan. Some 350 people attended the school's closing ceremony, "A Night to 
Remember". 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Barry Udi*) 

Webster - Point Students Honored 



Two sixth grade students at the 
Daniel Webster School were 
awarded $50 savings bonds 
during the recent awards 
assemblies at the Point-Webster 
Complex. 

They are Nancy Svizzero, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry 



Svizzero, and Brian Hickey, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hickey. 

The American Legion award 
was presented by the Quincy Post 
to Debra Bonvie, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Chester Bonvie, and 
Annamarie Cicerone, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ezio Cicerone. 



The awards, presented 
aniui; llv to ninth grade students 
who exhibit the highest ideals of 
scholarship, leadership and 
service, were made by Post 
Commander George French and 
Robert Leo Eng, awards 
chairman. 




What's New at Wendy's? 
The Special Bacon Burger 

A special bacon burger with 
cheese, tomato & lettuce and 
special sauce served on a 
warm bulky roll $1.85 



Look For our Special 

FREE SOFT DRINK 
FREE FRENCH FRIES 

COUPON OFFER 

Elsewhere in This Paper 



Buy a special bacon burger, 
and get an "all you can eat" 
salad for only 99$ 

Our salad bar has 7 dressings, 

fresh cucumbers , peppers, mushrooms, 

onions, cauliflower etc. 



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Pag* 12 Quino Sun Thurtda). July 9. 1981 



Obituaries 



Cycle Death Cause 
Never Be Known 



Thomas F. Roaohe. 81. 
Retired Firefighter 



May 



A funeral Mass for Thomas F. 
Roache. 84, of Squantum. a 
retired Brookline firefighter, was 
held July 3. at St. Man of the 
Assumption Church. Brookline. 

Mr. Roache died June 30. at 
Brockton Veterans Adminis- 
tration Hospital after a long 
illness. 

Born in Brookline, he was a 
member of the first graduating 
class of St. Mary's School. 

A Navy veteran of World War I, 
he served on the USS Kearsarge 
and the USS Delaware. He also 
served in the Marine Corps 
during World War II. 

Mr. Roache was a member of 



the Brookline Fire Department for 
20 years. He worked at Phillips 
Industrial School following his 
retirement. 

He was a member of the 
Stephen F. Rutledge VFW Post in 
Brookline. 

Mr. Roache is survived by his 
wife. Helen J. (Cotter) Roache; a 
son. Edmond T. Roache of 
Weymouth: a daughter. Sister 
Mary Roache of St. Mary's. 
Melrose; and a brother. James 
Roache of Brookline. 

Funeral arrangements were by- 
George J. Lacy Funeral Home. 
129 Harvard St.. Brookline. 

Burial was in Mt. Calvary 
Cemetery, Boston. 



The cause of a motorcycle 
accident on Sea St. that took the 
lives of Dawn Magee, 19, 79 
Lenox St., Houghs Neck, and a 
Braintree man may never be 
discovered. 

Police Lt. John Flaherty said 
there were no witnesses to the 
accident, which took place about 5 
a.m. Monday, and there was no 
evidence of another vehicle being 
involved in the mishap. 

Police said the motorcycle with 
Miss Magee and David P. 
Ruggles. 30, of Braintree aboard 



apparently struck a curb and 
sailed 35 feet through the air and 
into an apartment house at 141 
Sea St. 

They may have been trying to 
make a right turn from Qirincy 
Shore Drive onto Sea St. at the 
time. 

Flaherty said investigators are 
awaiting the results of toxology 
and blood alcohol level tests 
which should be available in a 
week to 10 days. 

A funeral Mass is to be said 
today (Thursday) at 9 a.m. at 



Blessed Sacrament Church for 
Miss Magee, who was a student 
at the University of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Visiting hours were from 2 p.m. 
to 4 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 9 
p.m. yesterday (Wednesday) at 
Joseph Sweeney Funeral Home, 
74ElmSt.,Quincy. 

She leaves her parents, John 
W. and Donna N. (Fullerton) 
Magee, a brother, John Magee 
Jr., a sister, Kris Ann Magee and 
grandparents, Alberta Fullerton 
and Edna Magee, both of Qirincy. 

Burial plans are incomplete. 



Bernadette Walsh, 68, Former Teacher 



A funeral Mass was scheduled 
for 10 a.m. today (Thursday) at 
St. Ann's Church. Wollaston. for 
Mrs. Bernadette (Casale) Walsh 
of Wollaston. a Quincy school 
teacher for manv vears. 



William C. Reardon, 77. 
Retired Crane Operator 



She died Monday at 
Hospital at the age of 68. 



Citv 



Mrs. Walsh, a Wollaston 
resident for 31 years, formerly 
taught at St. Ann's School, 
Wollaston; Immaculate Concep- 
tion School. Weymouth; and 
Sacred Heart Elementary School, 
Weymouth Landing. 

She leaves her husband, Leo J. 
Walsh; a son. Richard J. Walsh of 



Quincy; and a sister, Alice L. 
Casale of Wollaston. 

Viewing hours were from 2 
p.m. to 4 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 
9 p.m. Wednesday at the 
Keohane Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St.. Wollaston. 

Burial will be in Blue Hill 
Cemeterv. Braintree. 



Funeral services for William C. 
Reardon, 77, of Quincy, a retired 
crane operator for General 
Dynamics, were held Monday at 
Wickens and Troupe Funeral 
Home. 26 Adams St. 



Quincy 
Hearing 
Aid Dispensers 



Hearing aids and 

batteries are now 

available to Medicaid 

Card holders' 



Trials 



773-090 

Robert Kara* 

Certified Ne orinq, 
Aid AvdioUfjitt 



Mr. Reardon died July 2. in 
Quincy City Hospital. 

A lifelong Quincy resident, he 
was former owner of Reardon's 
Oil Service. Quincy. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Carolyn (Blanchard) Reardon; 
two sons. William C. Reardon Jr.. 
of Quincy and Robert F. Reardon 
of Ellenwood. Ga.; two 
daughters. Carolyn B. Reardon of 
Quincy and Elizabeth R. Kitson of 
Pembroke; a brother. Reginald 
Reardon of Milton. N.H.: and 
seven grandchildren. 

Rev. Steele Martin. Rector of 
Christ Episcopal Church, 
officiated at the sen ices. 

Burial was in Mt. Wollaston 
Cemetery. 

Donations in his memory may 
be made to the Memorial Fund of 
Christ Episcopal Church. 12 
Quincy Ave. 



John P. Kramer. 70, Retired Welder 

He is survived by a brother, Dr. 
Edward F. Kramer of 



A funeral Mass for John P. 
Kramer. "0. of Quincy. a retired 
welder, was held Monday at Our 
Lady of Good Counsel Church. 
Merrymount. 

Mr. Kramer died July 2. in 
Quincy City Hospital after a long 



illness. He had lived in Quincy for 
10 vears. 



Born in Boston, he had also 
lived in Dorchester. A World War 
II veteran, he was a retired 
welder for R. F. Systems. 
Cohasset. 



Helen Moore, 70. 
Bargain Center Employee 



Northampton; two sisters, 
Madeline Kramer of Quincy and 
Mrs. Thomas E. Crane of St. 
Petersburg. Fla. and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Funeral arrangements were by 
Keohane Funeral Home. 785 
Hancock St.. Wollaston. 

Burial was in New Calvary- 
Cemetery. Mattapan. 



Funeral services were conducted 
Tuesday for Helen (Nason) 
Moore. "0. a retired employee of 
the Bargain Center, who died 
Saturdav in Carne\ Hospital. 
Boston. 

The Re\. Arthur Curtis of 
Atlantic Methodist Church 
officiated at the services at 
Wickens and Troupe Funeral 



Home. 26 Adams St. 

A native of Brookline. she lived 
in Quincy mo>t of her life. 

She leaves two nephews. George 
Nason and John Nason. both of 
Maine, and a neice. Bernice 
Backman of Falmouth. 

She was the widow of the late 
Clarence Moore. 



Deaths 



64. ol Quincv. at 
of Quints . 



30C 



DOC 



IM*C 



y 

i 



Sweeney JBroikers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, SR. 



1 



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MEMORIAL 
GIFTS 

Luii*'.Oo$ •eitmenl* tiff 

Dco«: canflie* **oi#s 
sacefl ifiws etc 



RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS. 

472-6344 I 

ail s ' 



A. E. GOODHUE CO. 

13-15 School St., Quincy, 472-3090 



Nicola DiBona. 
home. June 30. 

Anthonv J (Jangitano, 
June 29 

Elsie Mar) (L)aus) Glading. of 
South Yarmouth, formerly of 
WolljNton. June 2S. 

Rita (Mechan) Huss. 66. of Quint), 
at Carnc) Hospital. Dorchester. June 
JO 

-Mired P. Mariani. 56. of Quint), at 
Quint) Cit) Hospital. June 30. 

Lawrence H. Ruggles. 74. of Quincy, 
at Quincy Cit) Hospital. June 30. 

Joseph V. Delane). 77. of Quint), at 
Quint) Cit) Hospital. June 29. 

Louis J DiPerri. 66. of Dennisport. 
formerl) of Quint), ai Cape Cod 
Hospital. June 2° 

Juliana (Hill) Sullivan, of Adams 
Shore, in Qumc). Jul) 2. 



3< * w e 



3Q< HJC 




mzmy Funeral £>zt\titz 



DENNIS S. SWEENEY. Director 
Non Sectarian 





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74 ELM ST. 
QUINCY 

773-2728 



326 COPELAND 
W. QUINCY 

773-2728 



Sav^es>or to M Joseph Sweeney 
PARKING FACILITIES 



[—Hancock 



J Monument Co. 

John Ricciuti & Sons Inc. 

295 Hancock St., North Quincy 

[Opposite No, Quincy High School) 

Best Domestic and 

Imported Granite 

Visit Our Large 

and Complete Display 

All Monuments Reasonably Priced --,,. ^m M ~, 

472-3447 

Bronze and Granite Cleaning Estimates on Request. 

Open Mon. thru Sat. by Appointment on Sundays 




Semarc 
*8r0ttjerB 

FUNERAL HOME and CHAPELS 




Donald M. Deware 

Director 



576 Hancock Street, Quincy 
Tel: 472-1 137 

Non Sectarian 
Sen ices rendered to any distance 

39 years under same Ownership and Directorship 



__ 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 13 




ST. JOHN'S CHIRCH, Quincy Center, recently held its first vacation bibleschool. Aide 
Ann McCarthy (third left) helped intermediate students with arts and crafts. From left, 
are Lauren Zaccheo, Alison Johnson, Miss McCarthy, Mary Vo, Kathy Cahilland Kara 
Fletcher. 

Capt., Mrs. Gerald Stephens 
New Salvation Army Officers 






Captain and Mrs. Gerald L. 
Stephens are the new 
commanding officers of the 
Salvation Army Quincy Temple 
Corps. 

The Stephens succeed Major 
and Mrs. Charles Waddington 
who served for 4 years and are 
now assigned to Springfield. 

The Stephens, who previously 
lived in Eagle Mills, N.Y., have 
three young children; Kevin, 
Shawn and Kristen Ann. 

Prior to becoming a Salvation 
Army officer. Captain Stephen's 
early years were spent in the 
insurance business. He held 
licenses to sell insurance and 
mutual funds. 

To satisfy a life-long interest in 

the operation of the airline 
industry, he began a career with 
American Airlines in Buffalo, 
N.Y. in 1954. 

He started in flight operations 
and worked in all departments to 
eventually become airport 
passenger service manager in 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Interested in photography, he 
started a small commercial photo- 
graphy business as a sideline. 

Through a casual acquaintance 
with Salvation Army leaders in 
Ohio, he developed an 
enthusiastic interest in the army. 

In 1968, he became director of 
public relations and service units 
for the Northeastern Ohio division 
of the Salvation Army in Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Through this work, he met and 
married the former Captain 
Kathleen Beatty, then 

commanding officer of Cleveland 
West Park Corps, in 1970. 

Captain Stephens entered the 
School for Officers Training in 
New York City in 1971. He and 

Charismatic Prayer 
Meeting* At Si. John's 

St. John's Charismatic Prayer 
Group will hold prayer meetings 
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. in the 
lower church during the summer. 



Attorney Services 

ALAN H. SEGAL 

328-6545 
848-6272 



175 Quincy Shore 
Drive, Quincy 
400 Franklin St.. 
Braintree 



General Practice 

Criminal & Family Law 

Personal Injury Claims 

Real Estate 

Wills & Trusts 

NO CHARGE FOR FIRST 
OFFICE VISIT 




CAPTAIN, MRS. GERALD STEPHENS 



BEST ENTRIES in the middle group of the Christmas creche competition held during St. 
John's Vacation Bible School are displayed by, from left, front, Ellen Spadorcia, Michael 
Spadorcia, Brian McEvoy and James Marani. Back row, Sean Tyler, Mark Volpe, Nicole 
Alessandro, and Patricia Hennebury. 

(Quincy Sun Photo* by Dave Gillooly) 

Sister Mary Gill Appointed 
Abp. Williams Vice Principal 

Sister Mary T. Gill, SND, has 
been appointed vice principal of 
Archbishop Williams High 
School, Braintree, according to an 
announcement by school principal 
Rev. John Pallard, OMI. 

Sister Gill is a member of the 
Boston Province of the Sisters of 
Notre Dame de Namur. She has 
taught at St. Mary's Regional 
High School, Lynn, for the past 13 
years. Previously, she taught in 
Brighton, Shrewsbury, Waltham 
and South Boston. 

Born in Dorchester, she 
received her early and secondary 
education in Boston schools. 

She has an A.B. degree in 
English from Emmanuel College, 
Boston, and a master's degree in 
English from Salem State 
College. 

Sister Gill has also participated 
in a leadership workshop on 
Catholic Education at Boston 
College. She is certified in Massa- 
chusetts as a school 
administrator. 




SISTER MARY T. GILL, S.N.D. 

Archbishop Williams High 
School is a co-educational 
secondary diocesan school with 
850 students from throughout the 
South Shore. 



Mrs. Stephens were given their 
first appointment together at 
Hackensack, N.J. in June, 1972. 

From there, they were sent to 
Plainfield, N.J. in 1976, and came 
as Troy Temple Commanding 
officers in August, 1978. 

Captain Stephens attended the 
University of Buffalo and Luther 
College with selected work at 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

3 Confirmed 
At Bethany 

Christopher A. Hall, Lisa M. 
Lundin and Susan P. Zeiba 
recently were confirmed into full 
membership in the Bethany 
Congregational Church. 

The young men and women 
were members of a class 
conducted by the Rev. Elden D. J. 
Zuern and William D. Ross. 
They and their families were 
guests at a dinner in the social 
hall. 



Wollaston Church 
of the fNazarene 




37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston 

— Service* — 

Sunday- 11:00 a.m. A 6:00 p.m. 

Wednesday- 7:00 p.m. 

"Your Community Church" 



WHEN I DIE 



DONTHAVEA 
FUNERAL FOR ME 




JUST THROW ME IN THE GROUND 

That is a common statement. There is a problem with it, how- 
ever, when someone we love dies survivors react with strong emo- 
tions. We feel sad, we are upset and we cry. We find it hard to 
believe that death has come. Without formal ceremony we may 
lose an opportunity to gain support from friends and loved ones. 
By not seeing the deceased we lose the chance to confront the 
reality of death. Funerals and visitations can help. Some psychol- 
ogists have said that the funeral and visitation is an important first 
step in adjusting to our loss. Lack of a funeral and visitation will 
have no effect on the deceased but it can have serious conse- 
quences on the survivor. 



<#t* 



Keohane 

FUNERAL HOME, INC 

785 and 333 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY 7733551 




Feeling Guilty? Many 
people do. Reasons range 
from broken homes to 
unbroken habits. What- 
ever the cause, it's an 
ugly feeling. Guilt is 
both the fact of having 
done wrong and the feel- 
ing of blame for doing 
it. It's worst when the 
way you live leaves you 
empty, frustrated, and 
filled with regret. But 
there is a solution. Face 
the fact and remember 
God forgives. Then let 
Him! Before this ad was 
placed we started pray- 
ing for you because we 
care. Give us a chance to 
share. 



Glad Tidings Church 

158 Washington Street 

QUINCY 

...A church where something 
"WONDERFUL" happens 
every Sunday! 

The Church... 

...in Study 9:30 a.m. 

...in Worship 10:45 p.m. 
...in Celebration 6:30 p.m. 
...Comc.be a part.. .help us 
Grow! 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 



Obituaries 



Cycle Death Cause 
Never Be Known 



Thomas F. Roache, 84> 

Retired Firefighter 



May 



A funeral Mass for Thomas F. 
Roache, 84, of Squantum. a 
retired Brookline firefighter, was 
held July 3, at St. Mary of the 
Assumption Church, Brookline. 

Mr. Roache died June 30, at 
Brockton Veterans Adminis- 
tration Hospital after a long 
illness. 

Born in Brookline, he was a 
member of the first graduating 
class of St. Mary's School. 

A Navy veteran of World War I, 
he served on the USS Kearsarge 
and the USS Delaware. He also 
served in the Marine Corps 
during World War II. 

Mr. Roache was a member of 



the Brookline Fire Department for 
20 years. He worked at Phillips 
Industrial School following his 
retirement. 

He was a member of the 
Stephen F. Rutledge VFW Post in 
Brookline. 

Mr. Roache is survived by his 
wife, Helen J. (Cotter) Roache; a 
son, Edmond T. Roache of 
Weymouth; a daughter, Sister 
Mary Roache of St. Mary's, 
Melrose; and a brother, James 
Roache of Brookline. 

Funeral arrangements were by 
George J. Lacy Funeral Home, 
129 Harvard St.. Brookline. 

Burial was in Mt. Calvary 
Cemetery, Boston. 



The cause of a motorcycle 
accident on Sea St. that took the 
lives of Dawn Magee, 19, 79 
Lenox St., Houghs Neck, and a 
Braintree man may never be 
discovered. 

Police Lt. John Flaherty said 
there were no witnesses to the 
accident, which took place about 5 
a.m. Monday, and there was no 
evidence of another vehicle being 
involved in the mishap. 

Police said the motorcycle with 
Miss Magee and David P. 
Ruggles, 30, of Braintree aboard 



apparently struck a curb and 
sailed 35 feet through the air and 
into an apartment house at 141 

Sea St. 

They may have been trying to 
make a right turn from Quincy 
Shore Drive onto Sea St. at the 
time. 



Flaherty said investigators are 
awaiting the results of toxology 
and blood alcohol level tests 
which should be available in a 
week to 10 days. 

A funeral Mass is to be said 
today (Thursday) at 9 a.m. at 

Bernadette Walsh, 68, Former Teacher 



Blessed Sacrament Church for 
Miss Magee, who was a student 
at the University of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Visiting hours were from 2 p.m. 
to 4 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 9 
p.m. yesterday (Wednesday) at 
Joseph Sweeney Funeral Home, 
74 Elm St., Quincy. 

She leaves her parents, John 
W. and Donna N. (Fullerton) 
Magee, a brother, John Magee 
Jr., a sister, Kris Ann Magee and 
grandparents. Alberta Fullerton 
and Edna Magee, both of Quincy. 

Burial plans are incomplete. 



William C. Reardon, 77, 
Retired Crane Operator 



A funeral Mass was scheduled 
for 10 a.m. today (Thursday) at 
St. Ann's Church, Wollaston, for 
Mrs. Bernadette (Casale) Walsh 
of Wollaston, a Quincy school 
teacher for manv years. 

She died Monday at City 
Hospital at the age of 68. 



Mrs. Walsh, a Wollaston 
resident for 31 years, formerly 
taught at St. Ann's School, 
Wollaston; Immaculate Concep- 
tion School, Weymouth; and 
Sacred Heart Elementary School, 
Weymouth Landing. 

She leaves her husband. Leo J. 
Walsh; a son, Richard J. Walsh of 



Quincy; and a sister, Alice L. 
Casale of Wollaston. 

Viewing hours were from 2 
p.m. to 4 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 
9 p.m. Wednesday at the 
Keohane Funeral Home, 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 

Burial will be in Blue 
Cemetery, Braintree. 



785 



Hill 



Funeral services for William C. 
Reardon, 77, of Quincy, a retired 
crane operator for General 
Dynamics, were held Monday at 
Wickens and Troupe Funeral 
Home, 26 Adams St. 



Quincy 
Hearing 
Aid Dispensers 



Hearing aids 
batteries are now 
available to Medicaid 
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Robert Haras 

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Mr. Reardon died July 2, in 
Quincy City Hospital. 

A lifelong Quincy resident, he 
was former owner of Reardon's 
Oil Service, Quincy. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Carolyn (Blanchard) Reardon; 
two sons, William C. Reardon Jr., 
of Quincy and Robert F. Reardon 
of Ellen wood, Ga.; two 
daughters, Carolyn B. Reardon of 
Quincy and Elizabeth R. Kitson of 
Pembroke; a brother, Reginald 
Reardon of Milton, N.H.; and 
seven grandchildren. 

Rev. Steele Martin, Rector of 
Christ Episcopal Church, 
officiated at the services. 

Burial was in Mt. Wollaston 
Cemetery. 

Donations in his memory may 
be made to the Memorial Fund of 
Christ Episcopal Church, 12 
Quincy Ave. 



John P. Kramer, 70, Retired Welder 



A funeral Mass for John P. 
Kramer, 70, of Quincy, a retired 
welder, was held Monday at Our 
Lady of Good Counsel Church, 
Merrymount. 

Mr. Kramer died July 2, in 
Quincy City Hospital after a long 



illness. He had lived in Quincy for 

10 years. 

Born in Boston, he had also 
lived in Dorchester. A World War 

11 veteran, he was a retired 
welder for R. F. Systems, 
Cohasset. 



Helen Moore, 70, 
Bargain Center Employee 



He is survived by a brother, Dr. 
Edward F. Kramer of 
Northampton; two sisters, 
Madeline Kramer of Quincy and 
Mrs. Thomas E. Crane of St. 
Petersburg, Fla. and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Funeral arrangements were by 
Keohane Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 

Burial was in New Calvary 
Cemetery, Mattapan. 



Funeral services were conducted 
Tuesday for Helen (Nason) 
Moore. 70, a retired employee of 
the Bargain Center, who died 
Saturday in Carney Hospital. 
Boston. 

The Rev. Arthur Curtis of 
Atlantic Methodist Church 
officiated at the services at 
Wickens and Troupe Funeral 



lived 



Home, 26 Adams St. 

A native of Brookline. she 
in Quincy most of her life. 

She leaves two nephews, George 
Nason and John Nason, both of 
Maine, and a neice. Bernice 
Backman of Falmouth. 

She was the widow of the late 
Clarence Moore. 



Deaths 




Sweeney Brothers 



HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, SR. 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 

JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS. 

472-6344 



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boohs candles stoles 
sacred vessels etc 



All Memorial gifts promptly 
memonah'pd *i!hou1 charge 

A. E. GOODHUE CO. 

13-15 School St., Quincy, 472-3090 



Nicola DiBona. 64. ol Quincy. at 
home. June 30. 

Anthonv .1 Uangitano, of Quina. 
June 29. 

Elsie Mary (Davis) (ilading. of 
South Yarmouth, formerly of 
Wollaston. June 2S. 

Rita (Mechan) Huss, 66. of Quincy. 
at Carney Hospital. Dorchester. June 
30. 

Alfred P. Mariani, 56. of Quincy. at 
Quincy City Hospital. June 30. 

Lawrence H. Ruggles. 74. ofQuina. 
at Quincy City Hospital. June 30. 

Joseph V. Delaney. 77. of Quincy. at 
Quincy City Hospital. June 29. 

Louis J. DiPerri. 66. of Dennisport. 
formerly of Quincy, at Cape Cod 
Hospital. June 29. 

Juliano (Hill) Sullivan, of Adams 
Shore, in Quincy. July 2. 




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Non Sectarian 






74 ELM ST. 
QUINCY 

773-2728 



326 COPELAND 
W. QUINCY 

773-2728 



Successor to M Joseph Sweeney 
PARKING FACILITIKS 



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Tel: 472-1 137 

Non-Sectarian 
Services rendered to any distance 

39 yea.s under same Ownership and Directorship 



Donald M. Oeware 

Director 



JS^^riftl 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Pap 13 




ST. JOHN'S CHl'RCH, Quincy Center, recently held its first vacation bible school. Aide 
Ann McCarthy (third left) helped intermediate students with arts and crafts. From left, 
are Lauren Zaccheo, Alison Johnson, Miss McCarthy, Mary Vo, Kathy Cahill and Kara 
Fletcher. 

Capt., Mrs. Gerald Stephens 
New Salvation Army Officers 

Captain and Mrs. Gerald L. 
Stephens are the new 
commanding officers of the 
Salvation Army Quincy Temple 
Corps. 

The Stephens succeed Major 
and Mrs. Charles Waddington 
who served for 4 years and are 
now assigned to Springfield. 

The Stephens, who previously 
lived in Eagle Mills. N.Y.. have 
three young children; Kevin, 
Shawn and Kristen Ann. 

Prior to becoming a Salvation 
Army officer, Captain Stephen's 
early years were spent in the 
insurance business. He held 
licenses to sell insurance and 
mutual funds. 

To satisfy a life-long interest in 

the operation of the airline 
industry, he began a career with 
American Airlines in Buffalo, 
N.Y.inl954. 

He started in flight operations 
and worked in all departments to 
eventually become airport 
passenger service manager in 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Interested in photography, he 
started a small commercial photo- 
graphy business as a sideline. 

Through a casual acquaintance 
with Salvation Army leaders in 
Ohio, he developed an 
enthusiastic interest in the army. 

In 1968, he became director of 
public relations and service units 
for the Northeastern Ohio division 
of the Salvation Army in Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Through this work, he met and 
married the former Captain 
Kathleen Beatty, then 

commanding officer of Cleveland 
West Park Corps, in 1970. 

Captain Stephens entered the 
School for Officers Training in 
New York City in 1971. He and 

Charismatic Prayer 

Meeting** At St. John's 

St. John's Charismatic Prayer 
Group will hold prayer meetings 
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. in the 
lower church during the summer. 




CAPTAIN, MRS. GERALD STEPHENS 



BEST ENTRIES in the middle group of the Christmas creche competition held during St. 
John's Vacation Bible School are displayed by, from left, front, Ellen Spadorcia, Michael 
Spadorcia, Brian McEvoy and James Marani. Back row, Sean Tyler, Mark Volpe, Nicole 
Alessandro, and Patricia Hennebury. 

(Quincy Sun Photos by Dare (Ullooly) 

Sister Mary Gill Appointed 
Abp. Williams Vice Principal 

Sister Mary T. Gill, SND, has 
been appointed vice principal of 
Archbishop Williams High 
School, Braintree, according to an 
announcement by school principal 
Rev. John Pallard, OMI. 

Sister Gill is a member of the 
Boston Province of the Sisters of 
Notre Dame de Namur. She has 
taught at St. Mary's Regional 
High School, Lynn, for the past 13 
years. Previously, she taught in 
Brighton, Shrewsbury, Waltham 
and South Boston. 

Born in Dorchester, she 
received her early and secondary 
education in Boston schools. 

She has an A.B. degree in 
English from Emmanuel College, 
Boston, and a master's degree in 
English from Salem State 
College. 

Sister Gill has also participated 
in a leadership workshop on 
Catholic Education at Boston 
College. She is certified in Massa- 
chusetts as a school 
administrator. 




SISTER MARY T. GILL, S.N.D. 

Archbishop Williams High 
School is a co-educational 
secondary diocesan school with 
850 students from throughout the 
South Shore. 



«$k* 



Mrs. Stephens were given their 
first appointment together at 
Hackensack, N.J. in June, 1972. 

From there, they were sent to 
Plainfield, N.J. in 1976, and came 
as Troy Temple Commanding 
officers in August, 1978. 

Captain Stephens attended the 
University of Buffalo and Luther 
College with selected work at 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

3 Confirmed 
At Bethany 

Christopher A. Hall, Lisa M. 
Lundin and Susan P. Zeiba 
recently were confirmed into full 
membership in the Bethany 
Congregational Church. 

The young men and women 
were members of a class 
conducted by the Rev. Elden D. J. 
Zuern and William D. Ross. 
They and their families were 
guests at a dinner in the social 
hall. 



Attorney Services 

ALAN H. SEGAL 

175 Quincy Shore 328-6545 
Drive. Oulncy 

££-■»«. 848-6272 

General Practice 

Criminal & Family Law 

Personal Injury Claims 

Real Estate 

Wills & Trusts 

NO CHARGE FOR FIRST 
OFFICE VISIT 



Wollaston Church 
of the fiNazarene 




37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston 

— Services — 

Sunday- 11:00 a.m. A 6:00 p.m. 

Wednesday- 7:00 p.m. 

"Your Community Church" 



WHEN I DIE 



DONTHAVEA 
FUNERAL FOR ME 




JUST THROW ME IN THE GROUND 

That is a common statement. There is a problem with it, how- 
ever, when someone we love dies survivors react with strong emo- 
tions. We feel sad, we are upset and we cry. We find it hard to 
believe that death has come. Without formal ceremony we may 
lose an opportunity to gain support from friends and loved ones. 
By not seeing the deceased we lose the chance to confront the 
reality of death. Funerals and visitations can help. Some psychol- 
ogists have said that the funeral and visitation is an important first 
step in adjusting to our loss. Lack of a funeral and visitation will 
have no effect on the deceased but it can have serious conse- 
quences on the survivor. 



Keohane 

FUNERAL HOME, INC 

785 and 333 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY 7733551 




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Feeling Guilty? Many 
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filled with regret. But 
there is a solution. Face 
the fact and remember 
God forgives. Then let 
Him! Before this ad was 
placed we started pray- 
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care. Give us a chance to 
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Glad Tidings Church 

158 Washington Street 

QUINCY 

...A church where something 
"WONDERFUL" happens 
every Sunday! 

The Church... 

...in Study 9:30 a.m. 

...in Worship 10:45 p.m. 

...in Celebration 6:30 p.m. 

.Comc.be a part. ..help us 
Grow! 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 

Colin Duncan Nominated For Award 



Colin Duncan of Quincy, a 
junior at the Norfolk County 
Agricultural School in Walpole 
has been nominated for the 
University of Massachusetts 
Chancellor's Talent Award. 

Duncan will attend a one-day 
program on the UMass campus 
with nominees from other high 



schools across the state. Forty of 
them will receive awards in 
recognition of academic talent. 

Duncan is majoring in plant 
sciences at Norfolk and works for 
a landscaping company as his 
summer work experience. He is a 
member of Future Farmers of 
America and plays soccer and 
basketball. 



Fitzfr 



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Dresses of Distinction 

Dresses 

an<4 
Coordinated 
Fashion 
Sportswear 



The Shop 
will open 

Thursday 
July 16th 



For 
July 
Sundresses^ 

reg *24 M) 

$17.50 




The same 

distinctive styles 

that you are 

used to finding 

at 

Jritz&erald's 



now 



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At The Granary 

14 North Street 

Hingham, MA 

749-2242 



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Gold Pendant Only $22.75 

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Please send Pendant (s) 

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5% Sales Tax for Mass. Residents 

A I I OW 3 to 5 Weeks For Delivery - 30 day money back guarantee 



Atty. John M. Corcoran Re-elected 
Quincy Red Cross Chairman 



Quincy Atty. John M. Corcoran 
was re-elected to a second term as 
chairman of the Greater Quincy 
Chapter of the American Red 
Cross at the organization's 60th 
annual meeting recently. 

During his first year term, 
Corcoran saw the chapter move its 
headquarters twice: from its 20 year 
home at 57 Revere Rd., Quincy, to 
Braintree and then to its offices in 
the South Shore Regional Red 
Cross Headquarters, 200 Middle 
St., East Weymouth. 

He also led the local group in 
celebrating the 100th birthday of 
the American Red Cross. 

The Greater Quincy Chapter 
will celebrate its 60th anniversry 
Sept. 21. 

Other officers elected at the 
meeting at the Viking Club, 
Braintree, were Mrs. Helen A. 
Shea of Quincy and Mary P. Valle 
of Squantum, assistant vice 
president of South Shore Bank, 
vice chairmen; Frederick J. 
Sheehan of Weymouth, a Quincy 
attorney, secretary; Doris A. 
Morford of Weymouth, assistant 
vice president of Quincy 
Cooperative Bank, treasurer; Gail 
Morse of Cohasset, manager of the 
South Quincy Branch of the 
Quincy Savings bank, assistant 
treasurer. 

Elected to the board of directors 
were Mrs. Dottie Dignan of 
Braintree; J. Ian Dodds of 
Hingham, president, Boston Gear 
lncom International, Inc.; and 
Roydon Burke of Quincy. 

William Y. Walker, chairman of 
water safety for the chapter, 
presented Sandra Stover with a 
certificate of appreciation for 520 




*i 



JOHN M. CORCORAN 



hours of volunteer service teaching 
water safety courses, CPR and first 
aid courses. 

Volunteer service pins were 
presented to the following: 

Thirty year pin: Betty Prohaska. 

Twenty year pins: George 
Bennett, Alice Clark, Janet 
Dimmock, Edna Hesford, Gina 
Parker and Vera Reilly. 

Fifteen year pins: Emily 
Asklund, Loretta Berry, Lucia 
Bodycote, Joyce Card, William 
Souden and William Walker, Jr. 

Ten year pins: Mary Bonney, 
Marjorie Benvie, Marie Corayer, 
Caroline Crane, Emma Donahue, 
Tess Harcourt, Marion Home, 
William Home, Mary McCue, 
Lena Montegani, Irene Romanno, 
Ann Schiavo, Goldie Stepner, 
Toba Stoller and Dorothy 
Watson. 

Five year pins: Judith Bardfield, 
Dorothy Berman, Edith Cameron, 
Sadie DiPasqua, Carol Duggan, 



Josephine Gabeaur, Norma 
Gacicia, Roberta Gray, Rose 
Hillman, Olive Kenney, Mary 
Marchese, Kay Mumbler, Duncan 
MacLean, Arlene Noonan, Joseph 
Odermatt, Helen Shea, Beverly 
Singer, Linda Small, Kathy 
Sanderson, Dorothy Turinking- 
ton, Susan Vanelli and Lee 
Wayland. 

Certificates of appreciation were 
presented to Mary P. Valle, who 
retired after three years as chapter 
treasurer to become chapter vice 
chairman; Peter J. Benelli, who 
retired as chapter vice chairman 
after two years and has also served 
as chairman of the nominatipn 
committee for two years; and to 
Thomas M. Pelletier as retiring 
assistant treasurer after two years 
of service during which time he was 
chairman of the second annual 
Red Cross Night at the Music 
Circus. 

The Quincy Rotary Club and 
Boston Gear Division lncom 
International Inc. were presented 
Pacesetter Awards for their 
financial support of the American 
Red Cross. 

The 1981 communications 
awards were presented to the 
Patriot Ledger, The Quincy Sun, 
Braintree Star, Braintree Forum 
and Observer, Holbrook Sun, 
Randolph Herald, Randolph 
Moneysaver and radio station 
W.1DA. 

Keynote speaker was Chief 
Yeoman Rick Enright of theSouth 
Weymouth Naval Air Station. 
Toastmistress was Dr. Luleen 
Anderson, coordinator of 
elementary guidance services for 
the Quincy Public Schools. 



SOUTH SHORE 
ST SAVINGS BANK 



wey-bA Nk] the 1 

for 30, 60, 89 day— 

Repurchase Agreements 

High Rate • Guaranteed Return • Fully Secured 



15.50% 



Rate as of July 8, 1981 
Subject to daily change. 



Q on $5,000 
for 30-89 days 



(minimum 
investment) 



The Repurchase Agreement is not a savings account or deposit and therefore is not insured by the Deposit 
Insurance Fund of Massachusetts. However, it is secured by United States Treasury or Agency securities in our 
portfolio. 

'Annual Percentage Rale. Weymouth Savings Bank reserves the right to modify or terminate this oiler at anytime Redemption prior to maturity are 
not allowed interest will not be paid beyond the maturity date ol the agreement Interest is calculated on a 365 day year, is payable to maturity and is 
not compounded Individuals investing in Repurchase Agreements should consult their tax advisor 



(call today for latest rate.) 

6 mo. & 30 mo. Money Market Certificates 

6 month certificates ♦* tltectiue J"'v 7 - July 13 

15.027%~ 14.30% 



Equivalent rate based on renewal of principal $10,000 minimum deposit 
& interest at end of six months at the same rate. 

Federal regulations prohibit compounding of interest. Withdrawal of principal not permitted prior to 
maturity. If funds are withdrawn before maturity, interest will be forfeited. Offer subject to 
wuthdrawwai without notice. 

OFFER SUBJECT TO WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE - ALL DEPOSITS INSURED IN FULL 



30 month certificates available 
only $500 minimum deposit. 



383 Bridge St., North Weymouth 
372 Quincy Ave., Braintree 
295 Washington St.. Weymouth 
47 Washington St., Weymouth Landing 




337-2700 



Hosts Braintree Friday 

Morrisette Hopes 

To Rebound After 

2 Straight Losses 



Thursday, July 9, I9SI Quincy Sun Page 15 



Morrisette Legion's baseball 
team was held to four hits Monday 
night and lost to Canton, 5-1, for 
its second loss in a row, dropping 
its record to 8-4 in Zone 6. 

Morrisette is a game behind 
Weymouth (9-3) in Division B, 
while Braintree leads in Division 
A. 

Morrisette will host Braintree 
Friday night at 8 at Adams Field, 
will be home to Holbrook Monday 
at 8 at Adams and will meet 
Wollaston next Wednesday at 8 at 
Adams. 

Mike Morris was the starting 
pitcher Monday night for 
Morrisette and pitched well except 
for the second inning when Canton 
scored all its runs. Morris was the 
victim of poor support in that 
inning. A bases loaded triple by 
Canton's shortstop was the big 
blow. 



Marty McLoughlin, John 
Balzano, Brian Reale and Jim 
Bandera had the only hits for 
Morrisette. 

Last Friday Weymouth came 
from behind to edge Morrisette, 6- 
5, in a game that had been fogged 
out two nights earlier. 

Weymouth had taken a 1-0 
lead in the top of the first but Paul 
Earle singled in the tying run in 
the bottom half. Weymouth scored 
twice in the fourth for a 3-1 lead, 
but Morrisette scored four in the 
bottom half for a 5-3 lead. Bob 
Beniers' two-run double was the 
key hit. 

In its previous game Morrisette 
had pounded Quincy, 11-2, with 
Gary DiNardo improving his 
pitching record to 4-1. 

Morrisette collected 15 hits with 
Danny Boyle, McLoughlin, 
Beniers, Mark Millane, Steve 



Pecevich, Kevin Howlett and 
Mike Marshall having two hits 
each. 

Quincy will face Randolph 
Friday at 6 o'clock at Adams Field, 
will be home to Brockton Monday 
at 6 at Adams and will meet 
Weymouth next Wednesday at 6 at 
Adams. 

Wollaston lost a 2-1 squeaker to 
Randolph, despite another 
outstanding pitching performance 
by Rich Hallberg. Hallberg earlier 
had defeated Randolph by the 
same score. 

Steve Belcastro drove in 
Wollaston's only run in the seventh 
but he was thrown out at third base 
trying to stretch a double. 

Wollaston will play at Canton 
Friday at 6, will be at Braintree 
Monday at 6 and will face 
Morrisette next Wednesday night 
at 8 at Adams. 




Pellegrini Baseball Clinic 
At Adams Field Aug. 5 



BILL O'CONNELL of North Quincy has been awarded a varsity 
baseball letter at Bentley College. O'Connell, a freshman, started every 
game in center field this season, finishing with a .228 batting average and 
had 17 RBIs, fourth best on the team. He also scored 15 runs and had 16 
walks for an on base percentage of .350. A 1980 graduate of North Quincy 
High, he is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gerald O'Connell of Farrington St. 



Boston College coach and 
former Red Sox player Eddie 
Pellegrini of Weymouth is now 
conducting his ninth annual free 
baseball clinics throughout the 
Greater Boston area. 

Pellegrini and his staff will be at 
Adams Field in Quincy 
Wednesday, Aug. 5, at 10 a.m. The 
clinic will be sponsored by the 
Quincy Recreation Dept. and 
Pepsi-Cola bottling company of 
Milton. 

The objective of the program is 
to make major league playing and 
training available to hometown 



youngsters and all those over six 
years of age are eligible to attend. 
Pellegrini, who is being assisted 
by John (Tinker) Connelly of 
Northeastern University, Dick 
*Moe" Maloney of Watertown 
High and Bobby DeFelice, former 
Red Sox minor league catcher, 
began his two-a-day clinics on 
June 24 and will have conducted 
nearly 50 when they end on Aug. 5. 
The staff conducts morning and 
afternoon clincs nearly every day. 

Pellegrini may best be 
remembered as the rookie who hit 
the game-winning homer — his 



first time at bat for the Red Sox. 
He followed that with another 
homer, triple and double in his 
second game. He spent 10 years in 
the major leagues with the Red 
Sox, Pirates and Reds. 

Pellegrini has earned a 
reputation as the game's Goodwill 
Ambassador. As many as 500 
eager youngsters have shown up at 
one of the free clinics. 

He has been coach at Boston 
College since 1954, turning out 
many championship teams, 
winning a number of post-season 
playoff spots, several regional and 
college world series teams. 



Sports 



Houghs Neck Wins Behind 
Ciardi's One-Hitter 



BoSox Club Sponsoring 
15 For Ted Williams Camp 



The BoSox Club has announced 
that, again this year, the club will 
sponsor 15 young baseball players 
for a full week of instruction at the 
Ted Williams Baseball Camp in 
Lakeville. 

All young players, 1 1 to 16 years 
of age, are invited to write to the 
BoSox Club and in their own 
words tell why they would like to 

Hancock Bank 
Setting Hot Pace 

Hancock Bank is leading the 
South Shore Bankers Softball 
League with a 9-0 record, holding a 
three-game lead over State Street 
Bank (6-3). 

South Weymouth Savings is 6-4, 
Bay Bank Norfolk 4-4, Quincy 
Savings Bank and South Shore 
Bank 3-6 and Quincy Co-operative 
Bank 1-9. 

Last week Hancock walloped 
South Weymouth, 1 1-1, and South 
Shore edged Quincy Co-operative, 
13-12, while the Quincy Savings 
Bay Bank Norfolk game was 
fogged out. 



be selected to go to the camp for a 
week in August. 

In the past many Quincy players 
have been selected to spend a week 
at the camp. 

Letters should be sent to the 
BoSox Club, Fenway Park, 
Boston 02215. All letters must be 
received by July 24. 

Prior to camp the winners and 
their parents will attend a BoSox 
Club luncheon. 



America's Finest 

ATHLETIC 
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for the entire family 



EXPERT 
EMBROIDERY 

Done on our Premises 

JUNIOR S ADULT 6X 
Group Prices Available 



The BoSox Club is a non-profit 
organization of more than 500 
business and industry leaders in 
Greater Boston dedicated to 
furthering interest in baseball at all 
levels of play. 



Joe Ciardi, making his first Babe 
Ruth League pitching start, turned 
in a one-hitter as Houghs Neck 
defeated Barry's Deli, 4-2. 

Ciardi struck out 10 and walked 
only two as he lost a shutout when 
Barry's scored both runs in the 
fifth inning which gave Barry's a 2- 
1 lead. 

Bill Foley had two hits, 
including a two-run triple to give 
HN the lead, and 1 3-year-old Greg 



McGlame singled in Foley with an 
insurance run. Peter Furtado, 
Chris Hurley, Chip Griffin, Ciardi 
and Joe Conti all had hits for 
Houghs Neck. 



1973 Hardtop Gran 
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471-3100 
9 a.m. - 6 p.m. 



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4723090 




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Hours: 8 to 5:30 Mon. thru Fri. 






• • 'is . 



.». - 



/•,->•. . 



i£. 



4 •• ■' 
± v ■ 



- '^aLi 






4 



rage 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, Jul\ 9, 1981 



Lincoln-Hancock 
Pool Schedule 



The Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment announces the following 
summer schedule of swimming at 
the Lincoln-Hancock Community 
School pool for residents who 
have obtained pool participation 
cards: 

Monday - Youth 6-12, 5 p.m. to 
5:50 p.m.; family, 6 p.m. to 6:50 
p.m.: youth 13-18, 7 p.m. to 7:50 
p.m.; adult. 8 p.m. to8:50p.m. 

Tuesday - Youth 6-12, 5 p.m. to 
5:50 p.m.; family, 6 p.m. to 7:50 
p.m.; adult, 8 p.m. to8:50 p.m. 

Wednesday - Youth 6-12, 5 
p.m. to 5:50 p.m.; family, 6 p.m. 
to 6:50 p.m.; youth 13-18, 7 p.m. 
to 7:50 p.m.; adult, 8 p.m. to 8:50 
p.m. 

Thursday - Youth 6-12, 5 p.m. 
to 5:50 p.m.; family, 6 p.m. to 
7:50 p.m. adult, 8 p.m. to 8:50 
p.m. 



Friday - Youth 6-12, 5 p.m. to 
5:50 p.m.; family, 6 p.m. to 6:50 
p.m.; youth 13-18, 7 p.m. to 7:50 
p.m.; adult, 8 p.m. to 8:50 p.m. 

Saturday - Youth 6-12, 1 p.m. 
to 1:40 p.m.; family, 1:50 p.m. to 
3:20 p.m.; youth 13-18, 3:30 p.m. 
to 4: 10 p.m.; adult, 4:20 p.m. to 5 
p.m. 

Sunday - Youth 6-12, 1 p.m. to 
1:40 p.m.; family, 1:50 p.m. to 
3:20 p.m.; youth 13-18, 3:30 p.m. 
to4:10 p.m.; adult, 4:20 p.m. to 5 
p.m. 

Pool participation cards are 
available to Quincy residents of 
all ages with a variety of member- 
ship plans including half year and 
full year for youth, family, adult 
and senior citizen categories. 

Memberships may be 

purchased in the pool lobby 
during the swim programs. 



Propane Gas 

Cylinders filled on our premises 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Charmglow gas grills & accessories 
Available at special low prices 

South Shore Heating 
and Air Conditioning Inc. 

38 Greenwood Ave. 
E.Weymouth 337-6100 



PRESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPING 
AND CONSTRUCTION CORP. 

* Asphalt and Concrete Work 

* Fences Furnished and Installed 

* Trees and Shrubs Planted 
and Maintained 

* General Grounds Maintenance 

Call Today For A Free Estimate 

472-2000 

20% off on all jobs with this ad. 



9 " '■ - : " B 

Rick Nichols, Store Manager 

MY OLDER HOME HAS OIL-BASED 
PAINT ON IT. IT'S IN GOOD SHAPE. 
CAN I APPLY THE COLOR I LIKE 
IN LATEX OVER THIi? 

With good surface preparation latex paint 
can be applied over oil-based paint. Wash 
off any chalk, (most important) sand, 
scrape, and prime any bare spots, before 
applying the latex finish coat. Latex does 
have some advantages over oil-base 
house paint. Good color retention, quick 
dry and painting over slightly damp 
surfaces are some advantages of using 
latex paints. For the best solutions to 
your problems be sure to ask the 
"problem solvers" at Hancock Paint. 



HANCOCK 



PAINT 
WALLPAPER 
AND RUG 
CENTERS 




AWARD WINNERS and coaches honored at Quincy High Hockey Boosters Club banquet. Left to right, 
junior varsity coach Jack Crowley, Red Fury, position player; John Baylis, point man; Paul Flynn, tough 
competitor; Ken Ryan, hustler, and head coach Bob Sylvia. All varsity and junior varsity players and 
cheerleaders were honored. Club president Ace Abboud received a plaque which will be hung in the trophy 
cabinet at the Youth Arena with the officers' names imprinted on it. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Harry Bucler) 

Beach Swimming Schedule 



The Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment announces the following 
schedule of swimming instruction 
at the city's beaches for 
Wednesday, July 8 through 
Friday, July 10 and for the week 
of July 13-17: 

Wednesday, July 8. beach 
hours are from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. 
The schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 3 
p.m.; non-swimmer 2, 3:30 p.m.; 
beginner 1, 4 p.m.; beginner 2, 
4:30 p.m.; advanced beginner, 
6:30 p.m.; intermediate 7 p.m.; 
swimmer, 7:30 p.m.; basic rescue 
and advanced life saving, 5 p.m. 
to 6:30 p.m. 

Thursday, July 9, beach hours 
are from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer 1. 3 
p.m.; non-swimmer 2, 3:30 p.m.; 
beginner 1. 4 p.m.; beginner 2, 
4:30 p.m.; advanced beginner. 5 
p.m.; intermediate, 5:30 p.m.; 
swimmer, 6 p.m.; basic rescue 
and advanced life saving, 6:30 
p.m. to8p.m. 

Friday, July 10, beach hours 
are from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. The 



schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 3 
p.m.; non-swimmer 2, 3:30 p.m.; 
beginner 1, 4 p.m.; beginner 2, 
4:30 p.m.; advanced beginner, 5 
p.m.; intermediate, 5:30 p.m.; 
swimmer, 6 p.m.; basic rescue 
and advanced life saving, 6:30 
p.m. to8p.m. 

Monday, July 13, beach hours 
are from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer I, 12 
noon; non-swimmer 2, 12:30 
p.m.; beginner 1, 11 a.m.; 
beginner 2, 11:30 a.m.; advanced 
beginner, 10:30 a.m.; inter- 
mediate, 10 a.m.; swimmer, 9:30 
a.m.; basic rescue and advanced 
life saving. 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. 

Tuesday, July 14, beach hours 
are from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 12 
noon; non-swimmer 2, 12:30 
p.m.; beginner 1, 11 a.m.; 
beginner 2, 11:30 a.m.; advanced 
beginner, 9 a.m.; intermediate, 
8:30 a.m.; swimmer, 8 a.m.; basic- 
rescue and advanced life saving, 
9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

Wednesday. July 15, beach 



"hours are from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

""The schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 1 
p.m.; non-swimmer 2, 1:30 p.m.; 
beginner 1, 9 a.m.; beginner 2, 
9:30 a.m.; advanced beginner, 
12:30 p.m.; intermediate, 10 
a.m.; swimmer, 10:30 a.m.; basic 
rescue and advanced life saving, 
1 1 a.m. to 12:30p.m. 

Thursday, July 16, beach hours 
are from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 1 
p.m.; non-swimmer 2, 1:30 p.m.; 
beginner 1, 9 a.m.; beginner 2, 
9:30 a.m.: advanced beginner, 
12:30 p.m.; intermediate, 10 
a.m.; swimmer, 10:30 a.m.; basic 
rescue and advanced life saving. 

1 1 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 

Friday, July 17, beach hours 
are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 2 
p.m.; non-swimmer 2, 2:30 p.m.; 
beginner 1, 10 a.m.; beginner 2, 
10:30 a.m.; advanced beginner. 
1:30 p.m.; intermediate, 11 a.m.; 
swimmer, 11:30 a.m.; basic 
rescue and advanced life saving, 

12 noon to 1:30 p.m. 



Presidents Marathon Set For Sept. 13 



The second annual City of 
Presidents Marathon (26.2 miles) 
will be held Sunday. Sept. 13, at 9 
a.m. with the course being run 
almost entirely within the city of 
Quincy. 

Many veteran marathoners 
competed in the first race last year 
with Quincy's Jim Capemito 
winning in 2:36.47. The race is run 
tw ice over the same 1 3. 1-mile loop. 

There are some hills, but for 



most part, the course is flat and 
fast, taking the runners by the 
John Adams and John Quincy 
Adams birthplaces, the Adams 
Historical site and other nationally 
known landmarks that have made 
a place in history. The race starts 
and finishes in front of the First 
Parish Church. 

Fntry fee is S5.00. T-shirts will 
be given to all participants and 
certificates to all finishers. The 



♦ 
♦ 



♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

I 

♦ 



♦ 



LAS VEGAS NIGHT 

Saturday, July 11, 1981 
7:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. 

at 

Knights of Pythias Hall 

11 Evans Drive (corner Central) 

Stoughton, Mass. 

Admission $2 

Cash Prizes Central Air Conditioned 

Cash door prizes hourly 
Free Refreshments Bar available 

Sponsored by Handi-Kids for Handi-Kids 



♦ 

♦ 



♦ 
♦ 



race is sanctioned by the N.E. 
Athletic Congress, is fully certified 
and can he run as a Boston 
Marathon qualifier. 

The marathon is sponsored by 
the South Boston Savings Bank 
and The Patriot ledger. 

For further information 
regarding the race and entry 
blanks, call race director Brian 
Devin at 436-3000. or write to the 
City of Presidents Marathon. 79 
Coddington St.. Quincy 02169. 

Roger Kvam 

Receives Degree 

Roger A. Kvam Jr.. son of the 
Rev. and Mrs. Roger A. Kvam. 
262 Franklin St., South Quincy. 
received a degree in physical 
education recently at the 122nd 
commencement at Wheaton 
College, Wheaton, 111. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building 
a Quincy Sun home 
delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



QUINCY - 714 ADAMS ST. 
At the Milton-Quincy Line 



Hedge Pruning 
Yard Renovation 
Poolside Landscaping 




Wood Fences & Repairs 
Decks & Retaining Walls 
Shrub Planting & Pruning 



Call Now For Free Estimate 

4718824 WHITTEMORE BROS. 4726904 

Graduate of Stockbridge School of Agriculture 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 17 



• Junior League 

DiBartolo Leads 

Foley To A.L. 

Championship 



Jay DiBartolo pitched and 
batted Foley Plymouth-Chrysler 
to the Quincy Junior Baseball 
League American League 
championship with a 7-4 victory 
over the Elks. 

The win improved Foley's 
record to 16-3. 

In the National League Boston 
Gear and Rotary have identical 
16-3 records and clinched playoff 
berths. 

DiBartolo pitched a five-hitter, 
struck out seven and walked only 
one and he also hit a three-run 
homer, a solo homer and a triple. 
Both homers (he has eight this 
year) went out of Artery Field 
with plenty to spare. Sean Gately 
had two doubles and just missed a 
homer by inches and he also 
made a fine running catch in left 
field. Tim Tagen, catching his 
first complete game, did a fine job 
handling DiBartolo. He also had 
two singles. Kevin Duffy and Bob 
Laracy had RBI singles and Kyle 
Robertson and Dan Biagini each 
had a hit and scored a run. Chris 
Marshall scored a run and played 
a fine defensive game as did 
Chris Meyer at first base. 

Foley has a five-game lead over 
Sears with four games to play. 

Foley's rolled over Keohane's, 
12-0, with DiBartolo pitching a 
two-hitter, striking out five and 
not walking a batter. He also had 
a single and scored a run. 
Marshall had three hits, including 
a long home run out of Artery 
Field and scored twice. Gately 
had three hits including a triple, 
Meyer had two singles and scored 
two runs, Biagini had two singles 
and scored twice, Duffy had a 
double and Robertson and Laracy 
had singles. Foley's turned in 
another outstanding defensive 
game and played errorless ball. 
The team has allowed only six 
runs in the last 30 innings. 

Burgin Platner enjoyed a 
fruitful week with three victories. 

Burgin scored two runs in the 
bottom of the sixth inning to edge 
Sears, 8-7. Matt Ostiguy singled, 
Tom McDonald walked and Mark 
DiMattio singled to load the 
bases. A walk to Steve Hensley 
forced in the tying run and Chris 
Conway was hit by a pitch, 
forcing in the winner. 

Sears opened with a run in the 
top of the first when Jim Dineen 
singled and Tom Casey doubled, 
Burgin tied it in the bottom half 
when Brian Mosher singled, 
McDonald walked and Mosher 
scored on an infield out. 

Sears took the lead with a run 
in the second on a Dan Ramondi 
single, a walk and an infield out. 
Sears took a 4-1 lead in the 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 
W L 

* Foley 16 3 

Sears 1 1 8 

Kiwanis 10 9 

Burgin Platner 9 10 

Remick's 7 12 

VFW 3 16 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

** Boston Gear 16 3 

** Rotary 16 3 

Elks 7 1 2 

HN Legion 7 1 2 

Keohane's 6 13 

Colonial 6 1 3 

* Clinched Division title 
** Clinched playoff berth 

third when Bob Hubbard walked, 
Casey doubled in Hubbard and 
Casey scored on a passed ball. 
Burgin scored a run in the bottom 
of the inning when Mosher and 
Ostiguy singled and DiMattio 
reached on an error. 

Burgin moved to within 4-3 in 
the fourth on Hensley's home run 
over the left-center field fence. 

In the fifth Sears scored two 
more runs on singles by Casey, 
Steve Austin and Tom Logan, but 
Burgin tied it at 6-6 with three 
runs in the bottom of the inning. 
DiMattio and John Mooney 
singled and Hensley walked to fill 
the bases. Nine-year-old Dale 
Santosuosso singled home two 
runs and Bob Thomas singled 
home the tying run. 

Sears took a 7-6 lead in the top 
of the sixth on Logan's single, a 
stolen base and Austin's single, 
setting the state for Burgin's 
winning rally in the bottom half of 
the inning. 

Burgin breezed past Colonial 
Federal, 17-8, with McDonald 
having two triples and two 
doubles, DiMattio three singles 
and a double and Ostiguy, 
Santosuosso, Hensley, Walter 
Downing, John Quinlan, Conway 
and Thomas a single each. 

For Colonial, Tank McNamara 
had a home run and single, 
Happy Happs a double and John 
Gleba, Pete Farrand and Dave 
Sacchetti a single each. 

Burgin also bombed Houghs 
Neck, 23-2, with Mosher having 
three singles, Ostiguy a triple and 
double, McDonald a homer and 
two singles, DiMattio two singles 
and a double, Thomas two singles 
and Chris Boudreau, Billy 
Murphy, Hensley, Quinlan and 
Downing a single each. 

For Houghs Neck Mark 
Lindenfelzer had a double and 
Joe Innello and Austin O'Malley a 
single each. 



Phillies Tryouts July 1 1 

approval from their coach. 



The Philadelphia Phillies will 
hold a tryout camp Saturday, July 
II, at 10 a.m. at Rockland 
Memorial Stadium with area scout 
Ed DiRamio of Quincy in charge. 

Players 16-21 years of age in full 
uniform are invited. Legion 
players must bring a letter of 




WINNERS in the Merry mount Association holiday road race were, left to right, Paul Kane, first place in the 
over- 30 class and second place overall; Matt Corbett, overall winner in 14 minutes, 58 seconds; Regina 
Hussey, first place in the over-40 class; and Paul Hussey, third place in the over-40 class. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dave Gillooly) 

Milano, Logan Trying Out 
For Olympic Hockey Team 



Rich Milano and Patrick Logan 
of Quincy, two of 10 top hockey 
players (17 years old) from 
Massachusetts are in Colorado 
Springs this week trying out for the 
1984 Olympic hockey team. 

Milano, a senior next year at 
Don Bosco High, was cut from the 
varsity squad last season and 
played for the South Shore Braves 
of the New England Junior 
League. Quincy High coach Bob 



Sylvia, who also coaches the 
Braves, is one of Milano's 
staunchest boosters. 

"Rich just wouldn't quit," said 
Sylvia. "He came over here from 
Don Bosco's junior varsity and 
held his own for the Braves against 
some outstanding opposition. He 
really impressed a lot of people. 

"Rich is just ~oming into his own 
as a hockey player. He'll have to 
face some tough competition out 
there, but I wouldn't count him out 



of it. I'm sure they'll be impressed 
with his desire. I've got a lot of 
respect for him and I hope he 
makes it." 

Logan played for Don Bosco 
last season as a sophomore. He 
played in many South Boston 
leagues before going to Don Bosco 
and this spring played for the 
Suffolk County Seals. 

He has already been to Oregon 
and Detroit in youth hockey. 



Donahue Seeks Berth 
On Olympic Track Team 



Brian Donahue of Quincy, a 
graduate of Abp. Williams High 
School and one of the top shot 
putters in the country on the prep 
school level, will be trying out for 
the 1984 Olympics at the end of 
this month in Colorado Springs. 

He also has been invited to a 
New York Olympic training camp 
in August. 

Donahue, who competes for the 
Quincy Track Club, went to 
Exeter Academy last season and 
the 18-year old, 6-4, 245-pounder 
kept lifting weights and worked 
on his specialty. 

He won the shot put in the 
Dartmouth Relays and finished 
third in the Junior Nationals in 
Knoxville, Tenn. Late in the 
spring he was first with a toss of 
66-1 in the International Prep 
Invitational championships in 
Chicago against athletes from the 
U.S. and abroad. 

Brian will attend the University 
of Texas next fall. "I had a lot of 
schools to choose from, but I felt 
Texas offered me the best 
opportunity in track because of 
the weather and because of the 
calibre of competition I'll be 



facing. 

Brian's uncle, John, now a 
resident of Texas, was the state 
shot put champion while 
attending Quincy High. 

His brother Fred was one of the 
state's top weightmen a few years 
ago while at Quincy High but a 
dislocated elbow ended his 
career. 

"I've been throwing the shot 
since I was 12," Donahue said. 
"My brother used to have me out 
working with him. I loved football 
(he was an outstanding schoolboy 
football player), but I felt the 
Olympics was something I had a 



chance to attain and I feel you 
only get so many chances in your 
lifetime for something special like 
that. I've been thinking about the 
Olympics for three years." 

At Exeter last year he set a 
school record of 63-lOVi and also 
set a record in the New England 
championships. 

"Brian is an outstanding 
competitor and I think he has a 
fine chance of making the 
Olympics," said Quincy Track 
Club coach Jeff Hennessy. "He 
represented us in the Dartmouth 
Relays and the Junior Nationals 
in Knoxville and did a great job." 



Stay Alivel 



I 



AIR CONDITIONING 
SERVICE 

Electrical 

Controls 

Complete System Service 

MORSE'S 

Auto Radiator 

1 79 W Squantwm St. 

Walk To the No. Quincy T 

3287464 



AIR CONDITIONED 

OLINDY'S 

170 Quincy Ave. 472-3597 
Summer Prices 

Day's AC4 Evening's 

^m Orptr string 

SPECIAL 

SATURDAY MORNING 
3 STRINGS for 



per string 



9 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. 



By John Vatante 



ROTARY MOWER 
LEADING HOME MENACE 



Ever since the rotary mower 
became popular about 15 years 
ago, it has been a leading cause of 
home accidents. Each year 
(according to Public Health 
statistics) more than 140,000 
injuries requiring medical 
attention are caused by these 
mowers. 

Consider what goes on under 
the housing. With a motor turning 
up at 3600 revolutions per 
minute, each blade tip of a 
20-inch mower is making more 
thant 60 revolutions per second. 
Thus a hand or foot could be 
slashed 120 times in one second. 
Actually, amputation can occur in 
1/1 20th of a second - the very 
first pass of the blade. 

Unfortunately, children are 
often the victims. Twenty to 
thirty percent of mower victims 
are children under the age of 13. 



Children don't have to suffer 
these accidents. They should be 
kept out of the area when the 
mower is being operated and 
immature children should be 
refused permission to operate 
them under any circumstances. 



This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY. 
406 Hancock SI., No. Quincy 

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: 

( barge Accounts 

Delivery Service 

Insurance Receipts 

Free Gift Wrapping 

Ostomy Supplies 

Tax Records on Request 

Utility Payments Mon. Thru Sat 9 

to 5 

Phone: 328-3426 



Page IS Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 



Arts/Entertainment 



Scholarships, Awards Presented 
At Art Association Festival 



Three Quincy students, Ann 
Rice, Loretta Garrigan and Greta 
Gougian, were presented scholar- 
ships at the Quincy Art Associa- 
tion's Fifth Annual Arts Festival 
held recently at the Quincy 
Historical Society. 

Miss Rice, from Quincy High 
School, and Miss Garrigan, from 
North Quincy High School, each 
received $300 scholarships. 

The presentations were made 
by Marcia Oster. 

Miss Gougian received the F. 
E. Bergfors Art Scholarship of 
$1,000. Presenting this award 
was Constance Bergfors Rice, a 
Quincy born artist now living in 
Maryland, who was a special 
guest for the evening. 

Popular prize winner was 
Stephen Pecevich of Boston 
College High School. 

The president's award went to 
Jennifer Dela Paz of Quincy High 
School. 



Other award winners were: 

Grade 9: First - Rajat Rav 
N.Q.H.S.; Second - Jennifer 
Wilson, Fontbonne; Third 
Robert Climo, N.Q.H.S.; Hon. - 
Carrie Hallet, BM J.H.S.; Hon. - 
Paul Lloyd, N.Q.H.S. 

Grade 10: First - David Rooney, 
N.Q.H.S.; Second - Marcia 
Kelley, Q.H.S.; Third - Maria 
Paz, N.Q.H.S.; Hon. - Karen 
Fragose, N.Q.H.S.; Hon. - Teresa 
Mills, Vo-Tech. 

Grade 11: First - Chris 
Pearsons, Q.H.S.; Second 
Stephen Pecevich, B.C.H.S.; 
Third - Cheryl Fraser, Arch. 
Williams; Hon. - Mark Miceli, 
N.Q.H.S.; Hon. - Tracy Aiguir, 
Q.H.S. 

Grade 12: First - Albie Nogler, 
N.Q.H.S.; Second - David Riley, 
N.Q.H.S.; Third - Kathleen 
Latus. Fontbonne; Hon. - David 
Riley, N.Q.H.S.; Hon. - Lorrie 
Peterson, N.Q.H.S. 

Photography: First - John 




Camp \J/ 
' Thayer 



An Outdoor Camp for Boys and Girls 4-13 

Second Session: Four Weeks 

July 27 - August 21, 1981 46th Session 

745 Washington Street, Braintree 

Under the direction of Thayer Academy and located on 
its campus, Camp Thayer features swimming instruction 
using an Olympic sized pool, drama, tennis, archery 
arts and crafts, sailing, boating, water skiing. Call or 
write for a catalog. Phone 843-3580. 



JASON'S 

1514 HANCOCK ST, QUINCY SAVE ON IilLUKUo 

TAPES-LUGGAGE 

SHEET MUSIC 

LEATHER GOODS & MORE 





Dinner Specials from $ 3.50 

Daily 3:00-9:00 

Chinese Polynesian Food 

* New Additional Luncheon 
Specials 11:30 to 3 P.M. 

* Dinner Specials 3 P.M. to 9 P.M. 

* Banquet Facilities 

* Cocktail Lounge 




TAKE OUT ORDERS 



ST CALL AHEAD FOR 

* • FAST SERVICE ""^ 

Banquet Facilities Available 



105 Sea St., Quincy 

TAKE OUT ORDERS 
V 471-2255 



DeMasi, N.Q.H.S.; Second - John 
Pickering, Q.H.S.; Third - Janice 
Porter, N.Q.H.S.; Hon. - Anne 
McElaney, N.Q.H.S.; Hon. - Ted 
Duggan, N.Q.H.S. 

Crafts: First - Susan Murray, 
Q.H.S.; Second - Kathleen 
Donovan, Q.H.S. ; Third - Finley 
Mullally, Q.H.S.; Hon. - 
Stephanie Petz, Q.H.S.; Hon. - 
Margaret Cullen, B.M.J.H.S. 

Festival Committee Members 
were: Marcia Oster, president; 
Anet Paglierani, festival chair- 
man; Kay Hansen, exhibit chair- 
man; Louise Swindells, Joanne 
Dondero, publicity; Peg Hartford, 
refreshments; Helen Burgess, 
Judy Craven, Bob Dano, Kathy 
Burgess, Dorothy Wallace, 
children's workshop. 

Committee Aides were: Cathy 
Anderson, Carol Cahill, Pearl 
Finn, Lena Gullins, Jane 
Madden, Cynthia McCloskey, 
Dorothy Merrill, Anne Muir, 
Laura Olson, Elsa Ross, Betty 
Sawyer, Edna Solander. 

Courtney Mann 
In 'America 9 
Re-enactment 

Courtney Mann, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mann of 
Quincy, was a member of the 
Park St. Church Children's Choir, 
that reenacted the first singing of 
the national hymn, "America", 
on the steps of the Boston church 
July 5. 

The song, which was written by 
Samuel F. Smith, was first 
performed by a group of children 
from the Park St. Church on 
Boston Common on the Fourth of 
July in 1831. 




agEnzEn 



Featuring 
the Finest In 
\ew England 

(ooking 

LUNCHEON 
I! A.M. to 4 P.M. 

DINNER 
4 P.M. to 10 P.M. 






ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

Bowling Banquets 

Retirement Parties Showers 

Weddings & Anniversaries 



Entertainment 

Nightly at the 

Fireside Lounge 



FOR RESERVATIONS 
Call 471 1823, 471 5540 





THE COMPANY THEATRE will present "Andy Hardy!" July 10, II 
and 12, at 8 p.m. at First Congregational Church of Weymouth. Michael 
Costa of Squantum, a junior at North Quincy High School, will play the 
title role; Beth Capodanno of Weymouth will also star in the show. 



Michael Costa To Star 
In p Andy Hardy' 



Michael Costa of Squantum will 
star in the title role of The 
Company Theatre's production of 
"Andy Hardy!" July 10, 11 and 
12, at 8 p.m. at First Congre- 
gational Church of Weymouth. 

Tickets will be available at the 
door. 

Other local residents taking 
part in the production are Zoe 
Bradford and Jordie Saucerman 
of Houghs Neck, directors of the 
theatre which they founded in 
1978 to provide semi-professional 
theatre for South Shore youths 
ages 13 to 20. 

The production is a nostalgic 



theatrical revival of the MGM 
Mickey Rooney - Judy Garland 
musicals which broke box-office 
records during a time of economic 
depression. 

It follows the adventures of 
Andy Hardy, a high spirited ail- 
American adolescent who decides 
to "put on a show" to help out 
with family finances. 

The show is complete with tap 
dancing, chorus lines, and 
popular numbers such as 
"Lullaby of Broadway", 
"Waiting for the Robert E. Lee", 
"Steppin' Out with my Baby", 
and "Babes on Broadway". 



2 Residents Attend 
Aquarium Whale Watch 



Eugene Richards of Wollaston 
and Robin McCluskey of Quincy 
recently attended a New England 
Aquarium whale watch, a 
conservation meeting of the 



BRA-WEY ~§J 
FLORIST »#, 

94 Washington Si ** 
Weymouth 
3370288 3370289 



Cotton Tufts Society, Children of 
the American Revolution. 

The Cotton Tufts Society covers 
the southeastern Massachusetts 
area of the Children of the 
American Revolution, the oldest 
patriotic youth organization in the 
nation. 

Membership is open to anyone 
who is under the age of 21 and 
who is descended from a person 
who rendered aid to the cause of 
American independence. 



* * 



LAS VEGAS NIGHT 

Saturday, July 11, 1981 
7 P.M. to Midnight 

Sponsored by 

Quincy Lodge 1295 
Sons of Italy in America 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 
REFRESHMENTS DONATION $1.00 




Crane Library 

Offering Summer 

Children's Programs 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 19 



The Thomas Crane Public 
Library invites children to "Step 
In the Read Direction" and 
participate in its summer 
programs which begin the week 
of July 6. 

Programs will be geared to two 
age groups: ages four to seven, 
and eight to 12. There will be 
films, stories, book talks and 
other activities. 

The Central Library, Quincy 
Square, will begin its programs 
for younger children Tuesday, 
July 7, at 10:30 a.m. and 
Thursday, July 9, at 10:30 a.m. 
for older children. 

Programs at the North Quincy 
Branch Library begin Wednes- 
day, July 8, at 10:30 a.m. for 
younger children, and Friday, 
July 10, at 10:30 a.m. for older 
children. 

The Wollaston Branch Library 
begins its programs for younger 
children Tuesday, July 7, at 10:30 



a.m. There is no older children's 
program. 

Complete program schedules 
and summer reading lists are 
available at all library units. 



Some of the films scheduled to 
be screened for older children 
are: "Rookie of the Year"; 
"Hunted in Holland"; "The 
Amazing Cosmic Awareness of 
Duffy Moon"; and "Braverman's 
Condensed Cream of Beatles". 
Younger children will be treated 
to old favorites like: "Where the 
Wild Things Are"; "I Know an 
Old Lady"; and "The Three 
Gifts". Other engaging, less 
familiar films for young children 
are: "Toccata for Toy Trains"; 
"Toolbox Ballet"; and "Treasure 
in the Pyramids". Films are 
provided through the Eastern 
Massachusetts Regional Library 
System, and all film programs are 
subject to change. 




RECIPIENTS OF $500 SCHOLARSHIPS from Quincy Savings Bank and Quincy Symphony are recent 
graduates Errol C. DiBona, Quincy High School; Deirdre A. Neal, North Quincy High School; and Mark F. 
Griffin, Quincy Vocational Technical. All will attend Berklee College of Music in the fall. Presenting the 
sixth annual music scholarship checks is William B. Parker, assistant vice president of Quincy Savings Bank. 
At right is Anthony C. Ferrante, coordinator of music education for the Quincy Public Schools. 



Celebrity Dunk At Houghs Neck 



Members of the Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church pJan to 
raise money in an unusual way 
this week. 

They will be dunking 
celebrities. 

Three celebrities have already 
signed up for the dunking, Ed 
Baccari, principal of the Atherton 
Hough School; Jack Nigro, 
president of the Houghs Neck 



Community Council; and Sandy 
Rounseville, also known as 
"Comfortman", proprietor of 
Beacon Fabrics. 

The celebrities will man the 
dunking booth set up at 
LaBrecque Field, Sea and Darrow 
Sts. and for 50 cents people can 
throw three baseballs in an 
attempt to dunk them in the 
water. 



booth 
p.m.; 



Baccari will be in the 
from 2 p.m. to 3 
Rounseville from 7 p.m. to 9 
p.m.; and Nigro at 9:30 p.m., all 
tomorrow (Friday). 

The fund-raiser will continue 
today (Thursday) through 
Saturday from 1 p.m. to 10 p.m. 
with the proceeds going to the 
church's general fund. 




Cerebral Palsy Outing July 12 



Over 300 cerebral palsied 
children and adults, and 
members of their families, will 
attend the 22nd annual summer 
outing at the South Shore Plaza 
Twin Drive In Theatre, Braintree, 
Sunday, July 12 at 12 noon. 

The event is sponsored by the 
Quincy Lodge of Elks headed by 
Exalted Ruler David Montani, 
and Michael A. Sances, chairman 
of the Elks Cerebral Palsy 
Committee and member of the CP 
Board of Directors. 

This year's outing will be 
dedicated to the late George C. 
Fay, past chairman of the event 
and member of the Quincy Elks 
and the Board of Directors of 
Cerebral Palsy of the South Shore 
Area, Inc. For many years Mr. 
Fay was the primary force behind 
the outing. 



Entertainment will include 
singing, professional acts, clowns 
and rides on the theater's 
amusements. Refreshments will 
be hot dogs, hamburgers, tonic, 
milk, candy, watermelon, 
cookies, potato chips, popcorn, 
and ice cream served at noon as 
the guests arrive. 

Arthur Ciampa, Executive 



Director, Thomas Zukauskas, 
Associate Director, and William 
J. Trifone, President of Cerebral 
Palsy of the South Shore Area, 
Inc., and other members of the 
board of directors will represent 
the organization at the outing. 

Any CP children or adults and 
their families who live in the 
South Shore Area are invited to 
attend the picnic. 



* 
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60 DEVONSHIRE STREET 

Boston 



* 
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(One block from The Quincy Market ,4* 

Featuring the finest 
in entertainment 

r»«MBM£p. 

8EM.UL 1 *&■ 



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Truly 



t5ssatTjJ£ y € 



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Fresh Fish Picked Up Daily From The Boston Fish Pier 
Also Tasty Fried Food To Go 

BURKE'S SEAFOOD 

Quality Fresh Fish 



S^SSS? OLDIES SHO 



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Play" 1 ^ 



Your Favo 



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Requests 



from 



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Every Saturday 




14 BealeSt. 



7734600 



Wed. &Thurs. July8&9 

SEAN CONNERY IN 

"OUTLAND" ( R) 

The Summer Sleeper 
Eve's 7:00 Only 



Starts Fri July 10 

One Of The Year's Best 
Winner 10 Australian Awards 

"Breaker Morant" (PG) 

Fri & Sat 7.00 & 9:15 

Sun-Thurs 7:00 Only 

Mon & Tues Dollar Night 



SEATS $1.50 MAT'S $1.25 



SPECIALS THIS WEEK 

Fresh Lobster Meat $10.95 lb. 
Fresh Bay Scallops $4.49 lb. 
Fried Clam Plate $3.25 

includes Clams, Fr. Fries 



TOUCH OF SILK 



HOMEMADE FISH & CLAM CHOWDERS 
Don't forget our Family Nite Special 

Every Tues. and Wed. Evening only$6.95 

HOURS: Tues.-Wed. 10-6, Thurs.-Fri. 10-7, Sat. 10-5 
61 BILLINGS ROAD, NORTH QUINCY 328-9765 



", Your Favorite Dance M««.c 

SERVING 

The Finest Luncheon and 
Dinner Specials 'til 9 P.M. 

PROPER DRESS REQUIRED 



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Introducing: 

Special Bacon Burger 

Try Our Quarter Pound Hamburger With Bacon, 

Cheese, Grilled Onions, Lettuce, 

Tomato & Special Dressing on a Bulkie Roll! 

Use this coupon to get a 
FREE 16 oz. soft drink and 
FREE french fries when you 
buy the Special Bacon 
Burger at the regular 
$1.85 price. 

Good at 

520 Southern Artery, Quincy, Mass. 

191 Newport Ave., Quincy, Mass. 

'Net weight before cooking. Not valid with any 
other offer or discount. Please present coupon when ordering. 

Expiration Date July 31, 1981 




Introducing: 

Special Bacon Burger 

Try Our Quarter Pound Hamburger with Bacon, 

Cheese, Grilled Onions, Lettuce, 

Tomato & Special Dressing on a Bulkie Roll! 

Use this coupon to get a 
FREE 16 oz. soft drink and 
FREE french fries when you 
buy the Special Bacon 
Burger at the regular 
$1.85 price. 



fc«*@ 



i;'t a; 



Good at 

520 Southern Artery, Quincy, Mass. 

191 Newport Ave., Quincy, Mas*. 

'Net weight before cooking. Not valid with any 
other offer or discount. Please present coupon when ordering. 

Expiration Date July 31, 1981 



I'ii Re 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 




Special Features 



Grul>l>y 








"\ 


KahuA 

TRY 
i IT... J 


AH HURLS \ 
MAHSELF \ 
INTA TH'A/R j 
'N' ZO0H6...J 




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By Warren Sattler 



1 









•5 




RURAL DELIVERY 

r THE BEAUTIFUL 
COUNTRY WITH 
BABBLING BROOKS ^ WHAT YOU 

WROTE.' /' 



THERE WAS A VOUN6 LADY FROM LYNN 
\MHO WAS VERY VERY THIN - 
WHEN SHE SAT IN THE SHADE 
AND DRANK LEMONADE 
SHE SLIPPED THROU6H 
STRAW AND FELL IN.' 




By AL SMITH 

WAIT, HERE'S ANOTHER'- ™ 

THERE WAS A YOUN6LADY FROM NIGER 

WHO SMILED AS SHE RODE ON ATlfiER. 

THEV CAME BACK FROMTHE RIDE 

WITH THE LADY INSIDE 
AND THE SMILE ONTHE FACE 
^-^ OF THE TIGER - 




NAPOLEON 



By McBride and Moore 



NOTHIN6- GOES BETTER 
WITH BKEAKFAST THAN 
TH' AAOBNIN& PAPEK / 




TWITCH 



How Rands 




Ml&SBD BBIN& 
PRBSJDBNTOF 7H£ US. 

BYONeeLecfORMVo, 

TUB MAJORITY OF 7^f 
POPULAR VOTBf 




Unmix the letters in the boxes to form a 
word. Then circle A, B or C for the cor- 
rect meaning (or definition). 
Score yourself as follows: 
4 Correct-Excellent 2 Correct-Fair 
3 Correct-Good 1-0 Correct-Poor 



By D.J. Coales 




L 


1 


F 


















A BEHD © OUTWIT C SPELL 

CLUE i You have to be clever to do this 

2. 



T 


l|M 


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1 j 







A. EXPOSE 8 TRANSMIT C RECORD 

CLUEi A radio does - so does T.V. 



3. 



R 





L 


F 


A 

















A PLANTS 8 BIRDS C SUN 

CLUEi A Spring and Summer display 



4. 



p 


R 


E 


S 


A 


E 



















A. COCKTAIL B HAT C SHAWL. 

CLUEi Mexican colorful cover 



^: 



o-3d»ws ■> v-wou - t a-iiwa 'Z b-iioj # i :u»»w*j 



STARSCOPE 



Gare A us well 




WEEK OF: JULY 9 

AQUARIUS - January 21 -February 19 

Variety is the week's keyword. Experiment with ideas and think about 
new areas of interest to pursue An acquaintance may surprise you 
with an unusual confession. 

PISCES - February 20 March 20 

Week favors travel; be sure to pack a little gift In love and friendship, 
trust is essential And in money matters, don't leave a thing to chance 

ARIES - March 21 -April 20 

There are no short cuts this week, as you soon discover You may be 
deciding that an acquaintanceship has run its course Meanwhile, a 
happy new friendship is waiting in the wings. 

TAURUS - April 21 -May 22 

Good week to launch projects, especially those related to real estate 
or advertising. Last-minute invitations are promising. Loved one may 
be secretive, but don't pry. 

GEMINI - May 23- June 21 

Bring along a conservative friend if shopping for antiques or other fur- 
nishings. Profits can increase now, but only if you pay attention to 
trends in the marketplace. 

CANCER - June 22 July 22 

Expect the unexpected during this busy week This is a good time for 
burying hatchets, initiating activity of almost any sort, and acquiring 
works of art. 

LEO - July 23 August 22 

A good week to sharpen rusty skills and renew contacts In personal 
relationships, it's up to you to make the first moves. Promptly 
recognize loved one's achievements. 

VIRGO - August 23 September 22 

Campaigning for support of an idea takes more time than expected, 
but is worth the effort. Loved one's constant attentions may become 
too constant for your comfort 

LIBRA - September 23 October 22 

The week finds you involved in long-distance communications, in- 
coming or outgoing. Friend may not convince you of his new-found 
independence. Loved one finally supports your latest scheme. 

SCORPIO - October 23 -November 21 

This is not the week to follow the leader Let loved ones share the 
limelight with you. Don't hesitate to question advisers, no matter how 
high their rank 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22 December 22 

A small feud can snowball into a large battle, so make peace early on. 
Partner may be preoccupied with a problem that needs to be solved 
on his/her own. 

CAPRICORN - December 23 January 20 

Select quality over quantity, though it may be tempting to choose the 
latter A recent opponent becomes a loyal ally. Healthwise, don't 
postpone checkups — your own, or your loved ones'. 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

You are sometimes shy and indirect, and you prefer tiny gatherings to 
big parties Up-in-the-air plans settle to earth by October Education is 
accented over the next eight months; a major academic event may 
take place in the fall. 

BORN THIS WEEK 

July 9th, actor Richard Roundtree; 10th, actor James Brolin; 11th, 
actor Tab Hunter; 12th, actor Milton Berle, 13th, host Dave Gar 
roway; 14th, actress Polly Bergen; 15th, singer Linda Rondstadt. 



Crossword 



4. 

8. 

11. 



ACROSS 

Entire 
Region 
Doiry animal 
Hawaiian 



aarland 
irl's toy 



13. 
14. 
16. 
18. 
20. 

22. 
25. 

26. 
27 
28. 

30. 



Fruit drink 

Bird of prey 

Kind of weasel 

Disadvantage 

Landed 

proprietor 

Foundation 

Man's 

nickname 

Prefix, two 

More talented 

Remained 

standing 

Hezekiah's 

mother 



31. 
32. 
33. 
35. 
37. 
39. 

42. 

43. 

45. 
46. 
47. 
48 



Sun God 

Soft drink 

Breed of dog 

Vivid 

Sewing tool 

Religious 

images 

Possessive 

pronoun 

Farm 

building 

Born 

Hit a ball 

Sand expanses 

Be indebted 

DOWN 

Malt drink 
Meadow 
Not heavy 
Glandular 




' * 3 1 W s * 7 1 B* ' '° 

" 1" _ 1" 

i* is Mil, a 


tO 2/ | Mil B 70 
■ ?» ■27 

y- fL_ 


■ M 34 ■ 
97 M Mil 

hi Jv; ™ m K ' 



7-i-Sl Solution 

5. International 
language 

6. Fairylike 

7. Fish sauce 
Wrist bone 
Poem 
Moist 
Port 

Old Hebrew 
language 
Act 
Go by 
Female 



8 

9 

10. 
15. 
17. 

19. 
20. 
21. 

singing voice 

23. Withered 

24. Epochal 
27. Subsiding 

29. Most rare 

30. Brazil tree 

33. Daub 

34. Image, comb 
form 

36. Brain white 
matter 

37. Penpoint 
38 Greek letter 

40. Fresh 

41. Look at 

44. Note of scale 



Business/Real Estate 




<,K()I \I)HKI \KIMi'.' No. Building breaking. I nwanted wing of the future home of the Quinc> 
C ((operative Bank, 85 Quincy Ave., falls before the bulldozer. Left to right, Joseph A. Donahue, architect; 
John J. Sullivan, bank director; John K. Herbert, bank director; William P. Smith of (lark and Smith, 
contractors; Robert K. Keddy, Jr., bank vice president; Forrest I. Meal Jr., bank director. 

fSunan While Pholo) 



Charles Pearce Re-elected 
To CSBS Advisory Council 



Charles A. Pearce, president 
Quincy Savings Bank, has been 
elected to a second two-year term 
representing District One on the 
Advisory Council of the Confer- 
ence of State Bank Supervisors. 

His election was announced at 
the organization's recent 80th 
annual convention at the Galleria 
Plaza Hotel in Houston, Texas. 

The Advisory Council is the 
leadership group of the 
Conference's associate member 
banks and advises the parent 
organization's board of directors 
on policy matters. 

The Conference represents the 
bank commissioners of the 50 
states, Guam, Puerto Rico and 
the Virgin Islands and numbers 
approximately 6,200 state 
chartered banking institutions as 
supportive associate members. It 
is primarily concerned with 




CHARLES PEARCE 

assuring optimum performance of 
bank supervisory/examination 
functions at the state level and 
preserving a strong, independent 
state banking system. 



Elliot To Manage 
W. Quincy Office Building 



The commercial real estate firm 
of Peter Elliot & Co. has been 
named exclusive leasing and 
management agent for the new 
Quincy- West Executive Office 
Park in West Ouincv. 



The city's newest office 
building is located at 40 Willard 
St. near the Southeast Express- 
way and East Milton Square and 
will be ready for occupancy in 
September. 



Grace Carr 

Promoted By 

John Hancock 

Grace M. Carr of West Quincy 
has been promoted to unit 
supervisor in general agency 
operations at the John Hancock 
Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Mrs. Carr will be responsible 
for the supervision and 
administration of production 
records and for career develop- 
ment planning compensation for 
general agents. 

She joined Hancock in 1977 as a 
record clerk and was promoted to 
profile tape analyst in 1979 and 
section head in the contracts area 
in 1980. 

Richard Butler 
At Round Table 

Richard J. Butler of Quincy, a 
Knights of Columbus insurance 
agent, was among some 5,500 
members of the Million Dollar 
Round Table from 39 countries 
who attended the 54th annual 
meeting in New York. 

Butler, an associate with the 
Joe Imbriani Agency of Greater 
Boston, earned his invitation to 
the meeting by writing more than 
$3 million in life insurance for the 
Knights in 1980. 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 21 

Raymondi Supports 
Victim Rights Bill 

City Councillor Daniel G. assistant district attorney for 

Norfolk County, I know the pain 
and consequential suffering a 
criminal can cause a person." 

The victim service program 
would be funded through sur- 
charges placed on persons 
convicted of misdemeanors and 
other crimes. 

"I believe that this bill can be 
of special importance to our 
elderly citizens in Quincy," 
added Raymondi. 

"Senior citizens, who, unfortu- 
nately, are prime victims of 
vicious criminals, would be aided 
with services such as case 
progress notification, .financial 
compensation, family support 
services, escort services and 
other means of recovering from 
the trauma of undergoing a 
crime." 



Raymondi, candidate for mayor, 
has announced his support of a 
victim rights bill presently before 
the State Legislature. 

"A much needed step in 
putting the state on the side of 
crime victims rather than the 
criminals," he called it. 

The bill filed by State Senator 
Sam Rotundi would inform 
victims of the disposition of the 
case, see that stolen property is 
returned as soon as possible and 
advise victims of any other rights. 

Speaking at a coffee party in 
the home of Paula Arcadipane, 24 
Whiton Ave., Raymondi said: 

"For too long the rights of 
criminals have taken precedence 
over the rights of those who have 
been harmed. As a former 



McCauley Assails City's 
Labor Relations Record 



City Councillor Francis X. 
McCauley has denounced as 
"dismal" the present administra- 
tion's labor relations record in 
dealing with city employees. 

"The failure to comply with 
state laws governing collective 
bargaining may cost Quincy tax- 
payers hundreds of thousands of 
dollars in the coming years," he 
said. 

McCauley outlined his 
experience with collective bar- 
gaining and labor relations in a 
recent meeting with union 
officials. 

He noted that, as a member of 
the Quincy Housing Authority, he 
helped to set up the secretaries 
and clerical employees' union, 



and, as a member of the School 
Committee, he served on the 
negotiating team for five years. 

"Contracts with city employee 
unions must take into 
consideration employee needs as 
well as the taxpayers' ability to 
pay," he said. 

"Once a contract is signed, 
both the city and the union must 
be prepared to live up to the 
terms of the contract. " 



NEWSCARRIERS WANTED 

Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun Home delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



William Kiniry Joins Quinoil 

William G. Kiniry, formerly joined Quinoil Industries Inc., of 
area manager with Texaco, has Quincy, 

manager. 



QUINCY CITY HOSPITAL 
is looking for: 

ON-CALL 
TELEPHONE OPERATORS 

ALL SHIFTS 

Experience in operating PBX Cord 
Switchboard to relay incoming and 
outgoing calls is required. 

If interested contact the 

Personnel Department 

Quincy City Hospital 

773-6100 ext 406. 



as general sales 



Smith-Corona® 
Coronet® 

Super 12 



$239 



00 




We service what we sell. 



QUINCY 

Typewriter Service 

5 Maple St., Quincy Sq. 472-3656 



APPLICATION RE-OPENING 

PUBLIC INVITATION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR THE SECTION 

8 HOUSING ASSISTANCE PROGRAM ADMINISTERED BY THE 

QUINCY HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development and the Quincy Housing Authority have joined forces and are 
currently assisting elderly, lower income and very low income families in making rent payments. This program has 
provided individuals and families rent assistance while leaving the choice of apartments up to them. 

APPLICATION WILL BE RE-OPENING FOR ONE DAY ONLY, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 1981 BETWEEN 9 A.M. 
AND 4 P.M. ALL APPLICANTS WILL BE PLACED ON THE QUINCY HOUSING AUTHORITY SECTION 8 WAITING LIST FOR 
POSSIBLE SELECTION AT A LATER DATE. 

The Quincy Housing Authority administers this program without regard to race, color, creed, national origin or 
marital status and according to the priorities established by the Authority. Those wishing to participate must make 
application for this specific Section 8 Assistance, but will not lose their place on any public housing waiting list they 
may currently be listed on. 

IF YOU ARE A 

FAMILY OF: 12 3 4 5 6 7 8* 

AND YOUR GROSS 

FAMILY INCOME 

IS LESS THAN: $12,200 $13,959 $15,700 $17,450 $18,550 $19,600 $20,700 $21,800 

YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE 



fOUM MUSINC 
OPPORTUWrf 



Application reopening will begin on Wednesday, July 15th at 9 am. and close on Wednesday, 
July 15th at 4 p.m. at Quincy Housing Authority, 80 Clay St., Wolktston, Ma. Phone # 471- 
7050. 




Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 



Less Hostility 
To Connector 



(('.mi l')l from Panv I) 

"However, I'd like to know a 
little more about the whole plan 
before I comment on it." 

"The consensus has to be that it 
will be an economic boost to 
Quincy," said Mayor Arthur H. 
Tobin. "We have several major 
office developments that are 
contingent on the connector. 

"Here we have a major 
intersection of Route 3 and 128 
opening up to downtown Quincy 
by way of the Burgin Parkway 
Extension and there is no way to 
get to the downtown business 
district from it. 

"This will allow traffic to go left 
and right into the business area." 

Meanwhile, said Reisberg, 
downtown businessmen have 
raised a number of questions about 
the project, the most important of 
which are these: 

• Is there guaranteed funding 
for the project? 

"What happens if they get 
halfway through the construction 
and they run out of money?" said 
Reisberg. "They will have to satisfy 
me and the association that the 
funding is there." 

• How are they going to keep 
Hancock St. open during the 
period of construction? 

"The first plan for the connector 
closed Hancock St.," said 
Reisberg. "They say the new one 
will keep it open. It's hard to 
believe but they say it can be done. 

"If Hancock St. were closed it 



would cripple every business in 
downtown Quincy." 

Reisberg said that he and several 
other merchants saw a model of 
the new plan a couple of weeks ago 
"it looks much better than any 
plans we've seen before." 

"We were satisfied somewhat," 
he said, "but not really enough to 
go along with the project. As of 
now the QCBPA does not take a 
stand on it. It depends on how they 
answer our questions (Tuesday 
night)." 

Many of the downtown 
merchants said they preferred to 
listen to an explanation of the new 
route before commenting on it. 

"I saw the outline of the plan," 
said William Kelley, president of 
the Hancock Bank, "but I haven't 
seen any detail. I have a lot of 
questions to ask about it. 

"How will it be financed? Is it 
solid enough to build over at the 
old Sears building? How do they 
plan to keep Hancock St. open? 
How will the road intersect with 
Parkingway and the service road? 

"I'd like to hear the answers 
before I make any comment on the 
plan." 

"I'd like to take a close look at it 
before I say anything," said Burt 
Cook of Tag's. 

"I'd like to see the particulars 
before I make any comment," said 
Bob Colman of Colman's Sporting 
Goods. "We need answers this 
time. What we don't need is 
another selling job. No one has 
shown us any facts yet." 



Anthony Pellegrino New Physician 

Anthony A. Pellegrino of 
Quincy was one of 101 new 
physicians graduated from the 
Univer sity of Massachusetts 



Medical Center in Worcester, the 
eighth class to be graduated from 
the school. 



NOTICE 




1372 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY SQ. 

Office 
Will Be Closed On Saturdays 

During July and August. 

Newscarriers Should Pay Their 

Bills Monday thru Friday. 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

QUINCY CITY HALL 

1305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering to the City of 
Quincy : 



School Dept. 



Water Dept. 
Purchasing Dept. 



Groceries and Frozen July 27, 1981 at 10:00 A. M. 

Foods 
Paper & Packaging July 27, 1981 at 10:30 A. M. 

Products 
Dishwashing Machine July 27, 1981 at 11:00 A. M. 

Supplies, Equipment 

and Maintenance 
Graphic Art Supplies July 27, 1981 at 11:30 A. M. 

Trucks (2 Pickup, 1 Dump) July 28, 1981 at 10:00 A. M. 
Bank Gravel July 28, 1981 at 10:30 A. M. 

Bulk Snow & Ice Removal July 28, 1 981 at 1 1 :00 A. M. 
Rock Salt 

Tires July 29, 1981 at 10:00 A. M. 

Office Supplies July 29, 1981 at 10:30 A. M. 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing Agent, 
Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration and will be received at the 
office of the Purchasing Agent until the time and date stated above, at which 
time and date they will be publicly opened and read. 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the sealed envelope is to 
be clearly marked, "BID ENCLOSED" with time/date of bid call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept any part of a bid 
or the one deemed best for the City. 

Arthur H. Tobin, Mayor 
William J. Kelly, Purchasing Agent 
7/9/81 



HEAD START PROGRAM 



Head Teacher 



$137.50/wk 



36 wks 25 hrs/wk 

Must meet O.F.C. requirements 
34 wks 14 hrs/wk 

32 wks 25 hrs/wk 

31 wks 25 hrs/wk 

The above positions are located in Quincy, Braintree, and Weymouth. 
Additional information may be obtained by calling the Head Start office at 471-3350. 
Applicants should forward resumes to Head Start Director, 1495 Hancock St. (rear), 4th floor, 
Quincy, Mass., 02169. Closing date is July 15, 1981. We are an equal opportunity employer 



Classroom Aide 
Bus Driver 
Bus Aide 



$ 52.50/wk 
$131.25/wk 
$ 93.75/wk 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81F1864E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES BROWNLIE late of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that SOUTH SHORE BANK of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executor named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/19/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Ninth day of July in the 
Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/9-16-23/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81F1640A1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOSEPH E. GATELY late 
of Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. NOTICE 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter praying 
that MARIE C. GATELY of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Administratrix without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 7/29/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of saio Court at 
Dedham, the ninth day of June in the 
Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
6/25 7/2-9/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81F1816E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CALOGERO GAZIANO 
also known as CHARLES GAZIANO 
late of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that ANTHONY M. GAZIANO of 
Medford in the County of Middlesex 
be appointed Executor named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
foTenoonon 8/12/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, first Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-ninth day of 
June in the Year of our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty -one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/9-16-23/81 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 77M0906-D2 

SHERRI A. CONNELLY Plaintiff 
vs. PAUL W. CONNELLY 
Defendant. Summons by Publication. 

To the above-named Defendant: 

A complaint has been presented to 
this Court by your spouse, Sherri A. 
Connelly, seeking to dissolve the 
bonds of matrimony, for alimony 
and for custody of and allowance for 
minor children. 

You are required to serve upon 
Thomas M. Barron, plaintiffs! 
attorney, whose address is 1372 
Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
your answer on or before August 5, 
1981. If you fail to do so, the Court 
will proceed to the hearing and 
adjudication of this action. You arc 
also required to file a copy of your 
answer in the office of the Register 
of this Court at Dedham. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esq., First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham June 19, 1981. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81 FT 721 El 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOHN S. MALMGREN late 
of Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will and codicil of said 
deceased praying that VERA E. 
MALMGREN of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
Executrix named in the will without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/5/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Eighteenth day of June 
in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty -one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81F1725E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of WINIFRED K. RUSSELL 
late of Quincy, in the County of 
Norfolk. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that RONALD T. RUSSELL of Old 
Orchard Beach, Maine, be appointed 
Executor named in the will without 
sureties or. the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
in or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/5/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, first Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Eighteenth day of June 
in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
6/25 7/2-9/81 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 84F1783E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GEORGE D. DALTON late 
of Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that MARY E. DALTON of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executrix named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/12/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-fifth day of 
June in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81M0826-D2 

LANA KING Plaintiff vs. 
WILLIAM KING Defendant. 
Summons by Publication. 

To the above-named Defendant: 

A complaint has been presented to 
this Court by your spouse, Lana 
King, seeking a divorce for cruel and 
abusive treatment, custody of minor 
child, support. 

You are required to serve upon 
Nancy Lorenz, Greater Boston Legal 
Services, plaintiffs attorney, whose 
address is 85 Devonshire Street, 
Boston, MA 02109, your answer on 
or before 16th day of September, 
1981. If you fail to do so, the Court 
will proceed to the hearing and 
adjudication of this action. You are 
also required to file a copy of your 
answer in the office of the Register 
of this Court at Dedham. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esq., First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, June 16, 1981. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
6/25 7/2-9/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81IT664E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GEORGE D. DAVIDSON 
late of Quincy, in the County of 
Norfolk. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that ELLA R. DAVIDSON of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executrix named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 7/29/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Fifteenth day of June 
in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 23 



S^CLflSSIFIEDflDS! 



HELP WANTED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



Ambitious People 

Do you have management or 
leaching skills? Are you tired of 
working for someone else? Are you 
interested in health and nutrition? 
Would you like an opportunity to 
be finanically secure working part- 
time? If so call -696-1713. 

7 9 

Part Time 

Earn $5-10 hourly servicing our 
customers from home on your 
telephone. 924-7450. 

7 30 

FOR SALE 

Waterbeds 

New Queen or King Size Waterbed, 
never opened, 10 year waranty, 
walnut stained pine frame, 
headboard, deck, pedestal, 
mattress, liner, heater. Originally 
$330.00, now $199.00. 828-1662, 
Canton. 

8 20 

Dutchmaid 

Quality clothing for the entire 
family. 10% off all underwear 
orders. For the month of July only. 
Party plan or individual orders. 
Call Clemie Brill 479-6538. 

7/30 

PERSONALS 

l() SI II 1)1. () Hoi) Si .luik. ApuMlc and 
Muriw. great in virtue and rich in miracles, 
near kinsman ol Jesus Christ, taithlul 
miercessor nl all who invoke youi special 
patronage in lime of need. 10 you I ha\c 
recourse from Ihc depths ol m\ heart and 
ruimhl\ beg to whom God hw» given such great 
power, to come to nn assistance, help me in rm 
present and urgent petition In return. I promise 
lo make vour name known and cause you to be 
invoked. sa\ 1 Our hathers. 1 Hail Marys and 
Glorias. Publication must he promised. St. 
.lude pray for us and all who invoke your aid. 
\men this Vnena has never been known to 
tail I have had my request granted (This 
Novcna should be said on 9 consecutive days). 
Publication promised 

H.H. 

7 <J 
TO ST JDDE, O Holy St Jude, Apostle and 
Martyr, great in virtue and rich in miracles, 
near kinsman of Jesus Christ, faithful 
intercessor of all who invoke your special 
patronage in time of need, to you 1 have 
recourse from the depths of my heart and 
humbly beg to whom God has given such great 
power, to come to my assistance, help me in my 
pi sent and urgent petition In return, I promise 
to make your name known and cause you to be 
invoked, say .1 Our Fathers, J Hail Marys and 
(ilorias. Publication must be promised. St. 
Jude pray for us and all who invoke your aid 
Amen. This Novena has never been known to 
fail. I have had my request granted. (This 
Novena should be said on 9 consecutive days). 
Publication promised. 

BR 
7,9 



"A MESSAGE 

For Jehovah's Witnesses" 

Are you a Jehovah's Witness with 
questions? We may have the 
answers for you. Call 843-1836. 
New message weekly. 

7/9 

WANTED 

American Host 
Families Wanted 

American families wanted, to room 

and board select international 

students. Screening and 

supervision guaranteed. Min. 

Length of stay 4 mos. Please reply: 

TOM CUNNIFF 

S.P.S. Language Center 

883 Boylston St. 

Boston, MA 021 16 (262-0383) 

7; 23 



Nancy's Nook 
537 Sea Street 

(2 minutes Irom Police Station) 
We are interested in selling the 
following on consignment. 
Infants, children's, teens and 
women's clothing in excellent 
condition. 

Also baby furniture and Arts & 
Crafts. Turn your articles into 
cash by bringing them in for 
consignment. 

Closed for vacation July 18th 
thru July 29th. Accepting fall 
consignments July 7th. 



JAY'S 
TREE REMOVAL 

DONE BY TRAINED 
EXPERIENCED PERSONNEL 
Free Estimates 

LOW Fully Insured 

low' 

RATES 

CALL AFTER 4 P 

843-6115 




Rainbow Painters 

Interior Exterior 

Painting Free Est. 

Old Fashioned Qualitv 

328-7266 328-6323 



FOR RENT 

Cottages For 
Rent 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore. Housekeeping 
cottages. Studio and 3- 
room available. Weekly 
rentals $165 to $200. 
Private beach. Tennis 
available. Call 328-1300, 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
r.K. 

Retail Stores 

For Rent. Retail Stores 300 feet or 
600 feet combined Billings Rd., 
North Quincy. 773-8194 Fridays 
after 6 p.m. 7 9 

MISCELLANEOUS 

5-FamiIy Yard Sale 

Saturday, July 1 1 - Corner of 
Sonoma and Essex in Squantum. 
Small appliances, baby & 
household goods, furniture, books, 
clothing, etc. 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. 7 9 

Rummage Sale 

Friday July 10, 1981 6 p.m. -9 p.m. 
Saturday July II, 1981 10 a.m. -3 
p.m. $1.00 a bag. 

St. Boniface Thrift Store 

(Behind St. Boniface Church) 

Palmer St., Quincy, Mass. 7,9 

INSTRUCTION 
Guitar Lessons 

By professional guitarist and 
teacher. All stvles, all ages. 773- 
3588. 

7 30 

Music Lessons 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 

BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER 

27 Beale St., Wollaston 

Call 773-5325 



Steve's Landscaping 
Service 

All types of lawn care services and 
related landscape planning done at 
reasonable costs. Sod work, tree 
removal, bushes trimmed and 
mulched etc. 

FREE ESTIMATES Call 328- 
3361. 79 

GLASS WORK 

Table tops - plexiglas tinted & clear. 
Mirrors installed clear and 
goldvein. Screens, storm windows 
& sashes repaired. 7 days. Call 328- 
7132 or 426-7989. Gene. 

7 >23 



Wollaston Fuel & Burner Service 



WE SERVICE 

oil burners 
oil heating systems 
gas heating systems 
all motor & controls 
all hot water problems 
air conditioning 

773-3443 

42 St. Ann's Road 



WE INSTALL 



oil burners 

oil fired boilers 

gas fired boilers 

enertrol-computor 

energy savings - vent damper 

oil burners cleaned 
President Jerry LaFlamme 
Former Serviceman of 
General Automatic Heating 



AN AUTHORIZED [NERTR0L DEALER ,„ 

All Work Guaranteed >U ' 



BOB'S ODD JOBS 

Rubbish Removal 

Hauling a Moving 

Landscaping 

Interior Eiterior Painting 

General Home Maintenance 

& Repairs 

Many other services 

Free Estimates Very Reasonable 

472-0868 Nights » Weekends 



Larry's 
Home Repair 

Interior - exterior painting, scroll 

ceilings, gutters, roof repairs, and 

property maintenance. 328-8735, 

.659-7471. 

Housepainting 

Two experienced college students 

looking for summer work painting 

houses, interior and exterior. 

Quality work at very reasonable 

rates. 

For free estimate, please call Matt. 

773-6833, eves. 7 9 

John J. Donovan 

Plumbing, Heating & 

Gas Fitting 

Specializing 
in Bathroom Remolding, gas & oil 
heating systems. Boiler & Hot 
water heater. Replacements. 
Emergency Repairs. Master Lie. # 
8617. 328-5675. 7 30 

Seamstress 

Will do alterations custom 
dressmaking. Will pickup. In 
Quincy 2 times weekly. Peg 963- 
0337 if no answer 328-6941 please 
leave name and number. 7/9 



Atlantic 

CARPET $ UPHOLSTERY CLEANING SPECIALISTS 




CARPETS and UPHOLSTERY 
CLEANED 

IN YOUR HOME/OFFICE 



• VELVETS, TAPESTRIES 

• HAITIANS, HERCULONS 

• ALL OTH€ * FABRICS 



• ORIENTALS 

• WALL to WALL CARPETS 
•PICK UP A DELIVERY 



WATER DAMAGE 

FREE ESTIMATES 

471-3142 



WALTER J. McLEAN 



Need Help With Your 
Writing? 

Call Ed Wyckoff, 479-8399 (after 6 
p.m.) Freelance editor, Harvard 
BA, $ 1 0/ h r . Satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

_ 7 9 

Hall For Hire 

Weddings, showers, meetings, 
banquets. Elks Home. 1220 
Hancock St., Quincy. 

472-2223 t.f. 



Reliable Floor Service 

Hardwood floor sanding. 
Specialists since 1962. Poly- 
Urethane. Free Est. 335-5509. 8/13 



Your South Shore 

Headquarters 

For 

Appliance 
Service 

OW ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE & APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St., So Quincy 
472-1710 T.F 




Wallpapering 

Experienced, neat, clean and 
courteous service. Call 328-6277. 

7 16 



HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a basic 
Homeowner's policy for $30,000 
and are paying more than $148 00 a 
year. Call 479-4242 at once. 
Rutstcm Insurance Agency. T.F. 



MOORE'S PAINTING 

INTERIOR -EXTERIOR 
FREE ESTJMAJES 
Hiqh Quality - Low Cost 
College Student years of experience 
Call Rory - 925-2419 after 5 p.m. 



Keys Made 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

86 Washington St., Quincy 
479-5454 



T.F. 



A&T VACUUM 

Repair Specialists On All Makes 

• FREE Pickup, 
Delivery, Estimates 

• Belts, Bags, Hoses all vacs 

• New, used, Rebuilt vacs 

• $9.95 special 
(General overhaul) 
only on carry in 
service with Ad 

• Flectrolux Bags 

(!4Pkg$4.29- 5Pkg$l,59) 
25 Beale St. Wollaston - 479-5066 
357A Wash. St. Braintree- 848-M76 
• T.F. 




Hall For Rent 

North Quincy K. of C. Building, 5 
Mollis Ave. For information please 

ca " 328-0087 



"Tunerville Trolley" 

(ONE-MAN BAND) 
Yesteryear's answer for music and 
entertainment and your extra- 
special occasions. Call 773-3588. 
7/23 



Eager Beaver 

Tree Service 

Experience At 

Low Rates 

Pruning - Cutting - Removal. Lots 
cleared. Free estimates. Serving 
South Shore area. Call Cliff at 767- 
0359. 7/l6 



Insulate Yourself 

We have a trailer of Cellulose Class 
I available. Rent blower or pour in 
place. THE DR Insulation Co., 600 
Southern Artery, Quincy, next to 
Duane's. 47I-5777 

9/30 



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INDEX FOR 
CLASSIFIED 

CHECK ONE 

D Services 
D For Sale 

□ Autos 

□ Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Help Wanted 
D Pets, Livestock 
D Lost and Found 

D Real Estate for Sale 
G Real Estate Wanted 
G Miscellaneous 

□ Work Wanted 

□ Antiques 

□ Coins and Stamps 

□ Rest Homes 

□ Instruction 




MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN, 1 372 Hancock St.. Quincy 021 69 
PAYABLE fN ADVANCE. Cash must accompany order 



E nclosed is 



for the following ad to run times 



COPY: 



$3.20 for one week, up to 20 words, 54 each additional word 
$3.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions 

of the same ad ... 54 each additonal word. 
$2.80 per week up to 20 words, for ten or more insertions 

of the same ad. 
No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of cancellation 

Deadline: Tuesday, noon 

Please include your phone number in ad. 



Single Rate: 
Contract Rates: 



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Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 



Gov. King To Sign Hospital, QJC Bills Here 



Gov. Edward J. King will visit into law bills creating revolving 
Quincy today (Thursday) to sign accounts for City Hospital and 



CHURCH'S 

Launderers Cleansers 

234 Billings Road 



July Special 



Pillows Cleaned, Fluffed, 
Deodorized, Sanitized 



Encased in Brand 
NEW TICKING 

Blankets Cleaned $4.00 



$4 



95 



: 



328-9811 



N. Quincy 



1 



I 

♦ 
♦ 



♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

4 



Quincy Junior College. 

The double signing is 
scheduled to take place at 10 a.m. 
in the City Council chamber at 
City Hall. 

The acts will enable the 
hospital and the junior college to 
support themselves on their own 
incomes independently of the city 
budget, which is limited by the 
constraints of Proposition 2 Vi . 

"This is the most creative and 
innovative response bo Prop 2Vi 
in keeping with the spirit of the 
law," said City Councillor James 
A. Sheets, who was instrumental 
in shaping the junior college 



measure. 

"It has to be quite an 
accomplishment getting these 
bills through the local govern- 
ment body and the Legislature," 
said Mayor Arthur H. Tobin, who 
started both bills on their way 
earlier this year. 

The junior college bill went 
through final passage last Thurs- 
day and the hospital bill was 
passed Monday afternoon with 
the final House vote 139-0 for 
enactment. 

"I spoke to the governor," said 
Sen. Paul D. Harold, who saw the 
bills through as Senate chairman 



TIMEX 

Factory authorized Service Center 
In and Out-of-Warranty Watches Repaired 
Genuine TIMEX Energy Cells available 

^Oq&lf Jewelers 

1402 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY 
773-3636 



r 



~\ 




It takes a solid 

bank to meet 

the challenges 

off the 80*s. 



Even though the economy during 1980 was volatile and un- 
predictable, the South Boston Savings Bank, Massachusetts' 
highest earning savings bank, continued to grow. To see our 
strength, just look at our financial summary. 



FINANCIAL SUMMARY 




October 31 (millions) 






1980 


1979 


1978 


1977 


1976 


% change 
1976-1980 


Assets 


$4592 


$436.4 


$399.0 


$365.2 


$3256 


+41.0% 


Deposits 


S421 3 


$4098 


$373 4 


$325.2 


$295.3 


+42.7% 


Mortgages and 
Mortgage-backed 
Securities S329.7 


$3153 


$262 7 


S245.6 


S199 9 


+64.9% 


Other 
Investments 


S123 1 


$1203 


$123 7 


$1129 


$118 .3 


+ 4.1% 


Capital 
Accounts 


S242 


$237 


$21 6 


$20.7 


$17.7 


+36.7% 


Operating 
Expenses 


S4.3 


$4.6 


S3 5 


$30 


$2.8 


+53.6% 


Net Income' 


$5.7 


$60 


S5.7 


$4.5 


S3. 4 


♦ 67 6% 


'Before Taxes 













In 1980, interest paid depositors rose to a new high of 
$34.5 million. Assets increased 5.2% to $459 million. 
And deposits were up to 2.8% to $421.3 million. South 
Boston Savings Bank's growth continues, thanks to our 
depositors and their expanding needs. 
Assets comprised residential and commercial mortgage 
loans in Boston, the surrounding area, and across the 
country. Plus government, municipal and corporate 
securities and money market instruments. 
These assets give the South Boston Savings Bank the 
strength to meet the ongoing challenges of the 1980s. 
The record of growth and reliability South Boston Sav- 
ings Bank started in 1863 continues with our commit- 
ment to improve service to the public in the years ahead. 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

^ "ALWAYS THE LEADER" 



kz 



Main Office: 460 West Broadway 

South Boston, Tel. 268-2500 
NEPONSET CIRCLE • QUINCY 



'J 



of the Local Affairs Committee, 
"and he said he would sign it 
Thursday." 

Michael Kitchen, director of 
City Hospital for the management 
firm of Hospital Corp. of 
America, said he was pleased that 
the legislature acted so swiftly to 
enact the bill. 

"This will be a great 
assistance to us in getting the 
hospital back on its feet," he 
said. 

Mayor Tobin noted that the 
junior college had just received 
accreditation for the first time 
from the New England Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Universities. 

"We know now that the junior 
college is not going to close its 
doors but will remain an excellent 
education institution and the only 
self-supporting municipal junior 
college in the state," he said. 

"City hospital was always a 
drain on the city treasury and the 
junior college was to a lesser 
extent. Now neither one of them 
will be a burden on the taxpayers 
of Quincy." 

Southwest Needs 

Study To 

Start Soon 

A pilot study is set to begin of 
the Southwest Quincy Neighbor- 
hood Strategy Area under the 
new Neighborhood Improvement 
Planning Program. 

The purpose of the study is to 
identify existing conditions and 
needs in the areas of housing, 
land uses, traffic, parks and 
recreation, public utilities, 
community facilities and 
neighborhood services. 

Then a program of 
recommended neighborhood 

improvement activities will be 
developed to meet the defined 
needs. 

City Councillor James A. 
Sheets and the Planning Depart- 
ment have called a meeting today 
(Thursday) at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Lincoln-Hancock School to 
introduce the study to the 
residents. 

The study is expected to be 
completed in February, 1982, at 
which time implementation of the 
recommendations will begin. 

Later, the program will be 
expanded to include all of the 
city's Community Development 
Block Grant target areas. 

July Activities 
At Houghs Neck 

Calendar of events at the 
Houghs Neck Community Center, 
1193 Sea St., for July: 

Mondays: Noon - I p.m. Manet 
Over Sixty Services (MOSS) 
group meets. 

Tuesdays: 10 a.m. - 1 1 a.m. 
Reading hour for tots age three to 
six. 

1 1 a.m. - 1 p.m.. Arts and crafts 
for children age six to 1 1. 

5:30 - 6:30 p.m. Aerobics dance 
class. 

Wednesdays: 10 a.m. - noon Free 
blood pressure clinic. 

Thursdays: 10 a.m. - II a.m. 
Reading hour for tots age three to 
six. 

1 1 a.m. - 1 p.m. Arts & crafts for 
children age six to 1 1. 

5:30 - 6:30 p.m. Aerobics dance 
class. 

7 - 10 p.m. Art class meets. 
Fridays: 9:30- I 1:30a.m. Mothers 
Co-op meets. 

7 - 10 p.m. Houghs Neck teens 
meet. 

Saturdays: 6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 
Overeaters Anonymous meeting. 

Trips to the South Shore Music 
Circus and to a Red Sox game in 
July are being planned. Write to 
Pat Ridlen at the center or call her 
at 471-8251 regarding any of the 
above. 



Historic Quincy 



A Tourist Guide 





A Special Supplement 



l 



Thursday, July 9 1981 



Page 2 A Quincy Sun Thursday. July *), 1981 



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Welcome To Historic Quincy 

Welcome to Historic Quincy, a city rich in history and tradition. 

It is difficult for residents and visitors alike to walk the streets and pathways of our city 
without feeling the spiritual presence of the great men and women of our glorious past. 

These are the same streets that once felt the tread of John and John Quincy Adams, the 
second and sixth presidents of the United States. Born in farmhouses side by side, they 
remain the only father and son to occupy the presidency. 

John Hancock walked here, too, wooing and winning the beauteous Dorothy Quincy 
in the days before he signed the Declaration of Independence in a bold hand so large that 
King George III could read it without his glasses. 

It was here that the Massachusetts Constitution — the model for the United States 
Constitution — was drafted by John Adams, his firebrand cousin Samuel, and James 
Bowdoin in the very house where John Quincy Adams was born. 

Rails for the first commercial railroad in the country were laid here to transport 
Quincy granite for the construction of the Bunker Hill Monument and the first 
ironworks operated here, modest forerunner of the great American steel industry of 
today. 

The list of Quincy people and places that played such important roles in the 
development of our country is endless . . . 

I am proud to be mayor of a city with such rich heritage and to hold the same office 
once occupied by Charles Francis Adams of that noble family line. 

Again, welcome to Historic Quincy. 

May your visit be a pleasant and inspirational one. 

Sincerely yours, 




ARTHUR H. TOBIN 

Mayor 



I'loduivd m coopei.iiinn with the Norfolk County lourisi ( ouncil and the Norfolk Counts ( o 



mmisMoiicrs 






&###### ###&#######&#^ 






Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 3A 



The Adams Cottages 



Our Only Father - Son Presidents Born Here 



It was the North Precinct of 
Braintree then, a sprawling tract of 
woods and farmlands on the gently 
rolling hills some 10 miles south of 
the Boston Stone along the winding 
Coast Road to Plymouth. 

Something less than 1,500 people 
lived in the North, Middle and 
South Precincts of Braintree in the 
year 1735 and two of them were 
Deacon John Adams, 44, farmer 
and cordwainer, and his wife, 
Susanna, 26. 

Their home was a weathered gray 
farmhouse with a high peaked roof 
and attached lean-to kitchen set on 
seven acres of farmland at roughly 
Milepost 11 of the Coast Road, just 
where it turned up the wooded 
slopes of Penn's Hill toward the 
Monatiquot River ford. 

He was a pillar of his rural 
community. Mr. Adams was, a 
deacon in the First Parish Church, a 
lieutenant in the Braintree militia 
and a town constable with a forceful 
personality and tact that enabled 
him to collect taxes from his 
neighbors. 

He was a hard-working farmer 
whose cider was acknowledged best 
in town, he worked in leather during 
the winter months, and he had an 
eye on an adjoining piece of farm- 
land, 9V2 acres owned by the 
Billings brothers, complete with a 
farmhouse similar to his own. 

Susanna Adams was a Boylston of 
Brookline, socially a cut above her 
husband, and perhaps there were 
moments in the simple house at the 
foot of Penn's Hill when she 
thought of the home of her uncle, 
the noted Dr. Zabdiel Boylston of 
Brookline, whose furniture came all 
the way from London. 

Their first child, a son who was 
named John for his father, was born 
in the southeast bedroom of the 
farmhouse on Oct. 19. 1735 (Old 
Style). He would become the second 
president of the United States. 

Deacon John purchased the 
house next door for 500 pounds in 
1744 and it was ready 20 years later 
when young John moved in with his 
brand new bride, the former Abigail 
Smith, the preacher's sparkling 
daughter from the next town of 
Weymouth. 
Their second child, a son who was 




JOHN QUINCY ADAMS Birthplace (left) and the John Adams Birthplace. 



named John Quincy Adams after his 
great grandfather, Col. John 
Quincy, was born there on July 11, 
1767. He would become the sixth 
president of the United States. 

The junction of Franklin St., 
Independence Ave., and President 
Ave. in South Quincy is the only 
place in the country where the 
birthplaces of two presidents who 
are father and son stand side by 
side in the same city. 

The precise age of the two 
cottages, now painted red, at the 
foot of Penn's Hill is not known. 

When the John Adams Birthplace 
was restored by the Daughters of 
Revolution in 1897, a brick bearing 
the date 1681 was discovered under 
the southeast corner, and the house 
was known to have been occupied 
by one Joseph Penniman in that 
year. 

And a man named Samuel 
Belcher was living in the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace as early 
as 1663, when it was little more than 
a one-room shack with fireplace. It 
was built to its present size in 1716, 
as evidenced by a date brick found 
in the new fireplace. 

According to Henry Adams, a 
grandson of President John Quincy 
Adams, no member of the family 
lived in the cottages after 1818, 



although ownership remained in the 
Adams family until 1940. 

Both houses were restored by the 
Adams Realty Trust, the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace in 1896 at 
a cost of $1,650 and the John Adams 
Birthplace a year later at an 
expense of $515.49. 

They were presented to the city of 
Quincy in 1940 and supervised by 
the Quincy Historical Society until 
they were turned over to the U.S. 
National Parks Service in 1979. 



The Adams Birthplaces at 133 
and 141 Franklin St. are 
currently being restored by the 
USNPS to the style of the early 
1800s. The John Adams 
Birthplace is closed to the public 
while rehabilitation work is going 
on. The John Quincy Adams 
Birthplace is open to the public 
but is devoid of furnishings. An 
interpretive program is given on 
the grounds free of charge, 
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. 



The Cover 



Adams Birthplaces Are 
Now 'Stone' And White 



For more than 80 years, they 
were the little red farmhouses at 
the foot of Penn's Hill. But 
research done by the new owner, 
the U.S. National Park Service, 
has changed all that. 

The USNPS, which is restoring 
the cottages to the style of 1807, 
when the last Adams lived there, 
discovered that Abigail Adams, 
the wife of the second president, 
wanted them "stone" and white in 
color. 

And what Abigail wanted, 



Abigail usually got. 

Sometime during the 1890s, 
both houses were painted red, 
and several generations of visitors 
went away with the vision of the 
little red farmhouses at the foot of 
the hill in their minds. 

In the summer of 1980, the 
cottages were repainted the way 
Abigail wanted them, the "stone" 
color, a sort of off-white, being 
specially mixed from a late 18th 
Century formula. 




QUINCY HISTORIC SITES shown on the cover are, top row, 
Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams Birthplaces; First 
Parish Church with Hancock Cemetery in foreground, and the Adams 
Mansion. Middle row, Dorothy Quincy Home, the Abigail Adams 
Cairn, the Josiah Quincy Homestead, and the site of the First 
Productive Iron Works. Bottom row, old City Hall, site of the First 
Commercial Railway and Adams Academy, on the site of the John 
Hancock Birthplace. 



Page 4A Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 




ADAMS MANSION NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 



The Adams Mansion 



Summer White House And Home Of 2 Presidents 



Josiah Quincy, the one who built 
railroads around New England and 
founded the cooperative bank 
movement in Massachusetts, was in 
his boyhood a frequent visitor to the 
mansion where John Adams, the 
second president of the United 
States, lived in retirement. 

Later, he wrote with wry 
amusement about Sunday dinner 
with the aging patriarch of the 
Adams clan and his wife, Abigail, a 
dinner that inevitably began with a 
thick pudding made from boiled corn 
meal. 

". . . it being thought desirable to 
take the edge off one's hunger before 
reaching the joint," wrote Quincy. 

"Indeed, it was considered wise to 
stimulate the young to fill themselves 
with pudding, by the assurance that 
the boy who managed to eat the 
most of it should be helped most 
abundantly to the meat, which was 
to follow. 

"It need not be said that neither 
the winner nor his competitors found 
much room for meat at the close of 
their contest; and so the domestic 
economy of the arrangement was 
very apparent." 

Quincy, as a young Harvard law 
student, stopped by several times a 
week in summer to talk and read to 
the former President. He found the 
visits delightful. Indeed, the Adams 
of the cold and austere public mien 
was never more relaxed and warm 
than he was at his country home in 
Quincy. 

The original house, a small part of 
the present building, was built 
probably in 1731 by Major Leonard 
Vassall, a wealthy West Indian sugar 
planter who lived in Cambridge and 
apparently used it for a summer 
place. 

His daughter, Mrs. Anna Borland, 
who was a Loyalist during the 



Revolution, abandoned the house to 
leave with the British forces when 
they evacuated Boston in 1776. For a 
while it was used as a haven for rebel 
refugees fleeing the war zones. 

Mrs. Borland returned to reclaim 
the house after the Revolution and 
John Adams, then in Europe as the 
first American ambassador to 
London, purchased it for 600 pounds 
through the good offices of one 
Cotton Tufts of Weymouth, his wife 
Abigail's cousin. 

The Adamses were about to 
return to the United States after 
seven years abroad and Abigail was 
concerned that John's books and 
papers and the furnishings they had 
acqiiired in Europe would not fit into 
their old farmhouse at the foot of 
Penn's Hill where they lived before. 

The deal was closed on Sept. 26, 
1787, and the deed is still on file in the 
Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in 
which the Adams purchase is 
specified as a house, barn and other 
bindings on seven acres of land with 
some 76 acres more scattered 
around the North Precinct of 
Braintree. 

There are indications that Abigail 
was at first disappointed with her 
purchase. It was a lot smaller than 
she remembered it. 

"In height and breadth it feels like a 
wren's house," she wrote to her 
daughter, Abigail, the wife of Col. 
William S. Smith. "Let Col. Smith 
come without heels to his shoes or ) 
he will not be able to walk upright." 

Abigail and John Adams moved 
into the house, which they named 
"Peacefield," after his retirement 
from the presidency in 1801 and lived 
there until they dipd. 

It was from the "Old House," as 
the family called it, that John Adams 
carried on his long and increasingly 
warm correspondence with his old 



rival, Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, 
who had succeeded him in the 
presidency. In retirement, they 
became firm friends as they 
outlasted their contemporaries. 

"Thomas Jefferson lives," 
whispered John Adams as he lay 
dying in the Old House. He was 
wrong. Jefferson, in far away 
Monticello, Va., had preceded him in 
death by a few hours on the same 
day. 

It was July 4, 1826, the 50th 
anniversary of the Declaration of 
Independence. 

/ 



The Old House, which served as 
summer White House for two 
presidents, was home to four 
generations of the Adams family, the 
last, Brooks Adams, dying in 
February, 1927. It was taken over by 
the U.S. National Parks Service in 
1946 to become the Adams Mansion 
National Historic Site. 

The site, located at 135 Adams 
St., is open to the public from 
April 19 to Nov. 10 daily from 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is 50 
cents with children under 16 
admitted free. 



The Adams Family 



HENRY ADAMS (1583-1646) 
emigrated from England in 1638 
and was granted 40 acres in 
Mount Wollaston (later Quincy). 

2. JOSEPH ADAMS (1626 
1694), son of Henry, farmer and 
maltster of Old Braintrei*. 

3. JOSEPH ADAMS (1654 
1737), son of Joseph, who 
married Hannah Bass, a 
granddaughter of John Alden and 
Priscilla Mullins. 

4. JOHN ADAMS (1691 1761), 
son of Joseph, farmer and 
selectman of Old Braintree, 
known as Deacon John. 

5. JOHN ADAMS (1735 1826), 
son of Deacon John and second 
President of the United States. 

5a. SAMUEL ADAMS (1722 
1803), revolutionary firebrand; 
great, great grandson of Henry 
and cousin of President John. 

6. JOHN QUINCY ADAMS 
(1767-1848), son of John, sixth 
President of the United States. 

7. CHARLES FRANCIS 
ADAMS (1807-1886). son of John 



Quincy, minister to Great Britain 
during the Civil War. 

8. JOHN QUINCY ADAMS II 
(1833-1894), son of Charles 
Francis, state legislator and thrice 
candidate for governor of 
Massachusetts. 

8a. CHARLES FRANCIS 
ADAMS II (1835 1915), son of 
Charles Francis, historian and 
founder of the Quincy school 
system. 

8b. HENRY ADAMS (1838 
1918). son of Charles Francis, 
author of "The Education of 
Henry Adams." 

8c. BROOKS ADAMS (1848 
1927), son of Charles Francis, the 
Icist Adams to live in the Old 
House in Quincy. 

9. CHARLES FRANCIS 
ADAMS III (1866 1954), son of 
.John Quincy II, mayor of Quincy 
and Secretary of the Navy under 
President Hoover. 

10. CHARLES FRANCIS 
ADAMS IV (1910- ), chairman 
of the board of Raytheon Co. 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 5A 




LEO J. KELLY 
City Council President 
Councillor, Ward 1 




JOHN J. QUINN 
Asst. City Council President 
Councillor at-large 




JOHN J. LYDON, JR. 
Councillor, Ward 3 




CHRISTOPHER KENNEDY 
School Committee Vice Chairman 




Proudly 

Serving Historic 

Quincy Today 



CITY COUNCIL 






FRANCIS X. McCA ULE Y 
Councillor at-large 



JOSEPH J. LaRAIA 
Councillor at-large 





JAMES A. SHEETS 
Councillor, Ward 4 



STEPHEN J. McGRA TH 
Councillor, Ward 5 




SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE 







ARTHUR H. TOBIN 

Mayor and 

School Committee Chairman 




DANIEL G. RA YMONDI 
Councillor, Ward 2 




JOANNE CONDON 
Councillor, Ward 6 




DR. LAWRENCE CREEDON 
Superintendent of Schools 




FRANK ANSELMO 



MARY COLLINS 



JOAN PICARD 



PATRICIA TOLAND 



JOHN J. SULLIVAN 



Page 6A Quincy Sun Thursday, Julv 9, 1981 





TOMBS OF PRESIDENTS John and John Quincy Adams and their wives in 
First Parish Church. 



FIRST PARISH CHURCH 



First Parish Church 



Where 2 Presidents, Their Wives Are Entombed 



In 1949, when the present First 
Parish Church building, the Old 
Stone Temple, was 121 years old, it 
was ruled officially that the church is 
older than the city itself and the town 
before it. 

It was then that the late historian 
William Churchill Edwards was 
called upon to resolve a minor 
dispute that involved the rounding of 



the corners of the church lot in 
downtown Quincy. 

"Almost the first subject to which 
the minds of the early settlers of our 
country were turned after they 
landed here was the formation of a 
church," said Edwards. 

The first church in these parts was 
established as a branch of the 
Church of Boston in 1636. It became 



We Need 
You! 

If You Are Interested in Promoting Tourism In Quincy 

We Need You! 



Tht Quincy Tourism Aaaoclation (a non-profit 
organisation) it accepting membarahlp applications 



Waara a now, Irtdepandant, long ranga planning group. 
Our goal la to promote Quincy in terms of History, 
Culture, Recreation ami Special Events. 

Our members are from all segments of the community. 
If you are an area resident or business person and you 
ate Interested In promoting Quincy, we need you. 

We are presently staffing the following committees: 
• Historteat Sites* Education •Retail Trade* Media 
and Public Relations • Travel • Recreetlon. 

Other committees planned are: Finance, 
Transportation and Volunteer co m m it tee s . 

If you would like further information on this exciting 
and dynamic organisation p lea se contact: 



Quincy Tourism Association Inc. 

A Non Profit Organization 

112 Robertson Street 
Quincy MA. 021 69 



a church in its own right in 1639. The 
Mount Wollaston section of Boston 
was incorporated as the town of 
Braintree on May 23, 1640. Ergo, the 
church came first! 

Quincy's first house of worship, 
the branch of the Church of Boston, 
was called the "Chappel of Ease," 
and if it was neglected by early 
historians it was because its first 
pastor, the Rev. John Wheelwright, 
his sister-in-law, Anne Hutchinson, 
and others were banished from the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony for 
heresy. 

The new church, the one that 
lasted, was gathered by covenant on 
Sept. 26, 1639, and it was holding 
services in its third meeting house in 
1732 when its pastor was the Rev. 
John Hancock, father of the bold 
first signer of the Declaration of 
Independence. Son John also was a 
member. 

The affairs of the church and the 
town of Quincy were one and the 
same until 1824 when church and 
state were separated in Massachu- 
setts and the Congregational Society 
was established to handle parochial 
matters. 

The old Hancock meeiing house 
was still standing, although a little 
run down, on the south lawn of the 
present church lot in 1822 when 
former President John Adams 
deeded the interest from certain of 
his lands and granite from his 
pastures to build a stone temple. 

It was completed in Greek revival 
style at a cost of $30,488.56 - which 
was some $3,000 less than architect 



Alexander Parrish's estimate -- and 
dedicated Nov. 12, 1828, with John 
Quincy Adams, the sixth president 
of the United States, holding Pew 
No. 1. 

Even before the church was 
dedicated, the mortal remains of its 
benefactors, John and Abigail 
Adams, were transferred to tombs in 
the crypt of the church and, in 1852, 
the bodies of John Quincy Adams 
and his wife, Louisa, joined them. 

It is the only church in the United 
States in which two Presidents are 
buried. The only other church in 
which a President is buried is the 
Episcopal Cathedral in Washington 
D.C., where President Woodrow 
Wilson is entombed. 

The First Parish Church at 
1306 Hancock St., also known as 
the Church of the Presidents, 
was accorded the status of a 
national landmark by the U.S. 
government in 1971 and placed 
on the National Register of 
Historic Places as a building that 
has "historic value to the nation." 

Still an active Unitarian 
church, it is open to the public for 
tours from mid-May through mid- 
September, Monday through 
Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Donations are accepted. There is 
a charge of 50 cents per adult for 
organized tour groups, which 
should make an appointment at 
least one week in advance. Tours 
of the church at other times 
during the year may also be made 
by appointment. 



Quincy Sun Staff- 



Historic Quincy, a special 
supplement to The Quincy Sun, 
was produced by the following 
members of The Sun staff: 

Henry Bosworth, Tom 
Henshaw, Cheryl Burns, Linda 
Bosworth, Eve Connell, Muriel 
Lyon, Virginia Moore, Ken 



Recanzone, Michele Saar and 
Pamela Rosenblatt. Most of the 
writing is by Mr. Henshaw. 

Photos are by the Massachu- 
setts Department of Commerce 
and Quincy Sun photographers 
Dave Gillooly and Steve 
Grochowski. 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 7A 




Freedom off choice. 

That's what Quincy Savings' 
Pay-by-Phone service offers you 

You'll enjoy freedom from writing 
checks, addressing envelopes, and 
finding stamps or a mailbox. 
Whenever you choose, you 
can pay many of your bills 
with one simple phone call. 
It's easier and faster, which 
saves a little time. And each 
transaction costs five cents 
Jess than postage alone, 
which saves you a little 
money You can even take 
advantage of Pay-by-Phone 
when you're away from 
home or on vacation 

Of course, when 
you choose to 
write checks, 
you're free to 
use your 
REDi-NOW 
checking ac- 
count as you 
normally would 

Next time you pick up your 

checkbook to pay some 

bills, think how much 

easier it would be to pick 

up the telephone instead. * 

Think about the freedom 

of choice you can have with 

Quincy Savings' REDi-NOW 

checking account and Pay-by 

Phone feature, a combination we call The Bill System. 

Here you have it. Checking, with or without checks. For an 

application or more information, call 471-3500 or visit our 

nearest office. 



Member FDIC DIFM 

Quincy, Hanover, Braintree and Nonvell 
471-3500 



Page 8A Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 



* 



Quincy is 
banking 

on the 
American 

Way. 



No city reflects the American way of life 
quite like Quincy. Traditional American vir- 
tues are reflected even in the way its people 
bank. 

That's why more and more Quincy residents 
are banking the American Way. At 1st 
American Bank for Savings. 1st American 
knows what Quincy wants from a bank. So 
we provide a full range of better banking 
services. And reinvest customer deposits 
back into the communities we serve. 

That's banking, the American Way. 



jilst Rmerian Bank 



10 offices in Greater Boston 



Quincy: 
Boston: 

Dorchester 



Mattapan: 
Roslindale: 
Stoughton: 
Telephone 



77 Granite St. (Telephone: 471-1112) 
80 Arch Street, Corner Franklin 
Copley Square, 510 Boylston Street 
Upham's Corner, 572 Columbia Road 
Codman Square, 569 Washington St. 
Bayside Shopping Mall, 234 Mt. Vernon St. 
Neponset, 731 Morrissey Blvd. 
Mattapan Square, 1625 Blue Hill Ave. 
700 American Legion Highway 
438 Washington St. (Telephone: 344-1500) 
436-1500 Connecting All Offices 



Hancock Cemetery 



BANKING, THE AMERICAN WAY. 



Member F.D.I.C. 



Patriots, Early 
Settlers, Intrigue 
Buried Here 



Henry, the first Adams in Quincy, 
is buried there. So is the Rev. John 
Hancock, father of the first signer of 
the Declaration cf Independence. 
And Col. John Quincy, for whom the 
city is named. 

But of all the 800 graves in the 
Hancock Cemetery, the Old Burying 
Ground of Colonial Quincy, most 
intriguing is one marked by a 
tombstone bearing this cryptic 
epitaph: 

"Erected to the memory of John R. 
Grieve: Died Nov. 12, 1850, age 22 
years, and Hannah Banks, his wife, 
died Nov. 12, 1850, age 15 years. 
Both of Zanesville, Ohio. Deluded by 
the writings of A.J. Davis." 
- The mystery of John and Hannah 
has never been fully solved. 

They came to Quincy in 1850, not 
as man and wife, but as male cousins, 
John Green and George Sands. 
They obtained work in a shoe factory 
but rarely left their lodgings on Elm 
St., spending long hours reading 
books on spiritualism. 

Co-workers thought that George 
Sands looked frail, almost 
effeminate. It was widely suspected 
that "he" was a girl. A scheme was 
devised to test the theory. 

One day at lunch one of the shoe 
workers tossed George an apple. A 
( man would catch it by closing his 
legs; a woman by spreading her skirt. 
Guess what "George" did! 

Humiliated, John and Hannah 
never went back to the factory. Nor 
did they ever return to the house on 
Elm St. Their frozen bodies were 
found next spring by rabbit hunters 
on Penn's Hill, locked in a loving 
embrace. 

Several months later, the father of 
John Grieve arrived from Ohio to 
bury the young couple. It was he who 
directed the words to be chiselled on 
the headstone. He explained no 
further. 

A. J. Davis was never identified for 
sure. But Andrew Jackson Davis, a 
spiritualist, hypnotist and faith 
healer, was then practicing in 
Boston. 

Among the belongings found in 
the Elm St. lodging house were these 
words, written by 15-year-old 
Hannah Banks: 

"To the oppressed and 
downtrodden, to the suffering and 
afflicted, I would cry out . . . Death is 
only an event, only a circumstance in 
the eternal life experience of the 
human soul. Death is simply a birth 
into a new and perfect state of 
existence." 

Not far from the grave of John and 
Hannah is a tomb bearing words t hat 
cry out of an earlier injustice: 
. "Three precious friends under this 
tombstone lie 




HANCOCK CEMETERY 

"Patterns to aged, youth and 
inldncy. 

, "A great mother, her learned son, 
with child, 

"The first and least went free. He 
was exiled. 

"In love to Christ, this country, 
and dear friends 

"He left his own, cross'd seas and 
for amends 

"Was here extoll'd, and envy'd, all 
in a breath, 

"His noble consort leaves, is 
drawn to death, 

"Stranger changes may befall us 
ere we die, 

"Blest they who will arrive eternity. 

"God grant some names, O thou 
New England's friend. 

"Don't sooner fade than thine, if 
times don't mend. 

The tomb with its hidden message 
contains the family of the Rev. 
Leonard Hoar, third president of 
Harvard College, a man too liberal 
for his times. 

He was forced by the General 
Court of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony to resign at the instigation of 
religious opponents and jealous 
colleagues for permitting Harvard to 
"languish and decay." Eight months 
later, in November, 1675, he was 
dead at 45. 

In 1975, the same General Court, 
now of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, righted the 300-year- 
old wrong done to the Rev. Mr. Hoar 
by "proclaiming and confirming his 
innocence of any misdeeds while 
president of Harvard College." 

The cemetery, on Hancock St., 
Quincy Sq., next to City Hall, is 
open to the public. There is no 
admission charge. 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 9A 




START YOUR SUMMER 

h QUINCY on the PATRIOT'S TR A II 
through historic Norfolk County. 




***^*&i&ms» 



Your summer vacation starts 
here, in Quincy, the heart of Norfolk 
County — discovering the things 
that bring people from all over the 
world to our backyard. 

The Patriot's Trail map and guide 
lists many things to see in Norfolk 
County, including the birthplaces of 
three U.S. Presidents, interesting 
museums, recreational areas . . . 
plus new restaurants to try, places 
to stay and places to shop. 

Become a tourist this summer. 
The best place to start is Quincy. 




Norfolk County Development & Tourist Council 

1776 Heritage Drive, Dept. QS, Quincy, Mass. 02171 (617) 328-1776 

Norfolk County Commissioners 
James J. Collins, Chairman; David C. Ahearn; George B. McDonald. 



Page IOA Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 




is soaring 

in The Sea Belt. 

The South Shore 
of Massachusetts 

The South Shore Chamber of Commerce firmly believes 
that our area offers great advantages to business and industry. 
Hence, we have created the term we call "The Sea Belt",i M , The 
"Sea Belt " of New England, the South Shore of Massachusetts 
running from Boston to Plymouth, offers a rather unique 
geographic, social, and recreational opportunity for 
businesses to expand and relocate. 

Through our affiliate. The South Shore Economic 
Development Corporation, we are helping individual 
business grow through small business loans. 

The tourism industry in the coastal South Shore 
Communities needs not only individual but also collective 
action with creative regional approaches. Quincy has 
recognized this need. 

QUINCY YESTERDAY -with America's historical roots 
of democracy and industry, makes it potentially one of the 
most exciting historical cities in the United States. 

QUINCY TODAY - where pride in our city has led to 
planned economic development where tourism play a part and 
the past and present blend through a sense of dedication and 
tradition. 

QUINCY TOMORROW - a city that is broadening its 
scope lor the future. Tourism is a viable economic industry and 
defines the Chamber's objectives of creating jobs and 
promoting business. The "Sea Belt" of New England, the 
South Shore of Massachusetts, will not be a short-lived 
phenomenon. We can say, to all concerned, that we are 
justifiably proud of our past and very confident of our future. 
Call on us: 

The South Shore Chamber of Commerce 

36 Miller Stile Rd. Quinev MA. 02169 
617-479-1111 



This advertisement was produced in cooperation with the Norfolk County 
Development & Tourist Council and the Norfolk County Commission. 



Abigail Adams Wife, 
Mother Of Presidents 



Mrs. John Adams, the former 
Abigail Smith of Weymouth, is the 
only woman to be wife of one 
president and mother of another • 
- and she could have been 
grandmother of a vice president. 

Husband John was chief 
executive from 1797 to 1801; son 
John Quincy occupied the White 
House from 1825 to 1829; and 
grandson Charles Francis Adams 
ran for vice president on the Free 
Soil ticket in 1848. 

An early advocate of women's 
rights, Abigail Adams once wrote 
to her husband, John: 

"In the new code of laws which I 
suppose it will be necessary for 
you to make, I desire you would 
remember the ladies and be more 
generous and favorable to them 
than your ancestors. 

"Do not put such unlimited 
power into the hands of the 
husbands. Remember, all men 
would be tyrants if they could." 




ABIGAIL ADAMS 



It Was Richard 



For years, the first name of Capt. 
Wollaston, the leader of the original 
settlers of Quincy in 1625, was lost to 
history. 



Only recently did the researches 
of H. Hobart Holly, historian of the 
Quincy Historical Society, turn up 
the information that it probably was 
Richard. 



Royal Snub 

The title page of a 17th Century Revolution in order to delete the 

Book of Common Prayer now at customary prayers for King George 

Christ Episcopal Church on Quincy III and the Royal family. 
Ave. was torn out during the 



We have a 
"history" of being 
on top! 



Top interest in Massachusetts. 
No bank pays higher. 



GiSnite^ 

co-qper^tive^ 
c B2Jnk 




ALL DEPOSITS INSURED IN FULL 



North Quincy 

440 Hancock St. 

773-8100 

Quincy Center 

100 Granite St. 

471-3900 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun PaRe MA 



Quincy Historical Society 
Library and Museum 




Whether it's Routes 3, 3 A, 128, the Southeast Expressway or the MBTA, they all lead to the Quincy 
Historical Society Library and Museum at the historic Adams Academy Building. 

You will also find us on The Quincy Center Walking Tour Map along with other Quincy historic sites. 

Here we have historic records and memorabilia of the first commercial railway, the granite, maritime and 
glass industries, Indian artifacts, early furniture, textiles, sculpture, photographs and prints. 

Our 5000-volume research and reference library contains land records, genealogical, archeological 
papers, maps and other materials for students, scholars, educators and the history buff. 

Our museum, the Adams Academy, is steeped in history itself. One of the outstanding preparatory 
schools of the United States, it was opened Sept. 4, 1872 and closed in 1907. Students attended from 
throughout the U.S. and foreign lands. It reached a peak of 154 students. Tuition was $100 per annum. 

This beautiful building constructed of sturdy Quincy granite with red brick trimming cost $28,867.99. 

I listory in Quincy is a way of life. So is the Quincy Historical Society. 

And the Society looks ahead with confidence and enthusiasm to meet its new challenges and 

responsibilities of the future. 

Membership in The Quincy Historical Society is open to everyone. The Quincy Historical Society has 
something for everyone. 

-Join us and become a part ol this great history. 



Write: 



or L\\\ 



The Quincy Historical Society 

8 Adams Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

(617) 773-1144 



This advertisement produced in cooperation with the Norfolk County Tourist Council 
the Norfolk County Commissioners and a friend o) The Quincy Historical Society.) 



Page I2A Quino Sun Thursda). July 9. 1981 



Let Us Show You 



MAP HIGHLIGHTS 



1. Town Hall; City Hall of Quincy - Architect and builder, 
Solomon Willard. Completed November 1, 1844. Built of 
Quincy granite. 

2. Adams Academy - Site of the birthplace of John Hancock, the 
Patriot. Erected in 1871. Now the home of The Quincy 
Historical Society. World War I statue and memorial. Bust of 
Hancock. Historical exhibit. 

3 Adams National Historic Site - Built in 1731 by Major 
Leonard Vassal!. Purchased by President John Adams in 1787, 
and occupied by four generations of the Adams family. 

4 Dorothy Quincy Homestead - Dating from 1685, it was the 
home of four generations of the Edmund Quincy family. Home 
of Dorothy Quincy who married John Hancock. 

5. Woodward School - Founded by Dr. Ebenezer Woodward in 
1869 to educate Quincy-born girls. 

6. Milestone Marker - The Neponset Turnpike (now Hancock 
Street) gave people a shorter route to Boston. This milestone 
(almost illegible) marks 7 1 . miles from Boston. An older 
milestone across the way, on Adams Academy grounds, marks 
the miles on the old route via Milton. 

7. Old Court House - District Court of East Norfolk was 
established in 1872. This courthouse, built in 1912, has been 
replaced by a modern building on Chestnut Street. 

8. Quincy Junior College - Formerly the Coddington School 
built in 1909, then a "modern" elementary school. 

9. Bethany Church - Built in 1928 in Gothic style, its gargoyles, 
four feet long, are the longest in New England. 

10. Thomas Crane Public Library - Designed by Henry Hobson 
Richardson, foremost architect of his era. Commissioned in 
1880 by Albert Crane in memory of his father. 

11. United First Parish Church - A fine example of the Greek 
Revival period designed by Alexander Parrish and constructed 
in 1828. John Adams and his wife Abigail, and John Quincy 
Adams and his wife Louisa Catherine are bun?d in the church. 

12. Hancock Cemetery - Dated around 1640 and named for the 
Reverend John Hancock, father of the Patriot. The oldest 
headstone is dated 1666. 

13 Post Office. 

14. Christ Church - Oldest Episcopal parish in the state. 

15. St. John the Baptist Church - Roman Catholic. 
16 Christ Church Cemetery. 

17. Birthplaces of John Adams and John Quincy Adams - the 

nation's only father and son presidents. The two salt box 
farmhouses, undergoing restoration by the National Park 
Service are a brief walk down Franklin Street. 






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Birthplaces 

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1259 Hancock Street, Quincy (Main Office) 

Tedeschi's Plaza, 280 Grove Street, Brarntree 

Junction Routes 53 and 139, Hanover 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun P«|« 13A 



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Coming Soon: 85 Quincy Avenue, Quincy 



Page 14 A Ouino Sun I hursda> luK '». I'»NI 

f 

Adams Academy 

On Site Of 
John Hancock's 



Birthplace 



By modern standards, the 
boarding house at the corner of 
Hancock and Depot Sts. had all the 
aspects of a genteel prison. 

Residents were forbidden to leave 
between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. They 
could not enter or leave at any time 
except by the hall door. They were 
banned from pool halls and bars. 
Smoking materials also were 
forbidden to them. 

In exchange for good behavior, 
plus tuition ranging from $75 to $150 
a year, they were given the best prep 
school education of the day for they 
were students at Adams Academy. 
which flourished from 1872 to 1907 in 
Qumcy. 

The academy was a gift of John 
Adams, the second president of the 
United States, who always had his 
checkbook ready to fill the spiritual 
and educational needs of the citizens 
of his beloved Qumcy. 

The trust fund, nourished by 
"rents, profits and emoluments" 
from certain Adams o w n e d 
properties, was set up in the Adams 
will of 1822, but it was not until 1869 
that the fund was deemed large 
enough to start construction. 



The location was specified by- 
Adams himself as the corner of 
Adams and Hancock Sts., site of the 
birthplace of his childhood friend, 
John Hancock, the first signer of the 
Declaration of Independence. 

The doors opened to the first 
students, 24 of them, on Sept. 4. 
1872. Five years later, the academy 
reached a peak enrollment of 154 
with an international student body - 
25 from Qumcy, four from 
Washington, DC, 125 from 14 
Mates, two from England and one 
from Chile. 

It had one of the earliest prep 
school football teams, too, recording 
a tie with the Resolutes of Boston on 
Oct. 21, 187b, a scant seven years 
alter Princeton and Rutgers played 
the first college game. It whipped 
Andover three times from 1877 79. 

The admissions catalogue 
specified that applicants be "well 
prepared in the usual studies of good 
grammar schools" and warned that 
"no pupils are desired whose parents 
do not intend to give them a 
i ollegiate education." 

1 lie best known headmaster was 
Dr William Everett, once acclaimed 



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A Salute 
to Qirincy 

Birthplace of 

Constitutional 

Rights 

BayBank 

Norfolk Trust 



Member f D l C 



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ADAMS ACADEMY, now home of the Quincy Historical Society. 



as one of the seven smartest men in 
the world. He ran the academy with a 
firm hand from 1878 to 1893 and 
again from 1897 to 1907. From 1893 
to 1897, he was a U.S. congressman 
from Lynn. 

Dr, Everett, an aimiable if 
sometimes waspish eccentric, was 
widely known as the man who hated 
Abraham Lincoln. Hi' had reason. 
His father was Edward Everett, 
wiiose masterful oration at 
( iettysburg was over shadowed by 
Lin* oln's notes scribbled on the 
back of an envelope. 

It was Dr. Everetl who signaled the 
passing of Adams Academy and 
many other 19th Century classical 
prep schools at graduation 

exercises in 1907 when he said that 



"unless someone came forward and 
planked down $50,000, the academy 
will be closed." 

Nobody did and on June 22, 1907. 
the Adams Academy officialy closed 
its doors. 

The building today is occupied 
by the Quincy Historical Society, 
which maintains a museum and 
research library in the old 
classrooms. The museum is open 
all year, Monday through Friday 
from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., and 
Saturday from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 
p.m., or by appointment. The 
library is open Wednesday from 
9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., and 
Saturday from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 
p.m., or by appointment. There is 
no admission charge. 



J 



To Be Part Of 

Quincy's Proud History 

Is A Proud Honor 



V. 




Quincy Lodge No. 1295 
Order Sons Of Italy In America 





*MWmilSmm 



120 Quarry St., Quincy 



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Thursday. July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page ISA 



Abigail Adams Cairn 

The Smoke Could Be 
Seen Over Bunker Hill 



Abigail Adams was awakened at 
dawn in the farmhouse at the foot of 
Penn's Hill by the sound of faroff 
guns. All through the sweltering 
morning of June 17, 1775, as she 
hustled about with the chores, the 
dull boom of cannon intruded on her 
consciousness. 

Riders on the Coast Road to 
Plymouth, stopping at the 
farmhouse for a drink of water, told 
her of a great battle underway on 
Breed's Hill in Charlestown. 

One of them brought word that 
Dr. Joseph Warren had been killed 
in the fighting and little Abby, age 10, 
burst into tears, and John Quincy, 
nearly 8, felt bewildered and sad for 
Dr. Warren was the Adams family 
doctor in Boston. 

In the afternoon, Abigail could 
stand it no longer. Taking Abby and 
John Quincy by the hand, she 
walked up the Coast Road to the top 
of Penn's Hill "and climbed up on the 
rocks for a better view. 

The panorama of the Bay, a 
shimmering blue in the sunshine, 
spread out before them, the tiny 
houses on the three hills of Boston 
and, beyond, the black smoke rising 
in billows. 

"Good God," exclaimed Abigail, 
"they are burning Charlestown!" 

The scene etched itself forever in 
John Quincy 's memory. 



The early days of the Revolution 
were times of turmoil in Old 
Braintree and its North Precinct, 
which was later called Quincy. 

Her husband, John, was away 
most of the time at the Continental 
Congress in Philadelphia, leaving 31- 
year old Abigail to manage the farm 
and look to the needs of four small 
children, Abigail, John Quincy, 
Charles 5, and Thomas Boylston 3. 

There were days of alarm as the 
British, penned up in Boston by the 
brand new Continental Army, 
foraged up and down the coast for 
supplies. Refugees from occupied 
Boston and the inner towns of 
Dorchester and Roxbury sometimes 
slept in the kitchen and in the fields. 

As the wife of a member of 
Congress, Abigail was a center of 
attention. The house on the Coast 
Road was a favorite stopping place 
for travelers to Plymouth. Politicians 
up from Philadelphia made it a point 
to stop by for a visit with John 
Adams' wife. 

Abigail was invited to visit Gen. 
George Washington's headquarters 
at Winter Hill. The aristocratic 
Washington was suspect among 
New Englanders. He was a Virginian; 
he was an Anglican; and, it was said, 
he held slaves. But John Adams liked 
him and Abigail was soon charmed. 

One day, young John Quincy 




ABIGAIL ADAMS CAIRN 



came home to find his Uncle Elihu 
melting down Abigail's pewter 
spoons in the kitchen to make bullet 
molds. He looked at his mother and 
she looked back at him and 
something indefinable passed 
between them. 

"Do you wonder," wrote the sixth 
president of the United States some 
68 years later, "that a boy of 7 who 



witnessed this scene should be a 
patriot." 

In 1896, where the old Coast 
Road (now Franklin St.) meets 
Viden Rd. atop Penn's Hill a 
stone cairn was built to mark the 
spot where Abigail and young 
John Quincy watched the Battle 
of Bunker Hill. It is open to the 
public free of charge. 



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A fitting memorial . . . 



John Quincy Adams occupied the White House in 1828 when United 
First Parish Church, the Stone Temple, was built of Quincy granite, a 
fitting memorial to the enduring work of the men who founded the state 
and the nation. 

Two presidents of the United States, John Adams and John Quincy 
Adams, and their wives, are buried side by side in vaults in the grotto of 
the Church. 

The cornerstone of the Stone Temple was laid on June 11, 1827, and 
in it was placed a silver plate with the inscription: 'A temple for the 
worship of God, and for public instruction in the doctrines and duties of 
the Christian religion.' 

Historic Hancock Cemetery in the foreground is the final resting 
place of early Quincy settlers and patriots among them Col. John 
Quincy for whom Quincy was named and Rev. John Hancock, a 
minister of First Parish Church and father of the first signer of the 
Declaration of Independence. 

Burgin Platner Insurance is located beside and across from these two 
historic sites. 



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1357 HANCOCK STREET. QUINCY. MASSACHUSETTS 02189 

472-3000 



NC 



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Pile l*A Quincy Sun Thursdiy, July 9. 1981 



The Thomas Crane Library 



A Romanesque 
Architectural Beauty 



He came to Quincy as a boy of 7, 
grew to young manhood on a farm 
in Quincy Point, learned the 
granite-cutters' trade, and left at 
the age of 26 to win fame and 
fortune in stone in New York City. 

That was the last Quincy saw of 
Thomas Crane for half a century 
until one February day in 1880, five 
years after his death, when his son, 
Albert, appeared with $20,000 with 
which to build a memorial -- 
preferably a library - to his father. 

"My father always retained a 
strong feeling for the town of 
Quincy," was his only explanation. 

Albert Crane himself chose the 
man to design the building, Henry 
Hobson Richardson, grandson of 
the English scientist Dr. Joseph 
Priestley and the foremost 
American architect of the day. 

His reputation was so formidable 
that he was able to tell Crane, "I 
cannot guarantee that the building, 
when completed, shall conform to 
(your) ideas of beauty or taste, ' ' and 
still get the job. 

Richardson's Romanesque 

building, which now houses the 
reference section of the library, was 
dedicated on May 30, 1882, with the 
principal oration delivered by 
Charles Francis Adams Jr., chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees. 

It was Adams who gave the 



library its name. Albert Crane 
wanted it to be "The Quincy Free 
Public Library." Adams insisted on 
"The Thomas Crane Public 
Library." 

"Who's giving the building?" 
asked Albert Crane. 

"You are, but you wouldn't have 
if it hadn't been for me," said 
Adams, who was used to having his 
way around Quincy ,- and that was 
that. 

President John Adams' modest 
collection of books was housed in 
the library until 1893, when it was 
discovered that in 11 years only two 
persons, one of them Charles 
Francis Adams Jr. , had asked to see 
them. They were then transferred to" 
the Boston Public Library. 

At the start, Richardson's 
magnificent building was all but 
hidden behind a grain store, a hotel, 
an office building and four homes 
that lined Washington St. 

Albert Crane, however, was a 
persistent man and, by the time he 
died in 1917, he had purchased and 
torn down all the buildings, leaving 
a broad expanse of open space to 
enhance the library. 

But before the lawn could be 
seeded, World War I intervened 
and, in a burst of patriotism -- 
"Food will win the war," they said 
-- the area was planted with 



r 





* * 4 ■ 



• Charity 

• Justice 

• Brotherly 
Love 






• Fidelity 



*>•-• * * 



<&*?t> 



mi 



We Are Celebrating Our 

76th Anniversary 
And Proud To Be A 
Part Of Quincy 's History 

QUINCY LODGE OF ELKS 

No. 943 

1220 Hancock St., Quincy 




THOMAS CRANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



potatoes, tended by an expert 
brought in from Maine. The 
experiment failed. 

"There wasn't a potato in the lot 
that was anywhere near as large as 
a golf ball," said Mayor Joseph L. 
Whiton. The harvest was donated to 
the poor farm. 

Albert Crane also put up $64,000 
to build the Spear St. wing of the 
library in 1907-08 and the Crane 



family gave yet another $164,000 for 
the free standing addition, built in 
1936, that now houses the stacks 
and the children's section. 

The Thomas Crane Public 
Library, 40 Washington St., is 
open to the public, free of charge, 
from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday 
through Friday, year around, and 
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 
September through May. 



Quincy has . . . 



Two Well Known 



Independents 



Doran & Horrigan 



^Independent 



yourA 
Insurance § /ageimi 

SERVES YOU FIRST 

We Work for You 



19 Billings Road 
IM. Quincy 

328-0100 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Pace I7A 








We are proud 

tobe apart of 
Quincy a city 

with a rich and 

historical past 

and a great future 



Savings Bank 

"ALWAYS THE LEADER'; 



690 Adams Street Lakin Square, Quincy 




Page 18 A Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 



We Are 
Proud 

To Have 
Quincy In 
Our Name 




Today's 

Quincy Sun 

Is Tomorrow's 

Quincy History. 



Keeping It Accurate Means 
Alot To You And To Us. 




Quincy's Own Newspaper 



1372 Hancock Street, Quincy Square 

471-3100 




THE GRANITE RAILWAY 



The Granite Railway 

First Commercial 
Railroad In U.S. 



It was the darndest looking 
contraption that many among the 
distinguished gathering had ever 
seen. 

Each of the three wagons had four 
wheels, 6% feet in diameter, 
surmounted by a smaller gear wheel 
which was used to raise and lower 
the cargo platform that was slung 
low between the wheels. 

It rode on foot-high wooden rails, 
topped by iron plate, which rested on 
stone sleepers or cross ties, placed 
eight feet apart and firmly supported 
on crushed granite to a depth 
beyond the frost line. 

On Saturday, Oct. 7, 1826, the 
wagons were laden with 16 tons of 
the finest Quincy granite and the 
opening day guests were properly 
amazed when a single horse moved 
the whole thing with ease more than 
three miles to a special wharf on the 
Neponset River. 

The granite blocks, a particularly 
hard and weather-resistant stone 
capable of taking a brilliant polish, 
were en route to Charlestown, 
where they were building a 
monument to the Battle of Bunker 
Hill. 

The Granite Railway, the first such 
commercial venture in the United 
States, was built specifically to 
transport stone tor the Bunker Hill 
Monument. 

That it became successful, and a 
model for others around the 
country, is a tribute to three vastly 
dissimilar men, the engineer Gridley 
Bryant, the architect Solomon 
Willard and the financier, Col. 
Thomas Handasyd Perkins. 

Bryant was 37 at the time but 
already an engineer of note. He 
invented the eight wheeled railroad 
car and, when a fellow named Ross 
Winans of Baltimore sued to 
establish a patent on it, Bryant was 
able to prove his claim to the 
satisfaction of the U.S. Supreme 
Court. 

Willard, then 43, was a great bear 
of a man, gentle, obliging, 
industrious. Frivolity, it was said, was 
alien to him and he was never known 
to run. He could be crotchety, too. 
He was a carpenter turned wood- 



carver, turned stone-carver and, 
finally, architect. 

Perkins was the autocratic, 52- 
year-old merchant king of Boston 
who was said to have been offered 
the post of Secretary of the Navy by 
President Washington and turned it 
down with the observation that he 
owned more ships than the Navy. 

It was Perkins who lobbied the 
Railway's charter through a puzzled 
and obstinate State Legislature, 
which had never been called upon to 
incorporate a commercial railroad 
before. It was Perkins who financed 
it, too, largely with his own money. 

Even in its early days, the Granite 
Railway was a tourist attraction of 
some magnitude. 

Daniel Webster, who used to stop 
off for a pick me-up in Quincy en 
route from Boston and Washington 
to his home in Marshfield, viewed it 
and decided that it would never 
succeed because of the frost that 
would form on the rails in the winter. 

The President of the United 
States, a local boy named John 
Quincy Adams, visited in August, 
1827, got caught in a thunderstorm 
and took shelter in a shed where 
Willard's stone-cutters were hacking 
away at monument granite. 

A group of visitors were riding up 
the Railway's incline in an empty car 
on July 25, 1832, when the chain 
broke and catapulted them over a 
'10-foot cliff. One was killed in what 
may have been the first railroad 
fatality in the United States. 

The Granite Railway Co. survived 
until 1870, some 27 years after the 
Bunker Hill Monument was finished, 
when most of its track was taken 
over by the Old Colony Railroad, 
which in turn became a division of 
the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford. 

Today much of the roadbed, over 
which freight moved commercially 
on rails for the first time in America, 
is buried under the macadam of the 
Southeast Expressway. 

The incline of the old Railway 
has been restored and is located 
at the dead end of Mullin Ave. in 
West Quincy. It is open to the 
public year around 24 hours a 
day. There is no admission 
charge. 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 19A 



Dorothy Quincy Homestead 



John Hancock's Declaration Of Love 



An aur<i of romance surrounds the 
stately old house that is set back in 
the trees from the corner of 
Hancock St. and Butler Rd. on the 
banks of Furnace Brook. 

There is the wallpaper with its blue 
cupids and pink flowers that was 
imported from France for the 
wedding of Dorothy Quincy, the 
vivacious daughter of the house, to 
Quincy born John Hancock, a 
patriot on the run with a price on his 
head. 

There are the words "You I Love 
and You alone," addressed by 
Hancock to his beloved Dorothy and 
scratched on a window pane with his 
diamond ring just before he fled to 
Lexington on the eve of the 
Revolution. 

i And there are the secret 
chambers and passageways, used, it 
was said, to hide fugitive patriots 
during the Revolution and, at an 
earlier date, even certain Englishmen 
fleeing a charge of regicide in the 
death of King Charles I. 

Parts of the house were built in 
1685 by Col. Edmund Quincy, the 
second of the name, on land that 
was granted to an earlier Edmund in 
1638. The major part was built in 
1706 by Edmund the third. (There 
were six Edmunds in all, four in a 
direct line; two nephews.) 

The house was the social center of 
old Braintree during the regime of 



the fourth Edmund, largely because 
he sired five beautiful daughters 
around whom swirled a whole 
future generation of judges, 
generals and merchant kings. 

The undisputed belle of the 
household was Dorothy, the 
coquettish youngest of the eight 
Quincy children, whose troth was 
soon plighted to John Hancock, the 
wealthy young businessman from 
Boston who was already becoming 
known as a leader of the rebels. 

Tradition has it that they were to 
have been married in the north 
parlor of the Quincy homestead with 
its French cupid wallpaper when 
Revolution intervened and John had 
to flee with the British on his heels. 

Eventually, they were wed Aug. 
28, 1775, at the home of Thaddeus 
Burr, uncle of Aaron Burr (later vice 
president of the United States) in 
Fairfield, Conn. 

After the Revolution and the death 
of Edmund the fourth in 1788 the old 
house passed from the Quincy 
family. The Hancocks wanted 
nothing to do with it. Their only son, 
John George Washington Hancock, 
was killed in a skating accident at age 
9 while on a visit in 1787. 

The house was acquired in 1904 by 
the Massachusetts Society of 
Colonial Dames, who restored it 
with vintage furniture, utensils and 
clothing, and gave it to the state with 




DOROTHY QUINCY HOMESTEAD 



the proviso that the Dames continue 
to run it. 

The Dorothy Quincy Home- 
stead is open to the public May 
through October, Tuesday 



through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 
5 p.m. (last tour at 4:30 p.m.) 
There is a $1.50 admission 
charge for adults, 25 cents for 
children. 



DOWNTOWN 

BUSINESS £ POWISMnx ASBOCIATON, 



. . A Part of 

QUINCY 

The Historic City 



American Cable System 

Anodyne Medical Services 

Bargain Center 

Barker's 

Richard P. Barry, Insurance 

Baskin-Robbins 

BayBank/ Norfolk County Trust 

Beacon Fabrics 

Bearde's Exxon Station 

Bed & Bath 

Bernie's Formal Shop 

Big J Sandwich Shop 

Budget Rent A Car 

Burger King 

Burgin Platner & Co., Insurance 

Caesar's Restaurant 

California Disco 

Casual Concepts 

Richard 0. Chase & Co. 

Child World 

Claus Gelotte 

Colman's Sporting Goods 

Colonial 1600 Restaurant 

Copy Stop 



Creative Flowers 

Cummings 

Dental Associates of Quincy 

Dunkin Donuts 

Edson Shoe 

Eileen's Special Sizes 

Faxon Trust 

Framers Workshop 

Frantic Framer's 

Friendly Family Center 

Gile Realty Trust 

Gina's Sandwich Shop 

Gino's Barber Shop 

Good Health-Natural Foods 

A.E. Goodhue, Co. 

Goodhue, O'Brien & Co. Insurance 

Granite City Electric Supply 

Granite City Hardware 

Grossman Industrial Properties 

Hancock Bank & Trust Co. 

Hancock Tobacco 

Hanlon's Shoe Store 

Senator Paul D. Harold 

Harts Jewelry Co. . 



Import Village 

Atty. Donald M. Jackson 

Jason's Luggage & Music Shop 

Jewelry Factory Outlet 

Johnson Motor Parts 

Atty. Stephen T. Keefe, Jr. 

Kincaide's Furniture 

Kustom-Television 

Lerner Shops 

Samuel F. McCormack, Co., Inc. 

McDonald's 

Atty. James F. Mclntyre 

Marvel Shop 

T.J. Maxx, Co. 

Medical Associates 

Miller Shoes 

Miller Studio 

Montilio's Pastry Shops 

Napoli Pizzeria 

Norman's Army & Navy Store 

Old Colony Bank & Trust 

PVC 

Paluzzi Sign Advertising 

Paperama 



Patriot Ledger 

Pewter Pot 

Phase II Jewelry 

Photo Quick 

Pizza Chef 

Postal Instant Press 

Presidential Co-operative Bank 

Presidential Pub 

Atty. Joseph G. Prone 

Quincy Co-operative Bank 

Quincy Furniture 

Quincy Savings Bank 

The Quincy Sun 

QuinWell Travel 

Gerald T. Reilly & Co. 

Reliable Shoe Store 

Remick's of Quincy 

Paul Ricciardi 

Riley & Rielly Insurance 

Rite Aid Corp 

Atty. Richard Roaalin . 

Rogers Jewelry Store 

Roy's Flowers 

Ryder's of Quincy 



Sabina's Beauty Academy 
Sawyer's Campus Shop 
The Shoe Trap 
Sir Speedy Instant Print 
South Shore Army & Navy Store 
South Shore Bank 
South Shore Barber Shop 
South Shore TV & Appliance 
Stone Jewelry Co. 
Tags Furniture 
Taj Coin & Stamp Co. 
Tempo Fashions 
Train Store 
Atty. George M. Tull 
Tullio & Sons 
WJDA 

Wendys Hamburgers 
Wickens & Troupe 
F.W. Woolworth Co. 
Yankee Energy Saver 
Honorary Members: 
Mayor Arthur H. Tobin 
Councillor Daniel G. Raymondi 



Page 20A Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 198f 




MYLES STANDISH CAIRN at Squaw Rock, Squantum, across the bay from 
Boston, marks the spot where the captain of the Pilgrims landed with his party 
from Plymouth on Sept. 30, 1621, to become the first Europeans to visit Quincy's 
shores. 



City Hall 

Seat Of Government 
For 137 Years 

Daniel and Hannah French 
deeded the land to the town of 
Quincy for $1,000 with the 
stipulation that it "shall not be used 
for any other purpose than as a place 
for a Town House for the said 
Inhabitants." 

And, with a few minor 
transgressions of that vow, the solid 
structure of Quincy granite in 
Quincy Square has been just that for 
the past 137 years, the nerve center 
of government for first the town and 
then the city. 

It was in the great hall on the 
second floor that the popular John 
Quincy Adams II, grandson of a 
president of the United States, held 
forth as town moderator for many 
years and, with his brother, Charles 
Francis Adams Jr., gave informal 
direction to town affairs. 

One of the ealiest ordinances 
passed by the first City Council on 
March 8, 1889 was the adoption of 
the City Seal finblazoned with the 
four most significant dates in 
Quincy's history: 

1625, for the first settlement on 
Mount Wollaston; 1640, for its 
separation from Boston as the town 
of Braintree; 1792, for its separation 
from Braintree as the town of 
Quincy; and 1888, for its 
incorporation as a city. 




CITY HALL 

Designed by the architect 
Solomon Willard - who received 
$280 for drawing up the plans and 
superintending construction for five 
months - - the City Hall was 
completed and occupied for the first 
lime on Nov. 1. 1844. 

It cost exactly $19,1 15.93 to build, 
including 88 cents to John Briesler 
for lead to seal the chimney. 

In 1979, when a 3 1 2-story reflective 
glass addition was built behind the 
old City Hall, the cost was $1.9 
million. 



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Luncheon 11-4 p.m. 
Dinner starting at 4 p.m. 

Dining Room open Monday - Friday 



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Choice of the following: 

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Broiled Pork Chop and Potato * 3 



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Veal Cacciatore and Spaghetti 

Baked Stuffed Haddock 

1/2 Roast Chicken and Potato 



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Baked Shells 

Spaghetti and Meatballs 



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Sun 1 2 noon to 1 2 mid. 
Function Rooms Available for Six to One hundred people 

^ 526 Washington St., Quincy 472-9279 



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Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Pafe 21 A 



Moswetuset Hummock 



'Birthplace Of Massachusetts' 



The Indians saw it as a hill 
(wetuset) shaped like an arrowhead 
(mos) so they called it "Moswetuset" 
and when English tongues got 
through mangling the word it came 
out "Massachusetts," which became 
the name of the bay and then the 
state. 

The little wooded hillock near the 
junction of East Squantum St. and 
Quincy Shore Drive was once the 
seat of the sachem Chickatabot, 
who comes down through the pages 
of Quincy history as a rather pathetic 
figure. 

He was the chief of the 
Moswetuset Indians, a once great 
tribe that occupied the coast north of 
Plymouth. 

A few years before, under the 
great sachem Nanepashemet, the 
Moswetuset had been able to field 
some 3,000 warriors for a war with 
the Taratines of Maine, a war in 
which Nanepashemet was killed. 

Then came the plague 

In two years the mighty 
Moswetuset were all but wiped out. 
No more than 60 of them were left to 
till their fields on the banks of the 
Neponset River. Sachem Chicka- 
tabot fled his home on the hill in 
Wollaston and took refuge on 
Moswetuset Hummock. 

That was the situation in 1621 
when Capt. Myles Standish landed 




MOSWETUSET HUMMOCK 

from a shallop with an exploring 
party of Plymouth Pilgrims that 
included the Indian guide Squanto 
(or Tsquantum), whose name was 
given to the peninsula that stuck out 
in the bay. 

The tragic Chickatabot died not 
long after the Pilgrims' visit and he 
was succeeded as sachem by his 
son, Josiah Wampatuck, a boy who 
knew a good deal when he saw one. 

Wampatuck sold what was left of 
his virtually deserted tribal lands to a 
group of whites for 12 pounds, 10 
shillings. The lands included most of 
what is today the city of Quincy and 
the towns of Braintree, Randolph 
and Holbrook. 

Moswetuset Hummock, 
identified by a marker stone and 
maintined in its natural state, is 
open to the public. There is no 
admission charge. 



CONCEPT 
CAMERA, INC. 




Complete Photo & Darkroom Supplies 
Projector & Camera Repairs - 

Full line of Cameras & Lenses 
for those Historic Sites. 

Canon-Nikon-Olympus-Pentax-Konica 



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Camera repairs on the premises. 

Full line of Accessories 

We carry Swift brand Binoculars 



DINER'S 
CLUB 



We also have a 
large selection of Batteries 



1358 Hancock St., Quincy 
472-5006 





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RESTAURANT 



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honored. Private dining 

rooms catering to 

weddings, banquets. 

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telex ision Facilities. 
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Salad Bar 
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Page 22A Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 1981 

Josiah Quincy Homestead 



Lookout For Spying 
On British Ships 



Abigail Adams stood with her 
great uncle, Col Josiah Quincy, in a 
window of his mansion overlooking 
Wollaston Beach and watched the 
tall mast of 170 ships stand slowly 
out to sea. It was March 17, 1776. 
The British were evacuating 
Boston. 

But even in triumph there was 
tragedy. 

Aboard the departing ships were 
more than 1,000 Loyalists, 
Americans who had chosen King 
above country, and one of them was 
Abigail's cousin. Samuel Quincy, 
the Colonel's only remaining son, 
an avowed Tory. 

"I take a long farewell," his 
sister, Hannah, wrote to him for one 
last time. "Let it not be published 
that a brother of such brothers fled 
from his country. Can you expect to 
walk uprightly now? Can you take 
fire in your bosom and not be 
burned?" 

Two of Col. Josiah Quincy's sons 
had died young. Now he had no 
more. 

But there was no time for regrets. 
The work of revolution had begun. 
The second floor of the house at 
what is now 20 Muirhead St., 
Wollaston, was a lookout from 
which the 66-year-old Colonel spied 



on British ship movements for his 
friend, Gen. George Washington. 

A few months before, Col. Quincy 
watched the Royal Governor, Gen. 
Thomas Gage depart and he 
scratched on a pane of window glass 
the reminder: "Oct. 10, 1775. 
General Gage sailed for England 
with a fair wind." 

This time he remained in the 
window for three days as the British 
tall ships moved restlessly about the 
Harbor as if reluctant to leave. 
Finally, on March 20, the last of 
them passed through the roadstead 
and out to sea. 

The mansion in Wollaston 
reached full social flower under the 
aegis of the Colonel's grandson, the 
third Josiah, the "Great Mayor" of 
Boston, president of Harvard and 
Congressman, who called it 
"Tranquillia" and used it as his 
summer home. 

It was there that the Marquis de 
Lafayette visited one Sunday after- 
noon after dinner with his friend, ex 
President John Adams at the 
Adams Mansion. He carried flowers 
from the Adams garden for Mrs. 
Eliza Susan Quincy and her five 
attractive daughters. 

The house was built in 1770 by 
the old Colonel himself, the first in a 




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i r r ttt 



JOSIAH QUINCY HOMESTEAD 



line of six Josiahs. It was said that, 
while most families passed their 
line from sire to son, the Quincys 
went from 'Siah to 'Siah. 

But, while there were six Josiahs 
and innumerable Edmunds, the city 
was named for yet another member 
of the prolific family - Col. John 
Quincy, the great grandfather of 
John Quincy Adams, sixth 



president of the United States. 

The Josiah Quincy Homestead 
is open to the public from June 1 
to Oct. 15, Tuesday, Thursday, 
Saturday and Sunday from 12 
noon to 5 p.m. Visits may be 
made at other times by 
appointment. Admission is $1 for 
adults and 50 cents for children. 



Why We Pronounce 
It 'Quin-zee' 



Why do we pronounce Quincy 
"Quin-zee" when just about 
everyone else in the country refers to 
it as "Quin-see"? 

There are 19 other Quincy's in the 
U.S. but they pronounce it "Quin- 
see". 

Can they be right and we be 
wrong? 

Not according to Quincy's late city 
historian, William C. Edwards who 
never budged an inch whenever the 
argument ever came up. And it still 
comes up. 

The reason we pronounce it 
"Quin-zee" is very simple. 

"That's the way the Quincy family 
pronounced it," he used to explain. 



"The original Quincy family which 
settled here at Mount Wollaston 
pronounced it 'Quin-zee', including 
Col. John Quincy after whom 
Quincy, Mass. -the first Quincy-was 
named in 1792." 

Colonel Quincy was the great 
grandfather of sixth President John 
Quincy Adams. 

Apparently all 19 other Quincy's in 
the U.S. were named after John 
Quincy Adams. 

And, apparently the early settlers 
of those communities thought John 
Quincy pronounced it John "Quin- 
see". 

Anyway, that is how Edwards 
explained it. Seems like a sound 
argument. 



How Many Miles From Boston? 



Stone mile markers across 
Hancock Street from each other 
indicate that the traveler is both 7V4 
and 10 miles from Boston. And 
both are correct. 

The 10-mile marker was placed 
on the Old Coast Road, one of the 
oldest highways in the United 



States still in existence, which went 
from Boston to Plymouth in 1639 by 
way of inland Milton. 

The 7 1 /4-mile marker was raised 
after the first bridge over the 
Neponset River was built in 1803, 
creating the Neponset Turnpike, 
which is today Hancock St. in North 
Quincy and Wollaston. 



Tourist Information 



Maps of Quincy and published 
materials on historic sites are 
available at four locations in the 
city. 

• United First Parish Church, 
1306 Hancock St., across from 
City Hall and the Quincy Center 
MBTA Station. 

• The Quincy Historical 



Society in the old Adams 
Academy Building, 8 Adams St.. 
at the intersection of Hancock St. 

• The South Shore Chamber 
of Commerce, 36 Miller Stile Rd. 

• The President City Motel, 
853 Hancock St., Wollaston, 
across from Veterans Memorial 
Stadium. 



Thursday, July 9, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 23 A 



John Winthrop, Jr. Blast Furnace 

First Productive 
Iron Works In U.S. 



i-j 



It failed after nine years of effort 
and, since failure was anathema in a 
growing America, perhaps that is 
why the site and even the memory of 
the first commercial iron blast 
furnace in the United States was lost 
lor so long. 

It flourished, if that is the word, 
from 1644 to 1653 on the banks of the 
Mount Wollaston River (now 
Furnace Brook) in a section of Old 
Braintree called "the Woods." 

Iron was an important commodity 
in Colonial Massachusetts, 
particularly for nails and pots and 
pans. Iron utensils had to be 
imported from England, a costly 
process for the penny wise colonists. 

With this m mind, John Winthrop 
Jr., son of the governor of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony, went to 
London and formed the "Company 
of Undertakers for the Ironworks in 
New England." 

The first iron was turned out in 
1644 but young Winthrop was fired 
from his 100 pounds a year job the 
next year, to be succeeded by 
Richard Leader. The Ironworks itself 
didn't last much longer. 

The ore from which the iron was 
blasted on the banks of Furnace 
Brook was not a high quality 
product. It was bog iron from the 
nearby swamps. Making it proved to 
be more expensive than the 



imported kind. 

The Company of Undertakers 
appealed for fresh money in 1646 and 
apparently there were enough 
investors ready to send good money 
after bad because the furnace was 
still in operation in 1650 when the 
Scotch Prisoners arrived. 

The Scots were rugged 
Highlanders, soldiers in the army of 
the future King Charles II who were 
captured by Oliver Cromwell at the 
Bailie of Dunbar Cromwell shipped 
272 of them to New England as 
cheap labor in an effort to make the 
Quincy ironworks a paying 
proposition. It didn't work. 

The Company of Undertakers 
went bankrupt in 1653 and "the 
Woods" went back to the bear and 
the deer. 

Meanwhile, with the same Richard 
Leader as agent, construction began 
on a second iron works north of 
Boston in Saugus in 1646. When it 
was completed in 1650, it was 
recognized as the first integrated 
iron industry in America. 

The foundation of ironworks in 
Quincy has been restored on 
Crescent St., next to St. Mary's 
Cemetery in West Quincy. It is 
open to the public year around 24 
hours a day. There is no 
admission charge. 



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Dinner 4 PM to 10 PM 



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america's firs 
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erected'in 1644 

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Major Historical Sites 

St., Quincy Center. 

• First Parish Church, 1306 
Hancock St., Quincy Center. 

• Hancock Cemetery, 1319 49 
Hancock St., Quincy Center. 

• John Adams Birthplace, 133 
Franklin St., South Quincy. 

•John Quincy Adams 
Birthplace, 141 Franklin St., 
South Quincy. 

• Abigail Adams Cairn, off 342 
44 Franklin St., South Quincy. 

• Granite Railway, end of 
Mullin Ave., West Quincy. 

• John Winthrop Ironworks, 
61 63 Crescent St., West Quincy. 

• Col. Josiah Quincy House, 
20 Muirhead St., Wollaston. 

• Moswetuset Hummock, 445 
East Squantum St., North 
Quincy. 



There are 13 major historical 
sites in Quincy, as many if not 
more than any other city of similar 
size in the United States. 

They range from the 
birthplaces of two Presidents to 
the nation's first commercial 
railroad to the place from which 
Massachusetts got its name. 

All of them are open to summer 
visitors at various times, most of 
them without admission charge. 

The sites and their locations 
are: 

• Adams Mansion National 
Historic Site, 135 Adams St., 
Quincy Center. 

• Dorothy Quincy Homestead, 
34 Butler Rd., Quincy Center. 

• Adams Academy, 8 Adams 




Completely 
Remodeled 



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579- "outhern Artery 
Quincy, Massachusetts 

472-2845 



Page 24 A Quinc> Sun Thursday. July 9, 1981 



wmmammmmmmmmm 



AS MUCH A PART 

OF QUINCY AS 



JOHN 



Since our namesake was the 
first Governor of this state, it's 
fitting that we should be 
historically minded . . . and 
community minded. 
Hancock Bank . . . named after 
our first Governor, president of 
the Continental Congress, the 
first signature on the Declaration 
of Independence and one of 
Quincy's most celebrated 
citizens. As the city of Quincy 



HANCO 




NCOCK 



grows and prospers, so does 

the Hancock Bank. We have 

16 branch offices (five in 

Quincy) and offer a full range 

of banking services . . . 

checking, savings and NOW 

accounts plus loans to 

businesses and individuals. 

Come into any of our branches 

and let us tell you more about 

the bank that named itself after 

John Hancock. 



BANK 



1495 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 



Member FDIC 




South Shore 773-0500 
mid-county 769-1300 

equal opportunity employ. r 



J 




ELEVEN OF THE 29 contestants in the Miss Quincy Bay Beauty Pageant strike a 
traditional pose on a seawall in preparation for the pageant to be held Friday at 9:30 p.m. in 
front of Hancock Bank, Quincy Square. From left, are Ann C. Reilly, 19, South Weymouth; 
Patricia A. Kane, 20, Hull; Linda E. Petersen, 21, Quincy; Kathleen A. O'Malley, 22, 



Braintree; Dawn A. MacLeod, 16, Quincy; Laura M. Noenickx, 20, Quincy; Jill M. Bodell, 
23, South Weymouth; Patricia M. Saxonis, 17, Milton; Donna A. Beady, 17, North 
Weymouth; Cynthia A. Woomer, 20, Brockton; and Michelle A. Roosa, 19, Randolph. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dave Gillooly) 





Vol. 13 No. 42 



Thursday, July 16, 1981 




Tobin Halts Payment 

^Conflict' Seen In 
School Summer Jobs 



$3 Million State 
Aid For City? 



By TOM HENSHAW 

Mayor Arthur H. Tobin 
has ordered payment halted 
to 16 young people hired by 
the School Department for a 
summer work program, 
including four identified as 
relatives of members of the 

School Committee. 

The Mayor said he learned of 
the program Monday afternoon 
and consulted with City Solicitor 
Robert Fleming who advised him 
to halt payment in view of the 
"appearance of conflict of 
interest." 

School Supt. Dr. Lawrence P. 



Creedon said the 16 young men 
and women were hired "as a 
standard practice" to help remove 
furniture and other equipment 
from five schools being closed. 

They were to be paid $3.95 a 
hour. 

The four who were identified as 
relatives of School Committee 
members were: 

John Toland, son of Commit- 
teewoman Patricia Toland; 
Suzanne Picard, daughter of 
Committeewoman Joan Picard; 
Patricia Sullivan, daughter of 
Committeeman John J. Sullivan; 
and John Sullivan, his grandson. 

Mrs. Toland, the only one of tht 



three who was available for 
comment Tuesday, said that "if 
there is a conflict of interest, then 
my son will be withdrawn. It's no 
big deal." 

"The School Department has 
hired young people to work on 
summer programs for as long as 
I've been on the School 
Committee," she said. 'There is a 
lot of work to be done and 
someone has to do it. 

"Over the years, I've had many 
kids call me to get on the summer 
programs. My son has been 
bugging me for two years to get a 
job when he was old enough. This 
(Cont'd on Pant- 24) 



Quincy could get a little over $3 
million in additional state aid if the 
new overall $6.3 billion state 
budget passes the Legislature, as 
expected, and is signed by Gov. 
Edward J. King. 

Word from the State House is 
that the $3 million is virtually 
certain but Mayor Arthur H. 
Tobin said he would prefer to wait 
and see it in writing. 

"We are trying to pin it down," 
he said. "We don't know what 
formula they will use. If it is the 
same as last year, we can figure it. 
But we hear rumors it may be 
different." 

"If we get $3 million in aid it 
would solve our problems. We 
would be able to balance the 
budget in compliance with Prop. 
2'/2. We would be in good shape." 

The state budget also contains a 



$120,000 grant for Quincy Junior 
College out of the $3 million 
appropriated for the Bay State 
Skills Corp. The original budget 
request was for $200,000. 

City Councillor James A. 
Sheets, who is a teacher at the 
junior college and a former 
legislator, said QJC has already 
raised the required $120,000 in 
matching funds. 

Rep. Michael W. Morrisseysaid 
the $120,000 was "not as much as 
we would have liked for the Junior 
College but we're happy with it. 
Another $100,000 would have 
been nice." 

"We have had a lot of successes 
in this legislature," he added. "First 
the revolving accounts for the 
Hospital and the Junior College 
and now this. I feel we're batting 99 
per cent." 




AND 1 1 MORE- Miss Quincy Bay Beauty Pageant contestants, from left, are Jacquelyn A. 
Babcock, 21, Hull; Diane M. West, 18, Brockton; Dawna A. Stitt, 17, Scituate; Cynthia J. 
Davies, 17, Braintree; Donna Sampson, 28, Marshfield; Teresa M. Charron, 16, Weymouth; 



Beth G. Garvin, 18, Braintree; Jean L. Zdankowski, 19, North Quincy; Karen M. Corliss, 17, 
Quincy; Deborah M. Campanale, 18, Braintree; Stephanie A. Petz, 21, Quincy. 

putney -Sun Photo by Dare (iUlooly) 



J 






P«ge 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16. 1981 




Wirh rhe price of gold, silver and diamonds at 

highest for even declining) levels, now is the 

time to receive the most cash for yours 

We've been serving Quincy and the 
Soufh Shore since 1942. 



WATERMELON EATING CONTEST was part of the Ward 2 Civic Association's field day July 4, at Fore 
River Field. Jason Lefleur, front center, wasn't sure if he was too hungry, but others eagerly digging into the 
watermelon were, from left, back, Shannon McCarthy, Katy McCarthy, Frank Curtis, Theresa LaFleur and 
Elizabeth Gonzalez. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dare Gillooly) 

Judge Kramer ^Recovering Nicely' 
From Triple Bypass Heart Surgery 




(ewelers 

1 402 Hancock street • Quincy. Mass. 02 1 60 

773-3636 

Open Thursday until 9 



Judge Albert Kramer, presiding 
justice of Quincy District Court, is 
reported as "coming along very 
nicely" following triple bypass 
heart surgery he underwent June 
23, at Mass. General Hospital. 

According to his secretary, 
Joyce Aronson, Kramer, 48, was 
released from the hospital over the 
July 4, week-end and is making 
"very good progress." 

She said the surgery involved 



taking arteries from Kramer's legs 
and using them in his heart to 
bypass clogged arteries. 

The surgery was a preventative 
measure, according to Miss 
Aronson, who explained that 
Kramer had experienced angina 
pain but not a heart attack. 

Miss Aronson said she spoke to 
Kramer Tuesday and that he had a 
"great attitude" and was walking a 
half mile a dav. 



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Though not expected back to 
work until October, Kramer is 
already writing articles at home, 
said Miss Aronson. 

"He won't be out that long," said 
Miss aronson who continued that 
Kramer would probably be back 
sooner on a limited basis. 

"He's very energetic," said the 
secretary. 

In Kramer's absence. Judge 
Lewis Whitman is acting presiding 
justice of the court. 

O'Leary At 

MBTA Fare 

Hike Hearing 

James F. O'Leary, the MBTA's 
general manager himself, will be 
on hand Monday, July 20, at 7:30 
p.m. in City Hall at a public 
hearing into the M BT A's proposed 
fare increases. 

The proposed rate changes 
would raise the basic rapid transit 
fare from 50 cents to 75 cents, with 
a round trip from Quincy Center to 
Boston going from $1.50 to $2.25. 

Fares from Wollaston and 
North Quincy would remain the 
same. 

Basic bus fares would be 
increased from the present 25 cents 
to 50 cents with zones established 
on distance travelled. The base fare 
would be for the First six miles, 
with an additional 25 cents for 
each additional three miles. 

The fare increases would take 
effect Aug. I , pending approval by 
the MBTA's Board of Directors 
and Advisory Board. 

Tot's Dental 
Program At 
Lincoln-Hancock 

A four-day Mother's and Tot's 
Dental Health Awareness 
Program will start Monday, July 
27, at the Lincoln-Hancock 
Community School. Classes will 
be held from 10 a.m. to 1 1 a.m. 

Youngsters will learn the basics 
of caring for their teeth, including 
how and why flossing is 
necessary. They will also learn to 
distinguish a good snack from a 
bad. 

For further information, call the 
Expanded Food and Nutrition 
Education Program office at 205 
Beale St., Wollaston, or 479-6056. 
The program is free. 



Thursday, July 16, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 3 



King Signs Bills 



^Independence Day' 

For Hospital, 

Junior College 



By TOM HENSHAW 

"I am happy," said Gov. 
Edward J. King with a nod to the 
200 or so people who jammed the 
City Council chamber, "to- 
recognize people who are helping 
themselves and their city. 

"What Proposition 2'/j is 
saying is let's have more free 
enterprise like this for the cities 
and towns." 

And with that he signed the 
bills that make City Hospital and 
Quincy Junior College inde- 
pendent of the city budget by 
giving them revolving enterprise 
accounts of their own. 

"These are," said Rep. 
Michael W. Morrissey, "the two 
most important pieces of legis- 
lation I have worked on in my five 
years in the State Legislature." 

Everyone had nice things to say 
about the two bills, which became 
effective retroactively on July 1, 
the start of the 1982 fiscal year. 

Christopher F. Kennedy, vice 
chairman of the School 
Committee which has supervision 
of the Junior College, called it "a 
beacon in the dusty, murky sea of 
Proposition 2Vt." 

"Quincy Junior College has 
now come of age," said Supt. Dr. 
Lawrence P. Creedon. "It is 
established. It is accredited. It is 
valued by the community. It has 
the support of city and state 
officials and now it has the 



machinery for making itself self- 
supporting." 

"This will greatly strengthen 
Quincy City Hospital," said 
Donald Strange, regional ad- 
ministrator for Hospital Corp. of 
America, which operates the 
hospital for the city. 

"Now that we are self- 
supporting, we can achieve a new 
level of health service to the 
people of Quincy and the South 
Shore." 

Others who spoke on the brief 
Thursday morning program in the 
sweltering Council chamber were 
Sen. Paul D. Harold, Council 
President Leo J. Kelly and Mayor 
Arthur H. Tobin, who called it "a 
historic moment. " 

Also present for the signing 
were Rep. Elizabeth Metayer of 
Bra in tree and Rep. Mary 
Jeanette Murray of Cohasset, 
both of whom helped to push the 
bills through a sometimes 
reluctant Legislature. 

"I don't usually favor revolving 
accounts," said Mrs. Murray, 
"but these are very important 
and essential to maintaining a 
school and a hospital that are 
needed by the whole South 
Shore." 

After the signing, Gov. King 
passed out commemorative pens 
to members of the City Council, 
the School Committee and the 
Quincy legislative delegation. 



Fore River Clubhouse 
To Remain Open A Year 



The Fore River Clubhouse will 
remain open for another year 
under funding from the 
Community Development Block 
Grant, announces City Councillor 
Daniel G. Raymondi. 

The clubhouse, which is used as 
a community center for the Quincy 
Point area, was in danger of 
closing permanently under the 
budget cutbacks of Proposition 

"The Fore River Clubhouse is a 
very important asset to the 



residents of our community and 
every effort must be made to make 
certain that it remains open," said 
Raymondi. 

The Club house historically has 
been one of the most extensively 
used public buildings in the city, 
serving the needs of both the young 
people and the seniors of our area." 

Activities that have been 
temporarily displaced from the 
Clubhouse or terminated will be 
reactivated to serve the 
neighborhood. 



BE A 

CLEANER 

SLEEPER 




SHEETS, BEDSPREADS, BLANKETS 
PILLOWCASES, SLEEPING BAGS 



incoming orders 
through July 30 




EAST MILTON: 551 Adams St HINGHAM: 298 M».n St & Rtt. 228 
QUINCY: 27 Adami St 581 Adams St. 624 Hancock St 
WEYMOUTH: 242 Washington St. COHASSET: 66 South Main St 




GOV. EDWARD J. KING visited Quincy to sign bills creating independent revolving accounts for City 
Hospital and Quincy Junior College. Left to right, Rep. Michael W . Morrissey, Gov. King, Mayor Arthur 
H. Tobin, Sen. Paul D. Harold, Council President Leo J. Kelly, Rep. Thomas F. Brownell and Hospital 
Director Michael Kitchen. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dare Gillooly) 

Starts Thursday 

Sidewalk Bazaar 
3 Days Of Fun, Good Buys 



It will be fun and games and 
shopping values starting today at 
the 12th annual downtown Quincy 
Sidewalk Bazaar, sponsored by 
the Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association. 

From today (Thursday) through 
Saturday night Hancock St. will 
be closed to vehicular traffic and 
become a pedestrian mall with 35 
booths plus mercantile displays, 
wandering minstrels and shows. 

The main event will be the 
selection and coronation Friday 
night of Miss Quincy Bay of 1981, 
who will reign over Quincy Bay 
Race Week in August. 

Last year's winner, Tracy Hart 
of Quincy, will crown her 
successor in the pageant, which 
will be held on a portable board- 
walk in front of the Hancock 
Bank, starting at 9:15 p.m. 

A special treat this year will be 
the appearance of an old 
fashioned organ grinder, Bob 
Delvental of West Roxburv. with 



his monkey and 135-year-old 
organ. 

Other features of the three days 
of festivity include: 

• Paco the Clown, whose fun- 
filled half hour show includes 
balloon sculpturing, magic, a 
balancing act and a spoof of clown 
shows. He also strolls through the 
crowd, entertaining the young. 

• Dario, Olof and Eddie G., 
whose three-person act includes 
magic and juggling, audience 
participation and live animals. 

• The Moonwalk, a huge 
balloon filled loosely with air, 
which, to youngsters bouncing 
and struggling on its surface, 
closely approximates conditions 
on the Moon. 

• Baron Hugo, famed band 
leader from the days of the Big 
Bands, and his orchestra will 
perform Friday night and for the 
Miss Quincy Bay Pageant. 

• The Burger King Magic 



Show, in which youngsters from 
the audience will be invited up to 
help the King with magic tricks, 
is back as well as the Hamburglar 
of MacDonald's fame. 

• Quincy's Young World 
Exhibition will perform their 
gymnastics and Big Bird, direct 
from Sesame Street, will wander 
through the crowd as a roving 
troubador. 

* There will also be a dunking 
stool; Valerie Kaan, the ventrilo- 
quist; Cheezo the Clown; the 
Milton Band; the Joy of Move- 
ment Dancers; and Sea Bright, 
Quincy's own musical group, 
autographing records. 

On a serious note, the Quincy 
Eye Association will have a booth 
in front of the QCBPA office for a 
clinic to test visitors of color 
blindness, depth perception and a 
general eye examination. 

The eye tests are particularly 
geared to children. 



' 



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Other Shops also in Marshfiald, Hoibrook. 

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Pige 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16. 1981 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1372 HaneOck St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

15c Per Copy - $7.00 Per Year - Out of State $10.00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

POSTMASTER: Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St. 

Quincy. Mass. 02169 

Member New England Press Association 



The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that 
part of an advertisement in which the typographical error 
occurs. 



WM? 



CNA Insurance Co. 
To Locate In N. Quincy 



There is a possibility," said 
Mayor Arthur H. Tobin, "that 
Quincy is building a reputation in 
the insurance industry. We have 
Kemper, Commercial Union and 
now CNA." 

CNA, the Chicago-based 
insurance giant, was scheduled to 
sign a lease yesterday (Wednesday) 
on half of the so-called Italian 
building at 100 Newport Ave., 
North Quincy. 

The building, which is located 
just outside the State Street South 
complex, was built by the SCI 
Investment Corp. of Genoa, Italy, 
at a cost of $4.5 million. 

Nearhv in State Street South is 



the headquarters of the Kemper 
Insurance Co. and the former 
Monarch I Building, which now 
houses the Commercial Union 
Insurance Co. 

"It speaks well for Quincy," said 
Tobin. "The word is out to the 
other insurance companies. Three 
have moved in and they are happy 
with it. 

"This is another result of our 
strong economic development 
program. In the past V/i years we 
have taken a city that was $7 
million in the red and had no 
programs and turned it around. 

"It's quite an accomplishment." 



Housing Authority 
Hears Budgets Report 



Accountant John S. Sullivan 
was scheduled to report on the 
status of the 1981-82 budgets at a 
meeting of the Quincy Housing 
Authority last night (Wednesday). 

The meeting was set for 5:30 
p.m. at the authority office, 80 
Clav St.. Wollaston. 



Among the other items on the 
agenda were reports on 
modernization at Westacres, 
petition for Local 1990 for fact 
finding with State Board of 
Arbitrator, and TV antennas at 
Germantown. 



$129,888 Federal Grant 
To So Shore Mental Health 



The South Shore Mental Health 
Center has been awarded a 
$129,888 federal grant to support 
"Project Optimus" for handi- 



capped children for the coming 
year, it was announced by Cong. 
Brian J. Donnelly. 




umcy 




uiz 



Only one winner in the Quincy Quiz this week. 

Tommy Cosseboom, 48 Greene St., Wollaston, wins a T-shirt. 

Each week two Quincy Sun T-shirts and two Quincy Sun 
bumper stickers are offered as prizes in the Quincy Quiz. 

The first two readers (one a mail subscriber) to submit to the 
Sun office in writing the correct answers to the week's five 
questions receive T-shirts. The next two receive bumper stickers. 

One person in each home is eligible to compete in any one week 
and no person is eligible to win more than three T-shirts. 

This week's Quincy Quiz: 

1. What is the name of the principal of North Quincy High 
School? 

2. What Quincy landmark is located at 2 Washington St.? 

3. In what section of the city is the Quincy Youth Hockey 
Arena? 

4. True or false: Contestants in the Miss Quincy Bay Pageant 
are limited to girls from Quincy only. 

5. City Hall was built in 1792? 1844: 1889? 
Answers to last week's Quincy Quiz: 

1. John Sullivan, Mary Collins and Joan Picard are the 
members of the Quincy School Committee who are up for re- 
election this year. 

2. The Quincy Point Congregational Church is located at 444 
Washington St., Quincy Point. 

3. True. Central Junior High School occupies the old Quincy 
High School building. 

4. Herbert Blake is Quincy 's superintendent of public buildings. 

5. John Adams of Quincy was president of the United States 
from 1797 to 1801. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Dennis Ryan: A Special Person 




RYAN 



Dennis Ryan was a scrapper all his life. 

He never backed down to anyone no matter 
how big they were physically, financially or 
politically. He didn't know 
how to spell the word quit. 
And whatever project/or job 
he did, he put not only his 
energy and enthusiasm into it, 
but his heart and soul, too. 

Denny waged a long, tough 
battle with cancer and won 
quite a few rounds. But last week, when he 
wasn't looking, the Big C sneaked one by him. 

Denny wasn't looking because — despite his 
illness — he was turning his attention to this 
year's mayoral race. 

He had assumed the general chairmanship of 
Dan Raymondi's mayor campaign committee 
and, typically Denny, was gearing up to throw 
all the energy he could muster into it. 

During his three decades as clerk-magistrate 
at Quincy District Court, Denny had helped 
many young lawyers get the feel of the 
courtroom and actually helped some get their 
careers started. Raymondi is one of them. 

Denny also steered a future judge in the right 
direction. 

Henry Chmielinski was selling law books 
when he and Denny became good friends. 
Chmielinski had graduated from law school 
several years before but had never gotten around 
to taking the bar exam. Denny talked him into 
taking a refresher course and the exam. 
Chmielinski passed the bar and today, of course, 
is one of the state's most respected superior court 
judges. 

They remained close 
friends and admired one 
another. A saddened Judge 
Chielinski said, in sincere 
tribute: 

"In my opinion, Dennis 

Ryan was one of the finest 

CHMIELINSKI and humane people I have 

ever come across in my life. The community has 

suffered a tremendous loss. I just loved this 

man." 

So did a lot of people. He touched the lives of 
so many. 

As a lawyer, clerk-magistrate, a member of the 
School Committee and board of managers at 
Quincy City Hospital, Denny gave his all. And, 
during those many years of community service, 
he was a champion of the 'little guy". 

He did a lot of favors for a lot of people. He 
could do things to help someone in need of a 
friend — things no one else seemed to be able to 
do. 

Denny sometimes liked you to think he was 
gruff. But then his big Irish heart and Denny 




Ryan grin would give him away. 

His heart was big. Just a few weeks ago more 
than 800 turned out to honor him upon his 
retirement as clerk-magistrate. Nearly $5,000 
was presented him that night. Denny turned it all 
over to the Sidney Farber Cancer Institute. 

Last May, Judge Albert R. Kramer, presiding 
justice of Quincy District Court, passed along to 
him the honor of giving the Law Day address at 
the court. 

There were tears that morning because this 
was Denny's final Law Day as clerk-magistrate. 
And some feared it might be his final Law Day. 
They were right. 

Denny learned to roll with the punches of life. 
Even though he never got to be a judge as he 
would have liked, he didn't let it get him down. 
He should have been appointed to the bench. 
He would have been a good judge 
compassionate, fair, but forceful. Justice would 
have triumphed but the defendant and the 
complainant both would have gotten a fair 
shake. 

The black robe just wasn't there for him. His 
friends thought he got cheated. But he didn't 
complain. 

Whatever life dished out, he could take. And, 
did. No alibis, no crybabying. 

So he didn't become a judge. So what, really. 
He became something much more important 
in life. 

He became a successful human being. 
Not many people do. 
□ 
FR. DANIEL GRAHAM, associate pastor of 
St. John's Church suffered a 
fractured vertabra in a 
boating mishap on Lake 
Winnipesaukee, N.H. He is a 
patient at Carney Hospital 
and coming along nicely. He 
will be sidelined awhile. 

Here's wishing you a 
speedy recovery, Father. 

□ 
ANOTHER ENTRY IS expected in the City 
Council-at-large race. Atty. William O'Hare, 27, 
of Hamden Circle, Wollaston will be officially 
making an announcement soon — probably 
next week. He's the son of Fire Capt. Frank 
O'Hare. This will be his first bid for elective 
office. 

□ 
MARY JO RILEY, former coordinator of 
Quincy community schools, was guest of honor 
at a farewell reception Wednesday night (5-7 
p.m.) at the Quincy Neighborhood Club. She is 
taking a two year leave of absence from the 
School Department and will soon leave for San 
Diego. Senator Paul Harold picked up the tab 
for the reception. 




FR. GRAHAM 



QCH To Present Dr. Frist Award 



City Hospital Director Michael 
D. Kitchen announces the 
establishment of the Dr. Frist 
Humanitarian Award to be given 
to a hospital employee who has 
demonstrated exceptional service 
to the hospital and its patients. 

Dr. Thomas F. Frist Jr. is one 
of the founders and current 
president of the Hospital Corp. of 
America (HCA), the management 
firm that has operated City 
Hospital since last January. 

The first Frist award will be 
given this year. 

The w.nner need not work in 
the area of direct patient care but 
should have made an 
extraordinary contribution to 
patient welfare and satisfaction, 
and be one whose day-to-day 
performance is dependable, 
consistent and people oriented. 

Every full-time employee at 
City Hospital is eligible and the 
winner will be eligible for 
divisional and a national award. 



The Quincy winner will receive 
a check for $250 and an engraved 
trophy from Director Kitchen. 

Division winners receive a 
$1,000 check while the national 
winner will receive HCA stock 



valued at $2,500 as well as an all 
expense paid trip to Nashville, 
Tenn. 

The contest will run through 
the month of August. 



Human Rights Coalition 
Annual Picnic Sunday 



The annual picnic of the South 
Shore Coalition for Human Rights 
will be held jointly with the 
Randolph Fair Practices 
Committee Sunday, I p.m.todusk 
at Cedar Hill Conference Center, 
Duxbury. 

The public is invited to attend. 
Participants should bring beach 
paraphernalia as well as lunch for 
themselves and to share. 

The conference center has its 
own private beach as well as space 
for games such as tug of war, three 
legged race and wheelbarrow run. 



In case of rain, a large house is 
available with cooking facilities. 

Coalition members will meet at 
12:30 p.m. at Quincy Centre 
United Methodist Church to form 
a caravan to Duxbury. 

For more information, call the 
coalition office at 472-3396. 



NEWSCARRIERS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



"One of the more important 
functions the mayor of Quincy 
performs," said City Councillor 
Francis X. McCauley, "is serving 
as chairman of the School 
Committee." 

McCauley, a candidate for 
mayor, outlined his 20-year 
involvement in school affairs in a 
recent talk before a group of 
retired educators. 

He noted that, since he is the 
father of five children, all of whom 
attended the Quincy Public 
Schools, he has been committed to 
bettering the Quincy School 
system. He has been active in 
parent-teacher affairs, having 
served both as president of his 
local PTA and as a member of the 
citywide parent-teacher organisa- 
tion. 

Elected to the school committee 
in 1971, McCauley served for six 



McCauley Cites Important 
School Functions Of Mayor 



Thursday, July 16, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 5 



years. During his tenure on the 
committee, he visited each school 
to observe first-hand the 
educational process. 

He pointed out that he 
successfully sponsored a number 
of rules changes that gave the 
school committee more informa- 
tion and greater control over 
school spending practices. One of 
them was the requirement that at 
year-end, school administrators 
would have to receive school 
committee approval before 
transferring funds within the 
department. 

As a member of the school 
committee, McCauley said his 
concern and interest extended to 
the individual student in the 
Quincy school system. He initiated 
the practice of issuing Certificates 
of Merit semi-annually to each 
student who attained distinction 



and honors. 

In 1976, McCauley sponsored 
legislation that allowed 
cooperative banks to grant 
scholarships to high school and 
junior college graduates. 

Since the bill was signed into law 
1976, Quincy area cooperative 
banks have awarded thousands of 
dollars in scholarships to Quincy 
high schools and Quincy Junior 
College graduates. 

"I am very proud to be a member 
of the group who saw the need for 
local scholarships for worthy 
students and who worked to see 
that these yearly awards by local 
cooperative banks would be made 
possible," he said. 

McCauley pledged that, if 
elected mayor, he would attend all 
school committee meeetings and 
be actively involved in school 
department affairs. 



Raymondi Lauds Hospital, 
QJC Revolving Accounts 



The establishment of revolving 
accounts for City Hospital and 
Quincy Junior College are 
"excellent means to address the 
constraints of Proposition 2V4 in 
Quincy," says City Councillor 
Daniel G. Raymondi, a candidate 
for mayor. 

"The passage of these bills 
ensures future economic stability 
for City Hospital and the Junior* 
College," he said, citing his support 
for both measures. 

Raymondi spoke on the hospital 
and junior college at a recent coffee 



party held in the home of John and 
Dorothy Henshall, 246 Fayette 
St., Wollaston. 

"The actions taken at the State 
House and the subsequent signing 
of the bills here in Quincy by Gov. 
Edward J. King guarantees not 
only financial institutional 
soundness," said Raymondi, "but 
they also free the institutions from 
political involvement in their 
operations. 

"City Hospital and the Junior 
College can now function with a 
sense of independence from undue 



political influence." 

Calling the new legislation 
"critical" for Quincy's future 
economic well being, Raymondi 
said, "The bills offer us a 
continuation of services and 
propsects of growth in the city's 
hospital and fine junior college. 

"Quincy can now entera newera 
regarding these fine institutions. 
Both will continue to flourish with 
bright futures in providing the city 
with much needed health and 
educational services at no cost to 
the taxpayer." 



Toland Urges New Auditor Be Named 



Patricia Toland, a candidate for 
an at-large seat on the City 
Council, has urged Council 
President Leo J. Kelly to 
reconsider his decision to postpone 
selection of a newcity auditor until 
October. 

Kelly announced last week that 
a successor to retired auditor 
Charles L. Shea will be withheld 
while the city is undergoing an 
outside audit and a new 
accounting system is being 
installed. 



"It would seem," said Mrs. 
Toland in a letter to Kelly, "the 
best interests of the city may be 
better served if the decision on who 
is to fill the position were not 
delayed since this is the beginning 
of the new fiscal year which is 
bringing so many changes with it. 

"For the very reason that the 
new compulsory state accounting 
system for municipalities will be 
implemented over the next few 
months, it would seem consistent 
with good business practice and 
fiscal management to name the 



person who eventually will have to 
familiarize himself with the new 
system. 

"In addition, the process of 
setting the tax rate will be set in 
motion soon and since 100 percent 
valuation and reclassification are 
new factors in that process this 
year, it would seem appropriate 
that the permanent auditor's input 
would be essential." 

William Grindlay has been 
acting auditor since Shea's 
retirement in March. 



QCAO Taking Applications For Heat Aid 



Applications are being taken by 
the Quincy Community Actior 
Organization Energy Office from 
those eligible renters who did not 
receive assistance to pay for heat 
between Oct. I, 1979 and June 30, 
1980. 

Thanks to a lawsuit, the state 



now has $2 million to distribute to 
income eligible renters who did not 
receive payments because of 
problems with the state plan or 
because landlords were unwilling 
to sign agreements. 

The program is now called the 
Reopened Energy Crisis 



Assistance Program (RECAP). 

Applications will be taken 
Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 
3 p.m., until July 31 at the Energy 
Office, 28 Phipps St.. Quincy. 



Connector Hearing July 23 

The State Public Works 
Department will hold a public 
hearing Thursday, July 23, at 4:30 
p.m. in City Hall on plans for a 



proposed East- West (Revere Rd.) 
Connector through downtown 
Quincy. 




Jenjamin Franklin was 
the first head of the 
U.S. postal system. 




Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

By Tom Henshaw 




July 16-22 

1959 

22 Years Ago 
This Week 



Council, Mayor 

At Odds Over 

Planning Director 

Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa announced he will seek a full-time, 
college-trained professional planner to succeed Regis J. 
Harrington as City Planning Director. 

Harrington resigned from the post, 
which pays $7,750 a year plus a $540 
automobile allowance, for a better 
paying job in Medford. 

The City Courtcil was divided on the 
future of the head of the Planning 
Department with Councillors Joseph E. 
Brett and James R. Mclntyre in favor of 
combining the job with that of City Engineer. 

Mclntyre called the full-time planner "a luxury we can't afford." 
"The whole concept of employing out of town experts has its 
roots in the Plan E philosophy that Quincy people are inherently 
incapable of running their own government," he said. 

City Councillors David S. Mcintosh, Edna B. Austin and 
Charles L. Shea were opposed to the abolition of the post of 
Planning Director. 

XWAY HYSTERICS' HIT 
Peter V. Bille, captain of the MDC's Old Colony Division, 
branded as "prematurely hysterical" newspaper reports that the 
new Southeast Expressway between Boston and the South Shore 
was unsafe. 

An average of 65,000 cars a day used the superhighway in the 
first 17 days that it was open, he said, and there were only 13 
accidents reported. 

WEST-OF-TRACKS DEVELOPMENT 
Mayor Delia Chiesa said he will present the $700,000 so-called 
West-of-the-Tracks development to the City Council in 
November "and let the Council kick it around for a while." 

The plans call for widening Granite St. underpass and 
extending Whitwell St. across Granite and into the Ross Parking 
area by way of an underpass under the Old Colony railroad 
tracks. 

PONY STARS WIN 
John Rintamaki pitched a five-hitter, struck out 12 and hit a 
two-run homer and two singles to lead the Quincy Pony League 
All Stars to a 5-1 victory over Waltham in the district playoffs. 

QUINCY-ISMS 
Welfare Commissioner Anthony Venna reported that the 
Quincy United Fund had turned down a request for financial 
support by the Council on Aging . . . Robert L. Blair of Wollaston, 
vice president of the South Shore National Bank, spoke on "The 
Business Outlook" at the Quincy Rotary Club luncheon at the 
Neighborhood Club . . . Swordfish was 39 cents a pound at the 
Stop and Shop on Southern Artery . . . Explorer Scout Clifton E. 
Lawson of Squantum was among 12,000 attending the 10th 
World Scout Jamboree on Mt. Makiling near Manila in the 
Philippines . . . Mike Johnson's eight-hitter led Quincy Junior 
Legion baseball team to a 6-3 win over Wollaston and a tie for 
fourth place in Zone 6 . . . Atty. Charles N. Ross of Quincy, 
assistant register of deeds for Norfolk County was named trustee 
of the Chinese Christian Church of New England . . . Some 235 
youngsters from West and North Quincy were guests of Rep. 
Joseph E. Brett at a Red Sox-White Sox doubleheader, watched 
Quincy's Dick Donovan win the first game for Chicago . . . Paul 
Ricciardi was general chairman of the Quincy Granite 
Manufacturers annual outing at Commonwealth Country Club in 
Newton . . . "South Pacific," starring Rossano Brazzi and Mitzie 
Gaynor, was playing at the Strand . . . The work of William Eng, 
the Quincy artist just back from 13 months of study in Europe, 
was being shown at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts . . . Dr. 
Joseph P. Leone, director, announced that the new $2,250,000 
addition to City Hospital would open officially Nov. 15 . . . Robert 
and Ralph Pearson, twin sons of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Pearson, 71 
Turner St., Houghs Neck, completed specialist training at Ft. 
Dix, N.J., and were assigned to Ft. Campbell. Ky. . . . The lobster 
dinner was $1.50 at Smart's Lobster Kettle, 571 Southern Artery. 
. . Councillor Shea announced that he will run for a third term on 
the City Council from Ward I . . . Col. Charles W. Hedges and 
Master Sgt. Thomas Hurlebaus were on two weeks active duty 
with the Massachusetts National Guard at Otis Air Force Base on 
the Cape ... It was reported that Joseph P. Campobasso. 46 
Dimmock St., Quincy Center, will be reappointed to the State 
Board of Registration for Barbers by Gov. Foster Furcolo . . . 
Marilyn Dixon won the only victory as the Quincy Tennis Club 
bowed to New Bedford, 6-1, for its first loss in three starts ... The 
U.S. House passed a bill, sponsored by Cong. James A. Burke, 
that would authorize a feasibility study of the proposed 40-mile 
President Adams National Parkway from Boston to Plymouth . . . 
The newsletter of the Quincy Taxpayers Association urged a self- 
supporting rapid transit line as the best possible solution for the 
Old Colony commuter problem . . . Sacco was at the piano at 
Louis Cafe, 1269 Sea St., Houghs Neck. 



Pace 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 1981 




ENGAGED - Mr. John R. Spanks, Jr. of Wollaston announces the 
engagement of his daughter, Holly Ruth, to Edward H. Hutchinson, 
HI, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Hutchinson Jr., of Falmouth, 
formerly of Hingham. Miss Spanks, also the daughter of the late Mrs. 
Zoa H. Spanks, is a graduate of North Quincy High School and 
Northeastern University College of Nursing. She is employed at 
Children 's Hospital Medical Center. Mr. Hutchinson attended 
Proctor Academy and is a graduate of Hingham High School. He is 
employed by New England Sealcoating. A Sept. 12, wedding is 
planned. 

[Blackwell Studio] 

Mr., Mrs. Dennis R. Corcoran 



Parents Of Daughter 



Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. 
Corcoran of West Quincy are 
parents of a daughter, Heidi 
Marie, their first child, born May 
7, at Mount Auburn Hospital, 
Cambridge. 



Mrs. Corcoran is the former 
Mary Kavolis. 

Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Francis B. Corcoran of 
Somerville. 



Ralph H. Golding, a.c.s.w., l.i.cs.w. 

Massachusetts Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker 

Psychotherapist 
44 Greenleaf Street 472-8661 

Quincy Center 331-5058 

Management of 

Family Conflicts • Separation • Drinking 

Drug Use • Depression • Emotional Tensions 

Stress • Anxiety • Crises 

Individual, Couple. Family, Marital & Group Therapy 
On site Parking Evening & Weekend Hours Available 



Did you get your passport photo 
at Bay Colony Travel Agency? 



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Hours: 8:30-6:00 Daily 
Thurs. & Fri. til 9 



Darcilyn L. Mack Wed To Donald F. Cameron 



Darcilyn L. Mack and Donald 
F. Cameron were married recently 
in the Francis Park Rose Gardens 
in Lansing, Mich. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Leslie Mack of Haslett 
Mich. She was recently graduated 
from Portland State University 
with a degree in business 



administration. 

The bridegroom, son of Mrs. 
Kathleen L. Cameron of 
Wollaston and the late Mr. 
Lawrence F. Cameron, was 
graduated from North Quincy 
High School. He is a programmer 
analyst in the Pacific Power and 
Light Company, Portland, Ore. 



Maid of honor was Marianna 
Mack of Michigan. Best man was 
Alan Mann of Wollaston. 

A reception was held at 'Jim's 
Tiffany Place' in Lansing. 

Following a wedding trip to the 
Virgin Islands and Boston, the 
newlyweds are making their home 
in Portland, Ore. 



QHS Class Of 1941 Planning Nov. 7 Reunion 



The reunion committee of the 
Quincy High School Class of 1941 
met recently to finalize plans for 
the 40th year reunion scheduled 
for Saturday, Nov. 7, at the 
Quincy Neighborhood Club. 

Anyone with information on the 
following members is asked to 
call 335-1842 or 337-0953: 

Coleman Daley, Jean 

(Erickson) Demetropoulos. 



Kathleen (Flynn) Dillon, Phyllis 
(Filippina) Arcese, Shirley 
(Gartner) Howe, Nancy (Libby) 
Cusijer, Mary Miller Michael. 
Evelyn (Tocchio) Kovasoski, 
Marion (Smith) Aveigo, Marjorie 
(Peterson) Rose, Eleanor 
(Fanning) Weeks, Margaret 
(Driscoll) Erickson, Ruth 
(Stewart) Kimball, Helen Hamill, 
Olavi Huhtala, Arlrnc (McClure) 



Greene, John Mitchell, Alice 
(McGowan) Eaton, Gloria Arronte 
Monroe, Rachel (Bartholomew) 
Henderson, Claire (Brennion) 
Schlichte, Grace (Cobelle) 
Rowett, Lael Cutter, Barbara 
Gardner, Thomas Keating, Paul 
Langelier, John Loria, Louise 
Lucci, George Murray, Elsie 
(Raitto) Carey, Johne Lane and 
Charles Wood. 



Abp. Williams Class Of 1961 Ri r th<; 



Planning Oct. 30 Reunion 



Abp. Williams high school 
Class of 1961 will hold its 20th 
anniversary reunion on Oct. 30 at 
6:30 p.m. at the Wollaston Golf 
Club. 999 Randolph Ave., Milton. 

The committee is trying to 
locate the following classmates: 

Peter Alessi, Ed Barry, Gail 
Boucher. Barbara Boyle Spencer, 
Suzanne Buckley, Joyce Byrne 
Savage, Rita Cahill Orlando, 
Barbara Chandler, John Cleary, 
Jack Connolly, Jo Ann Conroy, 
Hector Cormier, Joe Coughlan, 
Jim Coyman, John Coyne, Ken 
Dalton, Carol Darcy, Ellen 
Delaney Stengler, Carol 

Desmond, Mary DiBona 

Balducci, Dick Dilorio, Donna 
Drago, Gerrv Dullea, Joe Findley, 
Diane Flagg. Matt Foley, Kerry 
Foye. Charlie Furlong, Maryellen 
Gallagher, Jane Galvin, John 
Galvin, Dick Grant, Janice Green, 
Marilyn Green, Fred Grimshaw, 
Harrv Guilfov. Matt Haley, Ray 



Save Gas and Money . 
. . . Shop Locally 



Hennebury, Fred Hoyle, 
Dorothea Jarvis, Marjorie Kelly, 
Kathy Kenneally Reidy, Wanda 
Koslowski, Fred Kremin, Phil 
Labreque, Mary Leahy, Peter 
Loan, Tom Long, Greg Lynch, 
Dave MacFarlane. 

Madeline Marella, Maureen 
Marr, Richard McConnell, Betty 
McGinn, Carol McGinty 

McNulty, Ken McGowan, 
Frances McGrath, Kathy 
McWilliams, Al Meehan, Diane 
Miller, Randi Monti, Jim Morey, 
Neil Moriarty, Arlene 

Munichiello, John Nazzaro, Larry 
Nourse, Anne Nugent, Andy 
O'Brien, Bob Parkis, Gael 
Pearson, Roy Perry, Judy 
Raymondi, Brendan Riordan, Joe 
Ryan, Ed Rynne, William 
Saunders, Dick Schnyer, Joe 
Scully, Dick Sergi, Dan Sullivan, 
Doug Towle, Bill Travis, Jane 
Trostel Krauss, Maureen Walsh, 
Phyllis Welsh Collins, Bob 
Wessling, Paul Wilkie, Ron 
Youngclaus, Sandra Zacchini. 

Anyone knowing any of the 
"missing" classmates is asked to 
send the information to David 
Cronin, 15 Academy St., 
Braintree. 



$10 OVEN CLEANED $10 
$14 RUGS CLEANED per room $14 

Bob's Oven Cleaning Service 773-8171 




Thayer 



An Outdoor Camp for Boys and Girls 4-13 

Second Session: Four Weeks 

July 27 - August 21, 1981 46th Session 

745 Washington Street, Braintree 

Under thp direction of Thayer Academy and located on 
its campus, Camp Thayer features swimming instruction 
using an Olympic sized pool, drama, tennis, archt;ry 
arts and crafts, sailing, boating, water skiing. Call or 
write for a catalog. Phone 843 3580. 



DRAPERY 

CLEANING 

PLUS 



Plus Take Down and ReHang in your home or office 
Plus No Shrink written statement 
Plus the finest gentle cleaning and perfection pleating 
CALL 698-8300 - 



Walk in drapery cleaning 
accepted at all locations 



CI 



June 20 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Keene 
(Carol Draper), 22 Francis Dr.. 
Randolph, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Crawley 
(Maryellen Zanghi), 94 Franklin 
St., Braintree, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert McEvoy 
(Barbara Ware), 7 Belmont St., 
North Quincy, a daughter. 
June 25 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Scanlon, 
(Susan Poole) Constionc Dr., 
Tyngsboro. a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Stuart. 
(Leah Rivera) 6I8 West Chestnut 
St.. Brockton, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
MacFawn. (Lucille Fiorillo), 50 
Roberts Dr.. Weymouth, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael 

McConnell (Susan Dempsey). I9I 

"D" King Ave.. Weymouth, a 

daughter. 

July 3 

Mr and Mrs. John Chisholm 

(Susan Seaver), 7 Austin St., Hyde 

Park, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Herbert 

(Patricia Compston), 2ll 

President's Lane, a son. 

July 5 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Chambers 
(Patricia Sullivan), 20 Skyline Dr., 
Braintree, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Manganga 
Dlamini (Faith Shongwe). 142 
Willow St., Wollaston, a daughter. 
July 6 

Mr. and Mrs. Brad Manter 
(Paula Solimini), 20 Germain 
Ave., Quincy, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Petik 
(Cannette Mattina), 25 Russell 
Rd., Hanover, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Pivnicny 
(Catherine Hickman), 25I South 
Central Ave., Wollaston, a 
daughter. 

July 7 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis 
Hollingshead (Ronna Cone), 28 
Brookline Ave., Hull, a son. 
July 8 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Chase 
(Helene Provost). 32 Waldo 
Street, Randolph, a son. 
July 9 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Petit 
(Karen Finnegan), 1 45. Highland 
Ave., Wollaston, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Griffin 
(Jean Fit/gerald), 570 Ashmont 
St., Fields Corner, a son. 
July 12 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Liu//o 
(Elizabeth Moran) 40 Vassall St.. 
Wollaston, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dolbeare 
(Marian Ryan), 262 Atlantic St., 
North Quincy, a son. 



ELECTROLYSIS 



UNWANTED HAIR 
PERMANENTLY 
REMOVED 

Face, Eyebrows, 
Body, Legs, Hairline 

Dolores MacMillon, R.E. 

680 Hancock St., Wollaston 

Office hours by appointment 
Complimentary consultation available 

471-9500 or 471-0214 



Thursday, July 16, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 7 




MR. and MRS. DA VID A. LEONE 



(Pagdr Studios) 



Christine M. Vallier Bride 
Of David A. Leone 



Christine M. Vallier and David 
A. Leone were married recently at 
St. Mary's Church, West Quincy, 
during a wedding ceremony 
performed by Rev. Francis J. 
Griffin. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank W. Vallier, Jr., of 
39 Kent St., West Quincy. A 1980 
graduate of Quincy High school, 
she is employed by Woodside 
Executive Travel, Boston. 

The bridegroom, son of Mr.and 
Mrs. Albert Leone of 19 Pray St., 
Quincy Point, is a graduate of 
Quincy Vocational Technical 
School. He is employed by Grass 
Instrument Co., Braintree. 



Maid of honor was Theresa 
Vallier of West Quincy. 
Bridesmaids were Eleanor Vallier, 
Loretta Mullen, Elaine Mullen 
and Diane Shea, all of Quincy. 

Best man was Thomas Leone of 
Quincy. Ushers were Frank W. 
Vallier III, Gary Leone, Peter 
Leone and Keith Mullen, all of 
Quincy; and Joseph Naples of 
Braintree. 

Ringbearer was Michael Mullen 
of Quincy. Flower girl was Maria 
Jackson of Quincy. 

A reception was held at the 
Bryan VFW Post, Quincy. 

The newly weds are making their 
home in Brockton. 



Quincy Women's Club 
To Hold Card Party 



Mrs. Theodore Buker, first vice 
president and finance chairman of 
the Quincy Women's Club, 
announces the next social and card 
party will beheld Tuesday, July 21. 

The event will begin at 12:30 
p.m. at the clubhouse, 148 
President's Lane. The public is 
invited. 

Refreshments will be served. 
There will be a prize for each table. 



All proceeds go to the club's 
general fund. 

Mrs. William Lutes is chairman, 
assisted by Mrs. Charles LeVine, 
president; Mrs. Buker, Mrs. 
Richard Forrest, Mrs. Alan C. 
Heath, Mrs. Anna Kenney and 
Helena F. McCormick. 

The next party will be Tuesday, 
Aug. 4, at the clubhouse. 



Ticket Deadline For NQHS 
Class Of '71 Reunion 



Friday, July 31, is the ticket 
deadline for the 10th year reunion 
of the North Quincy High School 
Class of 1971 Friday, Sept. II. at 
Lantana, Randolph. 

The evening will feature a 
cocktail hour 7 to 8 p.m., hot and 
cold buffet, music and an open bar. 

Tickets, which will not be sold at 
the door, are limited. 

For more reunion information, 
contact committee members 



Arlene Boyd Evans, Christene 
Guest McGuire, Linda Murphy, 
Cuddy or James deVerannes. 




ENCAGED — Mr. Paul E. Erler 
of 50 Hunt St., North Quincy. 
announces the engagement of 
his daughter, Mary, to William 
E. Goslin, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
John P. Goslin, of 153 Highland 
Ave., Wollaston. Miss Erler, also 
the daughter of the late Mrs. 
Ethel A. Erler, is a graduate of 
North Quincy High School and 
Quincy Junior College. She is 
employed by College Town. Mr. 
Goslin is a graduate of Quincy 
Vocational Technical School. He 
is employed by the Boston 
Globe. A September wedding is 
planned. 

(Mc. Inures Studio) 



Social 



QHS Class Of 1966 
Planning Reunion 

Members of the Quincy High 
School Class of 1966 are invited to 
work on the committee which is 
planning the 15th class reunion. 

Anyone interested in working 
on the committee can call 
328-3738 or 337-6655. 

The committee would also like 
to be notified of class members 
who have changed their address 
in the last five years. 





The Florist 

389 Hancock St. 
Quincy 

328-3959 

Since 1900 



td &<mcA @f<€la*t 



INSTANT COLOR 

PASSPORT 
PHOTOS 

JtcSntire 3 

Studio 

679 Hancock St., Wollaston 

Closed Monday Tel: 479-6888 



Virginia's Nursery 
Day Care and 
Kindergarten 

on Wollaston Beach 

Open Year Round. Early 
Childhood Education. 
Call Virginia 

328-4332 





fob 

"Vacation 

July 18 - Aug. 3rd 

Senior Citizens Discount 



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Open Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 A.M. — 5:30 P.M. 

Open Thurs. eves 'til 8:30 



773-5266 




MR. and MRS. DA VID M. SW ANTON 



(Frangioso Sludio) 



Jill F. McGuire Married 
To David M. Swanton 



Jill F. McGuire and David M. 
Swanton were married recently 
during a wedding ceremony at 
Quincy Point Congregational 
Church. 

The bride is the daughter of Mrs. 
James McGuire of I08 Baxter 
Ave., Quincy Point, and the late 
Mr. McGuire. She is a graduate of 



and 



Quincy High School 
Bridgewater State College. 

The bridegroom, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. James L. Swanton of 44 
Bickford Rd., Braintree, is a 
graduate of Braintree High School 
and Bridgewater State College. 

The newlyweds are making their 
home in Brockton. 



LOVE IS 




. a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 

Speak to Terry Stracco - She's our rental agent - 
specializing in complete wedding package plans 
and all other occasions. The Golden Lion Suite 
accommodates up to 300. The Venetian Room up 
to 1 50 guests. Give Terr) a call for an appointment 
for your reservation. New brochures are available, 
(air conditioned) 

CALL Quincy Sons of Italy Social Center 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy, MA 02169 

NEW NUMBER is 472-5900 






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PaRt 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, I9SI 



Obituaries 



Edmund T. Grogan, 65, 
Business Machine 



Company Owner 



A funeral Mass for Edmund T. 
Grogan, 65, of Quincy, president 
of Grogan Business Machines, 
Inc., of Quincy, was said Monday 
at St. Mary's Church, West 
Quincy. 

Mr. Grogan died July 10, at 
Quincy City Hospital. 

A lifelong Quincy resident, he 
was graduated from Quincy High 
School in 1934 and also attended 
Northeastern University. 

A World War II Army veteran, 
he was active in the business 
community in this city for many 
years. 

Mr. Grogan was a member of 
the Knights of Columbus, St. 



Mary's Holy Name Society, 
Morrisette American Legion Post 
and the Chamber of Commerce. 

He is survived by his wife, Sarah 
D. (McDonough) Grogan; three 
sons, Kevin P. Grogan, Edmund 
T. Grogan Jr., and Michael J. 
Grogan, all of Quincy; and four 
daughters, Kathleen A. Grogan, 
Mary-Ellen Grogan, Noreen V. 
Grogan and Sarah T. Grogan, all 
of Quincy; a brother, Joseph 
Grogan of Quincy; and two 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were by 
Joseph Sweeney Funeral Home, 
74 Elm St. Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 



Haakon L. Nielsen, 75, 
Retired Electrician 



A funeral service for Haakon L. 
Nielsen, 75, of Quincy, a retired 
General Electric Company 
electrician, will be held tonight 
(Thursday) at 8 p.m. at Westwood 
Evangelical Free Church, 47 
Washington St., Westwood. 

Mr. Nielsen died Saturday in 
Quincy City Hospital. 

He had lived in Quincy for seven 
years. 

Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, 
he previously lived in Mattapan. 

He is survived by his wife, Edna 
J. (Johansen) Nielsen; a daughter, 
Mrs. Wayne Muise of San 



Antonio, Tex.; four sisters, Edel 
Pardazi of Denmark, Ingeborg 
Palm of New York City, N.Y., 
Karen Schacke of Denmark and 
Bergliot Nielsen of Brockton; and 
several nieces and nephews. 

Visiting hours are omitted. 
Funeral arrangements are by 
Wickens & Troupe Funeral Home. 

Burial will be in Central 
Cemetery, Randolph, Friday at 9 
a.m. 

In lieu of flowers, donations in 
his memory may be made to the 
memorial fund of Westwood 
Evangelical Free Church. 



Henrietta M. Yourell-Ryan, 96 



A funeral Mass for Henrietta M. 
(Yourell) Yourell-Ryan, 96, a 
Quincy resident for 10 years, was 
held Wednesday at St. John's 
Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. Yourell-Ryan died July 12, 
in Presidential Manor Nursing 
Home. 



Quincy 
Hearing 
Aid Dispensers 



'1246 Hancock St. 
ncalfd next door tol 
Bartain Center 

Hearing aids and 
batteries are now 
available to Medicaid 
I'll Card holders! 



Born in Ireland, she had 
previously lived in Dorchester and 
South Boston before moving to 
Quincy. 

Wife of the late Mr. Martin J. 
Ryan, she is survived by three 
daughters, Mary Conely of 
Pasadena, Texas, Esther Yourell 
and Christina Mckeon, both of 
Quincy; three grandchildren and 
two great grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were by 
Sweeney Brothers Home for 
Funerals, I Independence Ave. 

Burial was in Mt. Benedict 
Cemetery, West Roxbury. 



Trials 



773-0900 

Robert Karat 

Certified Hearing 
Aid Audioloqi.t 



\ ' f / 




MEMORIAL 
GIFTS 

Luiunout vestments attar 
books candles sloles 
sacred vessels etc 

All Memorial gifts promptly 
memorialised without charge 

A. E. GOODHUE CO. 

13-15 School St., Quincy, 472-3090 



Over 400 Attend Funeral 

Dennis F. Ryan: He 
Touched A Lot Of People 



"He came as close to being all 
things to all men as any individual 
I know," said Judge Henry H. 
Chmielinski Jr. "Singlehandedly, 
he had an influence on the whole 
South Shore. I don't know how 
many people he saved." 

It was likely that some of them 
were in the crowd of morethan 400 
people who filled St. Ann's Church 
in Wollaston Saturday for the 
funeral of Dennis F. Ryan, clerk of 
Quincy District Court for 30 years 
until his retirement May 13. 

He died July 8 at his Wollaston 
home of cancer at the age of 70. 

"Dennis Ryan was perhaps one 
of the finest people I met in my 
life," said Judge Chmielinski. "In 
every sense he was one of the most 
moral and one of the most 
compassionate of men. He had the 
keenest sense of equity and justice 
imaginable. 

"You can judge him by his 
farewell dinner. He had just retired 
and was in no position to do 
anyone favors. But the dinner 
attracted close to 1,000 people. 
That was a measure of the 
appreciation people had for him." 

Monsignor James Scally, pastor 
of St. Ann's eulogi/ed Ryan as a 
man whose values were "well 
ordered, well regulated and well 
constructed. He knew exactly 
where he came from, why he was 
here and where he was going." 

He said Mr. Ryan's final days 
revealed his very best qualities. 

"He knew he was dying,"he said, 
"and he suffered in silence." 

After the Mass, Monsignor 
Scally recalled that he first met Mr. 
Ryan in Quincy District Court 
when, as a young priest, he went 
for help for the cousin of a 
classmate. The court clerk helped 
out and their relationship 
blossomed. 

"I consider it a privilege to have 
lived long enough to become his 
pastor," said Monsignor Scally. 

"Dennis Ryan extended himself 
and dispensed a certain type of 
justice to settle disputes or help a 
youngster in trouble," said Mayor 
Arthur H. Tobin."Heknewhowto 
get things done. 

"Every court in the Common- 
wealth has an official title but 
Quincy was known as 'Ryan's 
Court.' There is no finer tribute 
than that. He touched a lot of 
people." 

Municipal flags and those at 
many business establishments in 
the city were flown at half staff 
until Saturday for Ryan, who 
listed among his friends a president 
of the United States. 

Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, 
brother of the late President John 
F. Kennedy, said: 




uteentti jtitneral mvuitt 



DENNIS S. SWEENEY, Director 
Non Sectarian 





« ^ " "ii.i» i 



1^,... ~~r1 




74 HLM ST. 
QUINCY 

773-2728 



326COPELAND 
W. QUINCY 

773-2728 



Successor to M. Joseph Sweeney 
PARKING FACILITIES 




DENNIS F. RYAN 



"I am saddened by the passing of 
Dennis Ryan. He was a good 
friend of the Kennedy family and 
an outstanding public servant. I 
would like to express to his family 
my deep and sincere sympathy." 

Monsignor Scally was principal 
celebrant of the Mass with other 
local priests participating. They 
included: 

The Rev. John T. Foley of St. 
Ann's, the Rev. Alfred Finn, 
chaplain at Long Island Hospital; 
the Rev. William McCarthy, 
pastor of St. John's Church; the 
Rev. Msgr. Paul P. DonelinofSt. 
Mary's Church; and his brother, 
the Rev. John M. Donelin of St. 
Patrick's Church, Watertown, 
both Quincy residents. 

Among those attending the 
funeral were: 

Sheriff Clifford Marshall and a 
delegation of deputy sheriffs; City 
Council President Leo J. Kelly; 
Mayor Arthur H. Tobin; City 
Councillor John J. Quinn; former 
Gov. Foster Furcolo; Senate 
Counsel James R. Mclntyre; City 
Councillor Daniel G. Raymondi. 

Rep. Michael W. Morrissey; 
former Rep. and City Councillor 
Joseph E. Brett; County 
Commissioner George McDonald; 
CETA Director Paul Ricca; 
School Committee Members John 
J. Sullivan, Patricia Toland and 
Joan Picard; Sen. Paul D. Harold, 
Quincy Sun Publisher Henry 
Bosworth. 

Judge Joseph Fecney of South 
Boston District Court; Judge Paul 
Murphy of West Roxbury District 
Court; Appellate Judge Francis 
Larkin of Worcester District 
Court; Fire Chief Edward Barry; 
Countv Treasurer James Collins. 



George Kennealy, assistant 
Senate Counsel; James J. Ricciuti, 
public works commissioner; John 
Concannon, clerk of Norfolk 
County Superior Court; and 
personnel of the Quincy District 
Court. 

A native of South Boston, Ryan 
lived in Quincy for 50 years and his 
career as a lawyer, clerk- 
magistrate and community leader 
was deeply entwined with the life 
of his city. 

Last May I, Judge Albert R. 
Kramer took the unprecedented 
step of passing along to Ryan the 
honor of giving the Law Day 
address at Quincy Court. He 
received several standing ovations. 

Assistant Clerk Robert Bloom 
presented Ryan a plaque from the 
staff of the clerk's office and noted 
that "50 years from now, people 
will still walk past the courthouse 
and say, 'that's Denny Ryan's 
courthouse." 

Ryan attended Boston College 
High School, Boston College and 
Boston College Law School, 
starting his law practice in Quincy 
in 1937. He served as an Army 
captain in Europe during World 
War II. 

He was a member of the School 
Committee for one term (1950-51) 
during the Plan E government 
years and later served on the 
Hospital Board of Managers, 
retiring last September. 

He devoted many hours to 
charitable work, heading the 1954 
Red Cross campaign in Quincy 
and serving on the Red Cross 
board of directors. He belonged to 
the United Fund Drive and the 
Community Chest. 

Ryan was a former president of 
the Quincy Bar Association and a 
member of the Massachusetts Bar. 

He belonged to the Bryan VFW 
Post, the Morrisette Legion Post, 
the Quincy Elks, the Quincy 
Kiwanis Club, the North Quincy 
Knights of Columbus and the 
Boston College Club of Quincy. 

He leaves his widow, Caroline 
(Kenney) Ryan; three sons, Dennis 
M. Ryan of Weymouth. 
Christopher P. Ryan of Quincy, 
and Kevin G. Ryan of 
Gaithersburg, Md., and a 
daughter, Mrs. Patricia A. 
Richard of Pryor, Okla; a sisto, 
Catherine Ryan of Quincy; and 
four grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mt. Wollaston 
Cemetery. 



Deaths 



Hilja (Tossavinen) Rautiala. 86, of 
East Braintree, formerly of West 
Quincy, in Quincy City Hospital, July 
13. 

C. Abbot! Johnson, 86, of Saint 
Johns, Mich., formerly of Quincy, July 
13, in Clinton Memorial Hospital. 

Rubena (Marcus) Wareham. of 
Wareham, formerly of Quincy, in Toby 
Hospital, July 12. 

Mary E. (Dwyer) Reddy, 84, of 



Quiiu.}, in Quincy Nursing Home, July 
10. 

Charles E. Donoghue, of Quincy, 
July II. 

Kevin J. O'Malley, 21, of 
Dorchester, formerly of Quincy, July 
II. 

Helen M. (Shea) Murphy, 76, of 
Milton, formerly of Quincy, at home, 
July 10. 

George Smith, of Quincy and Nova 
Scotia, July 8. 



ieurare 
{Brothers 



FUNERAL HOME and CHAPELS 




Donald M. Deware 

Director 



576 Hancock Street, Quincy 
Tel: 472-1 137 

Non-Sectarian 
Services rendered to any distance 

39 yeais under same Ownership and Directorship 



Thursday, July 16, 1981 Quincy Sun Pa*e 9 



Broad Meadows Junior High 
School announces 179 students 
are on the fourth-quarter honor 
roll. They are: 

High Honors 
Grade 7 
Denise L. DeCoste, Susan E. 
Ferguson, Lisa M. Fitzgerald, 
Matthew F. Gorman, Patricia M. 
Houten, Paul J. Hussey, Joan M. 
Keane, Thomas J. Kelly, Judith 
Kineavy, Robert J. MacMillan, Karen 

B. Mahoney, Susan B. McDonald, 
Peter A. Mellyn, Karen O'Neil, 
William P. Santino. 

Honors 
Grade 7 
Christopher A. Anastasi, Eugene 

C. Andella Jr., Catherine Brill, Maura 
Caldwell, David M. Chenette, Nancy 
J. Connolly, Robert F. Connolly, 
Colleen Craig, Sharon L. DelGreco, 
Edward J. Flavin, Colman C. Joyce, 
Maureen A. Kelley, Laurie A. Killilea, 
Steven Killilea, Edward P. Lyons Jr., 
Kimberly A. Malvcsti, Christine M. 
McCloskey, Helen E. Mina, A. Cheryl 
Mitrushi, David E. Murphy, Shawn C. 
Murphy, John J. Picarski, Charles W. 
Pitts, Donald Scrvaes, Brian M. 
Stewart, Sally M. Teixeira, Mary M. 
Thornton, Brenda J. Urbanus, Donna 
E. Willbridge. 

High Honors 
Grade 8 
Michele R. Carmody, Tina M. 
Chernicki, Jeanne A. Crispo, 
Christine A. Keddy, Stephen E. 
Magee, Kenneth L. Maher, Kathleen 
M. O'Donnell, Andrew R. Peter, 
Lynda A. Quigley, Kathleen P. 
Thornton, Deborah L. Thurston. 

Honors 
Grade 8 
Joan M. Agres, Laurie J. Anson, 
Dcbra A. Bambery, Susan M* 
Boudreau, Stephen A. Brennan, 
Robert J. Carty, Judith A. Clasby, 
Regina Coletti, Alfred T. Conant, 
Joseph Conti, Kerry A. Corbett, 
Roscann Cristiani, Marjorie L. 
Flemming, Sean P. Galligan, James 
M. Gardner, John H. Gleba, Laurie A. 
Happnic, Patrick Hennessey, Leanne 
M. Holbrook, Karen A. Hurley, Paul 
A. Hutchinson, Kelly A. Keeley, 
John G. Kelly, James M. Leary, 
Denise R. Loud, Timothy P. Lynch, 
Caroline Madden, Christopher 
Mahoney, Sanaa Makram, Cheryl A. 
Malvesti, Maria N. Q. Mandawe, Lynn 
A. Manton, Nancy A. McDonald, 
Nancy E. Mellyn, Lee A. Mitchell, 
Linda P. O'Brien, Kerry J. Ogilvie, 
William R. O'Malley, Robert R. 
Pearson, Robert S. Price, Jamie A. 
Reardon, Lynda L. Rice, Kelly A. 
Rose, Brett M. Satkus, Suzanne 
Scola, Kevin M. Servaes, Tinamarie 
Sheehan, David J. Squatrito, John 
Steen, Susan C. Sutter, Robert C. 
Thomson, Virginia Wilson. 




Dental 
Corner 



by 



Lee A. WelkyD.M.D. 

CLEANING TOO OFTEN? 
Q: I like the feeling of having 
my teeth cleaned. If this 
were done every three mon- 
ths, could it wear the enam- 
el off my teeth? 

A: Definitely not. The "pol- 
ish" that dentists use is 
somewhat abrasive to re- 
move stain and plaque, but 
at the speed with which it 
is applied it can not damage 
enamel. Enamel is stronger 
than bone and is the hardest 
substance in the body. 

Q: Is there a simple technique I 
can use to stimulate the cir- 
culation in my gums? 

A: Probably one of the easiest 
techniques is massaging the 
gums with the fingertips. 
After brushing, wet your 
index finger, and rub it in a 
circular motion along the 
margins of the gums where 
they meet the teeth. 

Presented as a service to the 

community by 

Lee A. WelkyD.M.D. 
234 Sea Street 
Quincy 
479-3030 



179 On Broad Meadows Honor Roll 



High Honors 

Grade 9 
Elizabeth A. Anderson, Susan M. 
Beven, Jeffrey S. Bouffard, Paul S. 
Burke, Jacqueline M. Coleman, Jean 
M. Conso, Margaret M. Cullen, 
Frances I. Denvir, Susan A. McGrail, 
Peter P. McPartlin Cynthia Morrell, 
Carol M. O'Rourke, Brian J. Peach, 
Kristine Picarski, Karla A. Robertson, 
Adam W. Rosen. 

Honors 

Grade 9 
Robin M. Anshewitz, Kathleen M. 
Barry, Linda J. Burgess, Barbara J. 
Canale, Tracy A. Chadbourne, Regina 
M. Clasby, Karen A. Connick, Laurie 
J. Cosgrove, Kaen E. Cullen, Randall 
S. DiGiacomo, James A. Donahue, 



Christine Donovan, William K. 
Gardner, Dianne M. Graham, Ann M. 
Grant, Elaine R. Greenough, Carrie 
K. Hallett, Michele M. Healey, 
Michael Hennessey, Jeffrey M. Horn, 
Kathleen L. Hurd, Anne M. 

Hutchinson, Michelle Jolle, Mary M. 
Joyce, Nancy J. Keane, Jennifer L. 
Knowlton, Theresa M. Lawton, 
Christine M. Lombardi, Lisa M. 
Lundin, Deborah MacDonald, Cheryl 
A. Mahoney, Kimberly H. Marshall, 
Patricia McCarthy, Kimberly 
McGuinness, Christopher J. Murray, 
Mary C. Noll, Michael Notarangelo, 
Kelly A. Ogilvie, Mary Perkins, 
Michelle Pitts, William J. Price, David 
L. Rich, Lisa M. Richardson, Julie M. 
Robertson, Stephen M. Rose, 



Bronwyn R. Roy, Renee F. Ryan, 
Catherine E. Skarbinski, Sheryl 
Spaniak, Lauralyn Steen, Daniel W. 



Trabucco, Barbara Vejvoda, 

Christopher Wood, Susan B. Wright, 
Susan P. Zeiba. 



TIMEX 

Factory authorized Service Center 
In and Out-of-Warranty Watches Repaired 
Genuine TIMEX Energy Cells available 

J^OqSkf Jewelers 

1402 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY 
773-3636 




siestas MATTRESS and FOUNDATION 





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O OFF 

Don't sleep thru thi 
sale. ..This week you 
buy Serta's Royalpedi 
Supreme mattress 
foundation at 50% off 
price it was before this 
and the price it will 
after this sale! 




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All other Serta 
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SPECIAL SAVINGS ON SLEEPYTIME IDEAS! 



LIMITED QUANTITIES 





BRASS 
BEDS 

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Select the style to suit your 
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NOW ON SALE 



• DEOHAM 

Rte. 1 near Rte 128 
Near Cinema 
326-9586 



• FRAMINGHAM 
Rte. 9, Corner Rte. 126 
Beyond Shoppers' World 
879-8911 



• STOUGHTONfRANDOLPH 
Rte. 139 at Rte. 24 
963-2000 



QUINCY 

30 School St. 
Between Firestone 

& St. John's Church 
479-5119 



• NEWTON HIGHLANDS 

Rte. 9 - 999 Boylston St. 
1 Mile easlbound of Rte. 128 
244-6200 

• WEST BRIDGEWATER 
Rte. 106 and Rte. 28 
Center Shopping Plaza 
583-9336 



• BURLINGTON 

89 Cambridge St. 
Rte. 3A 

273-0800 

• HANOVER 

193 Columbia Rd. 
On Rte. 53 at Rte 139 
826-8881 






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©COPYRIGHT 1980 SUNSHINE 



Pii Re 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16. 1981 



North Quincy/Wollaston 




GRADUATES of the Atlantic Neighborhood Center's recent six session babysitting course are available for 
babysitting in the Atlantic area. Arrangements can be made by calling the center at 773- 1 380, ext. 328. From 
left, front, are Gail Bull, Claire Yovino, Linda Naughton, Ruth Buenaventura, Susanne Riley, Elaine 
Hennebury, Stephanie Byron, Cathy Fair, Jackie Fennessey, Beth Doherty. Middle row, Ann Marie Kelly, 
Bonnie Carty, Mary McGuirk, Kim Cunio, Hope Walsh, Patricia Hester, Kathleen Hendsbee, Christine 
Swirk, Karen \\ ilk, Kim Fraser. Top row, Linda Kane, Nanig Gheridian, Carlene Pellecchia, Michelle 
Cobban, Donna Ierardi, Paula Connell, Debbie Pitts and Kim Rudnisky. 



WANT 
* 1,000? 



Buy a One-Thousand- 
Dollar certificate at Granite 
Co-op for only $737.86 ... 
thirty months later you can 
redeem your certificate for 
full face value. No other 
bank on the South Shore 
makes this offer. 



Giamte^ 

co-operative^ 
c Bljifk 



Squantum 

Center 
Schedule 

The Squantum Community 
Center, 136 Standish Rd., 
announces its activities schedule 
for the month of July: 

July 21, trip to the Children's 
Museum. The bus will leave at 9:30 
a.m. 

July 22, Boston Harbor Cruise, 
for seniors only. Bus leaves at 9:45 
a.m. 

July 29, trip to Lincoln Park. 
The bus will leave at I p.m. and 
return at 7 p.m. 

The Blood pressure clinic will be 
held every Thursday, 9:30 to 10:30 
a.m. 

Residents may sign up now for 
Foxboro Harness Racing and 
Dinner, Tuesday, Aug. I I at 6p.m. 

Deirdre Neal 
Accepted To Berklee 

Boston's Berklee College of 
Music has enrolled Deirdre A. 
Neal, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Gerard Neal of 386 Beach St., 
Wollaston, in its freshman class 
of 1981. 




NORTH QUINCY 
440 Hancock St. 
773-8100 

QUINCY CENTER 
100 Granite St. 
471-3900 



Ask for a certificate at either office. Earn 
$262.14 on your $737 86 investment. 
Premature redemption requires a substantial 
penalty if permission to redeem is granted by 
the bank. All deposits insured in full. 




indoorFLAGS OUTDOOR 

State ACCESSORIES Church 

Flags Flap of All Nations Flags 

FLAGS MADE TO ORDER 

EAGLE FLAG CO.JNC. 



147 Beach St. 
Wollaston. Mass. 02170 



617 
472-8242 



Squantum July 4th 
Winners Announced 



The Squantum Community 
Association's July 4th celebration 
got underway with the 72nd 
parade headed by grand marshals 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hansen of 
Bellvue Road. 

The parade included four 
bands, two color guards, six floats 
and over 100 marching children in 
decorated costumes or wearing 
Squantum Little league 

uniforms. The police, firemen. 
Civil Defense workers and city 
officials also marched. 

Prizes were presented to the 
best costumed marchers and 
floats as follows: 

Floats - 1. "Come to the 
Cookout", Wedgewood Street; 2. 
"State Fair", Standish/Shore- 
ham Streets; 3. "Water Rats 
Camping and Canoe Trip", 
Wedgewood Street. 

Costumed marchers: 

Singles - 1. Michael Thornton, 
dressed as a lobster; 2. Neal 
Cadogan, Martian; 3. Leslie 
Coughlin, ice cream cone. 

Doubles - 1. Blythe Bumpus 
and Chris Cameron, royal 
wedding (Lady Di and Prince 
Charles); 2. Patricia Smith and 
Bradley Smith, Squanto and 
squaw; 3. Tricia Sheridan and 
Ginger Bimbler, The Globe's 
Here. 

Groups - 1. Jane Coscio, 
Bethany Golden and Amanda 
Young, butterflies and catcher; 2. 
Britta, Kelly, Sean, Jonathan and 
Adam Connolly and Buddy Hizer, 
Saturday night bath; 3. John 
McCarthy, Kim Seroll and 
Ashley-Lynch Mahoney, 

Flintstones. 

In the afternoon field events 
were held at the rear of the 
Squantum School with the 
following winners: 

25-yard race - Boys 2-3, 1. 
Randy Milburn; 2. Andy 
Cameron; 3. Tommy Nash; boys 
4-5, 1. Shawn Skahan; 2. Jason 
LaPorte; 3. Eric Anderson; boys 
6-7. 1. Brian Campbell; 2. Brian 
Smith; 3. Patrick Clifford; girls 
4-5, 1. Christine Richmond; 2. 
Heather Milburn; 3. tie between 
Joanne Keohane and Sarah 
Radell; girls 6-7, 1. Kerry Merrill; 
2. Amanda Young; 3. Mary Ellen 
Cameron. 

50-yard race - Girls 8-9, 1. 
Denise Flannery: 2. Johanna 



McAllister; 3. Kerry Ryan; boys 
8-9, 1. Tommy Merrill; 2. Billy 
Campbell; 3. Richard Bouchard. 

100-yard race - Girls 10-11. 1. 
Susanne Rosher; 2. Betsy 
McAllistar; 3. Pamela Parise; 
girls 12-14, 1. Ann Valentine; 2. 
Jane MacLeod; 3. Jennifer 
Gannon; boys 10-11, 1. Shawn 
Nash; 2. Peter Saich; 3. Michael 
Saich; boys 12-14, 1. Tim 
McDonough; 2. Shawn Saich; 3. 
Chris Saniuk. 

Sack race - pre-school-5, 1. 
Christine Richmond; 2. Emily 
Estabrook; 3. tie between Katie 
Mahoney, Jonathan and Kelly 
Connolly; boys 6-8, 1. Billy and 
Brian Campbell; 2. Patrick 
Clifford and Peter Nash; 3. Brian 
Smith; girls 6-8, 1. Kerry Merrill; 

2. Mary Ellen Cameron; 3. 
Kristen Ryan; boys 9-11, 1. Tulley 
Higer; 2. Tommy Merrill; 3. 
Michael Saich; girls 9-11, 1. 
Susan Rasher; 2. Pamela Parise; 

3. Betsy McAllistar; boys 12-14, 

1. Rick Lincoln; 2. Shawn Saich; 
3. Jimmy Brian; girls 12-14, 1. 
Ann Valentine; 2. Kathy 
Kennedy; 3. Jennifer Gannon. 

Flagpole race (approximately 
600 yards) - boys all ages, 1. Rick 
Lincoln; 2. Mike Pepin; 3. Tom 
Merrill; girls all ages - 1. Ann 
Valentine; 2. Ann Lombardi; 3. 
Dawn McKinnon. 

There were 47 starters in the 
annual Squantum road race. 
Medals were awarded to the 
winners in all categories. 

The winners: 

Boys age 12-15, 1. Scott Coyne; 

2. Chris Gizellis; 3. Michael 
Barry. 

Boys 16-20, 1. Tim McCormick; 
2. Bill Timmins; 3. John 
McGuiggin. 

Men 21-30, 1. Steve Meller; 2. 
Ed LaPointe; 3- Paul Shilalie. 

Men over 30, 1. Paul Duddy; 2. 
George Klier; 3. Mike Cushing. 

Girls 12-15, 1. Kelly Doherty; 
2. Ann McGuiggan; 3. tie 
between Ann Lombardi and 
Sheila Graham. 

Girls 16-20, 1. Jane 
McQuiggan; 2. Amanda Mujica. 

Women 21-30, 1. Dottie Klier; 
2. Mary Ellen Mastrorilli; 3. Gail 
Lombardi. 

Women over 30, 1. Beverly 
Smith; 2. Virginia Leguia. 



Francis LaPierre Completes 
AF Field Training 



Cadet Francis J. LaPierre, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. 
LaPierre Sr., 21 Randlett St., 
Wollaston, has completed an Air 
Force ROTC field training 
encampment at Dover Air Force 
Base, Del. 

During the encampment, the 



cadets received survival and small 
arms training and aircraft and 
aircrew indoctrination and 
observed career possibilities as Air 
Force officers. 

Cadet LaPierre is a student at 
Notre Dame University 



CALL ME BEFORE 
SOMETHING 



IS 



HAPPENS 



Joseph M. Doherty Insurance Agency, Inc. 
518 Hancock Street, Quincy. 472-1224 
LIFE - BUSINESS • PERSONAL - AUTO 




H 



Ihursday, July 16. 1981 Quincy Sun Page II 



Sons Whip Fathers 
At Koch Family Picnic 



The Koch Club held its 34th 
annual family picnic recently at 
Pageant Field with the sons 
defeating the fathers 17-5 in the 
baseball game that highlights the 
event each year. 

The mothers held the 
daughters to a 5-5 tie in their 
annual softball contest. 

William Eaton and Debra Koch 
won the adult egg-tossing contest 
with Richard Schaetzl and Simone 
Koch runnersup. 

In other events: 
Races 

Boys under 5 - 1 . Keith Berry. 
2. Steven MacDougall, 3. Peter 
Bouchie. 

Girls under 5-1. Patricia 
Bertucci, 2. Kelly Roach. 3. Gena 
Bouchie. 

Boys, 5 to 6 - 1 . John Svagdis, 
2. Louis Bertucci, 3. Michael 
MacDougall. 

Girls, 5 to 6 - 1. Jessica 
Murphy, 2. Janine Coswick, 3. 
Danielle Perry. 

Boys, 7 to 8 - 1 . David Gamsby, 

2. Edward Costello, 3. Kevin 
Walsh. 

Girls, 7 to 8 - 1. Angel 
Favaloro, 2. Jolene Barry, 3. 
Kelly Gott. 

Boys, 9 to 10 - 1. Kevin 
MacDougall, 2. David Marinilli, 

3. Michael Shields. 



Girls, 9 to 10- 1. Karen West, 
2. Loretta Perry, 3. Sheila Healy. 

Boys, 11 to 12 - 1. Andrew 
Taylor, 2. Joseph West, 3. Jimmy 
McGrath. 

Girls, 11 to 12 - 1. Kathy 
Thornton and Chandra Berry 
(tie), 3. Christine Rodgers. 
Home Run Hitting 

Boys, 5 to 6 - 1 . Patrick Shea, 2. 
Louis Bertucci. 

Girls, 5 to 6 - 1. Jessica 
Murphy, 2. Patricia Bertucci. 

Boys, 7 to 8-1. Kevin Walsh. 

Girls, 7 to 8 - 1 . Jolene Barry, 2. 
Angela Favaloro. 

Boys, 9 to 10 - 1. Kevin 
MacDougall, 2. Sean Burke. 

Girls, 9 to 10- 1. Jiyon Park, 2. 
Karen West. 

Boys. 11 to 12 - 1. Andrew 
Taylor, 2. Jimmy McGrath. 

Girls, 11 to 12 - 1. Kathy 
Thornton, 2. Corinne West. 
Basketball 

Boys, 3 through 7-1. Steven 
Baker. 

Girls, 5 through 7-1. Shirley 
West. 

Boys, 8 through 10-1. Dave 
Gamsby. 

Girls, 8 through 10-1. Karen 
West. 

Boys, 11 through 13-1. Joe 
West. 

Girls. 11 through 13 - Chandra 
Berry. 




■ ■■■■ 



WINNERS in the Koch Club Home Run Hitting contest were, from left, front, Kevin Walsh, 8; Jessica 
Murphy, 5; Patrick Shea, 6; Jolene Barry, 8. Back row, Andy Taylor, 12; Kathy Thorton, 12; JiYon Park, 10; 
and Kevin MacDougall, 9. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by llan> (iillooly) 

William Golden Receives Harvard Degree 



William B. Golden of Quincy 
was recently awarded a Masters 
Degree in Public Administration 
from Harvard University. 

Golden, a Quincy attorney, 
received his bachelors from Yale 
University and his J.D. from the 
Law School of Boston University. 
While at the Kennedy School of 



Government, Golden concen- 
trated in the areas of Energy and 
Environmental management. 

Golden has served as a staff 
member in the White House and 
assisted in drafting legislation 
which created the United States 
Environmental Protection 



Agency. He worked for E. P. A. for 
several years as an assistant to 
the Administrator. He has also 
worked for the Department of 
Community Affairs as a National 
Institute of Health Scholar. 
Recently, Golden has served as 
the president of the Squantum 
Community Association. 



PATIOS & WALKWAYS 

SPECIAL VACATION 

OFFER 

SAVE 20% 

(EFFECTIVE UNTIL JULY 31, 1981) 



£ 



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and Construction Corp. 

LANDSCAPE, CONCRETE & ASPHALT CONSTRUCTION 

CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE 

472-2000 





What's New at Wendy's? 
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special sauce served on a 
warm bulky roll $1.85 



Buy a special bacon burger, 
and get an "all you can eat 
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onions, cauliflower etc. 



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Pa^e 12 Quincy Sun Thursday. July 16. I9SI 



Pageant Friday Night 

29 To Compete For Miss Quincy Bay Crown 



Twenty-nine South Shore 
young women will be competing 
for the title of Miss Quincy Bay of 
1981 and more than $4,000 in 
prizes Friday M *9:30 p.m. in 
downtown Quincy. 

The beauty pageant, highlight of 
the annual Quincy Sidewalk 
Bazaar, will be held on a portable 
toardwalk in front of the Hancock 
Bank on Hancock St. 

The new queen, who will be 
crowned by last year's winner 
Tracy L. Hart of Quincy, will reign 
over Quincy Bay Race Week Aug. 
12-16 and win the lion's share of 
the prizes. The three runnersup 
will also share in the prizes. 

The pageant is co-sponsored by 
the Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association and 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association. 

Master of ceremonies for the 
third year will be Tom Kennedy. 
WHDH radio personality. Music 
will be by Baron Hugo and his 
orchestra. 

The pageant committee has been 
notified that Governor Edward 
King is planning to make a guest 
appearance at this year's event. 



Avi Nelson, radio talk show 
host, will fill the newly created 
"celebrity" slot on the panel of 
judges. 

Joining Nelson on the panel of 
judges will be Nancy Meyers, Miss 
Quincy Bay of 1979; Ron Zooleck, 
executive director of the South 
Shore Chamber of Commerce; 
Bernie Reisberg, president of the 
QCBPA; Bob Hutcheon, president 
of the Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association. 

Contestants will be judged in 
evening gown and swim suit 
competition and for beauty and 
poise. They will be escorted by 
commodores of the Quincy Bay 
Race Week associated yacht clubs. 

Pat Jones, assistant to the 
president at the Home Town Bank, 
Newton, is pageant chairman. 

The Neighborhood Club of 
Quincy hosted the annual dinner 
party for the contestants last 
Friday. 

The pageant, which has as a rain 
date Saturday at 4:30 p.m., has 
drawn more than 90 contestants 
from 15 South Shore towns in the 
past three years. Crowd estimates 
have been in excess of 20,000. 



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Orange 1.19 



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Toko SI. Ann • Rood wMch It opposite the melngole to Veteran • Stadium. 

Open 7 Days — These cash n' carry prices good thru Sunday 




TRACY HART, Miss Quincy Bay 
of 1980 will crown her successor 
Friday night. 



The contestants, in alphabetical 
order, are: 

- Jacquelyn A. Babcock, 21, Hull. 

- Donna A. Beady, 17, North 
Weymouth. 

- Jill M. Bodell, 23, South 
Weymouth. 

- Deborah M. Campanale, 18, 
Braintree. 

- Teresa M. Charron, 16, 
Weymouth. 

- Karen M. Corliss, 17, Quincy. 

- Cynthia J. Davies, 17, Braintree. 

- Beth E. Friedman, 17, 
Stoughton. 

- Denise A. Gagnon, 25, Quincy. 
-Beth G. Garvin, 18, Braintree. 

- Patricia A. Kane, 20, Hull. 

- Eva M. Kelly, 19, Milton. 

- Dawn A. Macleod, 16, Quincy. 

- Annette P. Nielsen, 20, Quincy. 



- Laura M. Noenickx, 20, Quincy. 

- Kathleen A. O'Malley, 2.1, 
Braintree. 

- Linda E. Petersen, 21, Quincy. 

- Stephanie A. Petz, 21, Quincy. 

- Colleen G. Quirk, 18, Quir.cy. 

- Ann C. Reilly, 19, South 
Weymouth. 

-Michelle A. Roosa, 19, 
Randolph. 

- Donna Sampson, 28, Marshfield. 

- Patricia M. Saxonis, 17, Milton. 

- Dawna A. Stitt, 17, Scituate. 

- Beth A. Strenge, 21, Wollaston. 

- Deborah J. Sutherland, 20. 
Hanover. 

- Diane M. West, 18, Brockton. 

- Cynthia A. Woomer, 20 
Brockton. 

- Jean L. Zdankowski, 19, Nortr 
Quincy. 



35 Booths, Displays At Bazaar 



Thirty-two stores and local 
organizations are sponsoring 35 
booths and others will have 
sidewalk displays during this 
week's QCBPA Sidewalk Bazaar 
in downtown Quincy. 

Booths have been set up for: 
Colman's, Crouts Bike Shop, 
Casual Concepts (2), South Shore 
Army and Navy Store, Train 
Store, Caricatures, Norman's 
Armv and Navv Store. Beacon 



Fabrics, Project Vital, Survival, 
St. Boniface Church. 

Jason's, Quincy Police Crime 
Prevention, Ryder's, Tag's (2), 
Shoe Trap, Civil Defense, Jewelry 
Factory Outlet, Eileen's, South 
Shore Mental Health Quincv 
Junior College Yankee Energy 
(2). 

Friendly Family Center, 
Marine Corps League, South 



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NO SCRUBBING 
SPRAY MILDEW STAINS AWAY 



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PAINT AND %^ DECORATING CENTER 

FOR A BRIGHTER WORLD AROUND YOU 

1 39 Water St., Quincy 773-7707 




Political Advertisement 



Political Advertisement 



Shore Halfway House, Second 
Time Around. Big J Sub Shop, 
Baskin Robbins, City Hospital 
and Bay State Ambulance, St. 
Jeromes Church, Hart's Jewelry, 
Quincy Eye Associates. 

Stores and organizations that 
will have other sidewalk displays 
include: 

Book Haven, Central Baptist 
Church, the High Rise, Remick's, 
Tempo Fashions. Lerners. 
Cummings, Woolworth's, 

Barker's, Child World, Pewter 
Pot, Edison Shoes, Dunkin' 
Donuts, Stone's Jewelry. 

Roger's Jewelry, Caesar's 
Delicatessen, Creative Flowers, 
Reliable Shoe, Hancock Tobacco, 
Sawyer's, Napoli Pizza, Bernie's 
Modern Formal, Phase II, the 
Bargain Center, Miller's Shoes. 

Selton Turner Advertising 
Agency will have a display at 
which a blindfold test will be 
given to determine the difference 
between Pepsi and Coca Cola. A 
limited number of balloons and 
T-shirts will be available. 

South Shore Buick will have six 
new cars on display at special 
sidewalk prices, and Quirk Ford 
also will have cars on hand. 

Political Advertisement 



It's Going To Be 
A Long Hot Summer 



Many Quincy residents 
will be on vacation during 
July and August. Council- 
lor Frank McCauley 
wishes all Quincy 
residents a safe enjoyable 
summer season. Frank 
McCauley isn't taking a 
vacation this summer — 
Frank is running for 
Mayor of Quincy. 

Elect 

City Councillor 




Frank McCauley 

Full Time Mayor of Quincy 

'His Special Interest Is You" 



The McCauley For Mayor Committee 
John B. Powers Chairman 
99 Lenox St., Quincy 



Thursday. July 16, 1**1 Quincy Sun P»|e 13 



Over #4,000 In Prizes For Beauty Pageant Winners 



Miss Quincy Bay of 1981 and 
her four runners-up will share 
more than $4,000 in savings bonds, 
gift certificates and merchandise as 
prizes. 

Beauty pageant prizes will be: 

• A $50 savings deposit from 
Presidential Co-operative Bank. 

• A $50 savings bond from 
Hancock Bank & Trust. 

• A $50 savings bond from 
Norfolk County Trust. 

• A $50 savings bond from Old 
Colony Bank & Trust. 

• A $50 savings bond from 
Quincy Co-operative Bank. 

• A $50 savings bond from 
Quincy Savings Bank. 

• A $50 savings bond from 
Anodyne Medical Services. 

• A $50 savings bond from 
Senator Paul Harold. 

• A $50 savings bond from 
Montilio's Bakery. 

• A $50 savings bond from 
Beacon Fabrics. 

• A $50 gift certificate from 
Jason's Luggage and Music Shop. 

• A $50 gift certificate from the 
Joy of Movement Center. 

• A $50 gift certificate from 
Ryder's Curtains and Draperies. 

• A $25 gift certificate from 
Quinwell Travel. 

• A $25 gift certificate from 
The Bargain Center. 

• A $25 gift certificate from 
Cummings. 

• A $25 gift certificate from 
Frantic Framers. 

• A $25 gift certificate from 
A.E. Goodhue Co. 

• A $25 gift certificate from 
Tags Discount Furniture 'and 
Sleep Shop. 

• A $25 gift certificate from 
Yankee Energy Saver. 

• A $25 gift certificate from 

Rosemary Cullen 
Miss Teenage 
Houghs Neck 

Rosemary Cullen, 17 year old 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Emmett 
Cullen of 77 Spring St., was 
crowned Miss Teenage Houghs 
Neck Saturday at LaBrecque 
Field. 

The competition concluded field 
day activities held by the Houghs 
Neck Community Council. 

Runners-up were Donna 
Elsmore, 14, and Patti Leonard, 
16. Trophies and a cash award 
were given. 

Elaine Bergstrom was in charge 
of the event. Judges were City 
Council President Leo J. Kelly, 
Councillor-at-Large Francis X. 
McCauley and John Murphy. 

Amy Gibbons, Amy DiBona 
and Kristy Cheney won awards for 
decorated doll carriages; Michael 
Cheney, Carrie Hughes, Jenna 
Nolan and Sarah Edwards, for 
bicycles; Douglas Nolan, Wendy 
Berry and Patricia Berry for 
"horribles". 

2 Residents On 
Bowdoin Dean's List 

Two Quincy residents, Thomas 
W. Rand of 49 Edison Park and 
Melissa G. Verrochi of 46 Cranch 
St.. have been named to the 
dean's list for the second 
semester at Bowdoin College, 
Brunswick, Me. 

Both are members of the Class 
of 1984. 



Norfolk County 
Bar Association 

Lawyer reference service will 
help in selecting an attorney. 

If you need a lawyer and don't 
know one, call us and you Mill be 
referred to an attorney in your 
area who will talk to you for a 
nominal fee for the first visit. 

P. O. Box 66, Dedham, Mass. 
326-8699 

Call 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



Lerner Shops. 

• A $20 gift certificate from 
Photo Quick. 

• A $20 gift certificate from 
Edson Shoe. 

• A $20 gift certificate from 
Remick's of Quincy. 

• A $20 gift certificate from 
South Shore Army & Navy. 

• A $20 gift certificate from 
Kincaide Furniture. 

• A $15 gift certificate from 
Phase II Jewelry. 

• Four, $10 gift certificates 
from Montilio's Bakery. 

• Four, $10 gift certificates 
from Baskin Robbins. 

• A $10 gift certificate from 
Miller Shoes. 

• A $10 gift certificate from 
Norman's Army & Navy. 

• A $10 gift certificate from 
Paperama. 

• A $10 gift certificate from 



Shoe Trap. 

• A $10 gift certificate from 
Hanlon Shoe. 

• A $10 gift certificate from 
Casual Concepts. 

• A $10 gift certificate from 
Import Village. 

• Two $10 gift certificates from 
Sawyer's Campus Shop. 

• A $10 gift certificate from 
Marvel Beauty Shop. 

• A $10 gift certificate from Big 
J Sandwich Shop. 

• Two, $10 gift certificates 
from Barker's. 

• Dinner for two at Mr. Kelly's 
from Burgin Platner and Co. 
Insurance. 

• Luncheon for two from 
Caesar's Restaurant. 

• Luncheon or dinner for two 
from Colonial 1600. 

• Five, dinners for two from 
McDonald's. 



• Two free pizzas from Napoli 
Pizzeria. 

• Dinner for two from The 
High Rise. 

• Luncheon for two from 
California. 

• Five tickets to a Red Sox 
game from South Shore Bank. 

• A portrait from Miller 
Studios. 

• Five readings from Regina 
Russell Tea Room. 

• Five rentals from Bernie's 
Modern Formal. 

• A Speedo swimsuit from 
Colman's Sporting Goods. 

• A presentation bouquet from 
Creative Flowers. 

• A framed print from 
Framer's Workshop. 

• A studylamp from Granite 
City Electric. 

• A $40 sports watch from 
Hart's Jewelry. 



• A sterling necklace and 
braclet from Jewelry Factory 
Outlet. 

• Pageant crown and trophy 
from Rogers Jewelry. 

• A bouquet of roses from 
Roy's Flowers. 

• A transistor radio from 
South Shore TV. 

• Six redbooks from Taj Coin 
& Stamps. 

• A lighted make-up mirror 
from Woolworth. 

• Two tickets to the South 
Shore Music Circus from The 
Quincy Sun. 

• A chaise lounge and chair 
from The Patriot Ledger. 

• A free scholarship from 
Sabina's Beauty Academy. 

• A hair styling and $30 value^ 
blower from Hairplace I. 

• A $5 gift certificate from A 
Book Haven. 




* Thursday, July 16 



Big Bird 






(Courtesy of Quincy Eye 


All Day 


Roving Troubadour 


Associates) 






Dunking Booth 


All Day 


Near Colman's 


Hamburglar (McDonald's) 






Special Handouts 


10- 10 


Roving Troubadour 


Moonwalk 


All Day 


Near Colman's 


Professional Organ Grinder 


Intermittently 


Roving Troubadour 


with Trained Monkey 


Throughout the Day 




Quincy Eye Associates 






Eye Screening Clinic 


10-5 


Near QCBPA 


Cheezo the Clown 


2-3 


Near Avco 


Burger King Magic Show 


2 Shows - 
3:00-4:15 


Near QCBPA 


Dairo, Olof & Eddie 


4-5 


Near Avco 


Joy of Movement 


7:30 - 8:00 


Near Avco 


Milton Band 


7:30 - 9:00 


Roving Troubadour 


Young World Exhibition 


7 - 7:30 p.m. 

8 - 8:30 p.m. 


Near QCBPA 


* Friday, July 17 




Big Bird 






(Courtesy of Quincy Eye 


All Day 


Roving Troubadour 


Associates) 






Dunking Booth 


All Day 


Near Colman's 


Moonwalk 


All Day 


Near Colman's 


Professional Organ Grinder 


Intermittently 


Roving Troubadour 


with Trained Monkey 


Throughout the Day 




Quincy Eye Associates 






Eye Screening Clinic 


10-5 


Near QCBPA 


Sea Brite - Dreamboats 






Autographing Records 


Afternoon 


Jason's 


Burger King Magic Show 


3 Shows 






1:00 -2:15-3:20 


Near QCBPA 


Valerie Kaan 






Ventriloquist 


2-3 


Near Avco 


Paco the Clown 


4-5 


Near Avco 


Baron Hugo 






Concert 


7:30 - 9 


Near QCBPA 


Beauty Pageant 


9:15 


Hancock Bank 


* Saturday, July 18 




Big Bird 






(Courtesy of Quincy Eye 


All Day 


Roving Troubadour 


Assoc.) 






Dunking Booth 


All Day 


Near Colman's 


Moonwalk 


All Day 


Near Colman's 


Professional Organ Grinder 


Intermittently 




with Trained Monkey 


Throughout the Day 


Roving Troubadour 1 


Quincy Eye Associates 




fe. v ^— "v v™N *—v w— •* A 


Eye Screening Clinic 


10-12 


Near QCBPA 




Over 60 colorful 
selling & activity booths 

QDOWNTOWN 

(§@NrTS® 




ism t**x isionai »S'^>t:i*ToM 



Pafc 14 Quincy Sun Thursday. July 16. 1981 

Lisa Salvaggio Springfield Graduate 

Lisa M. Salvaggio, 35 Wesson recently at Spnngheld at 
Ave. West Quincy was among 736 Springfield College's 95th 
graduates to receive a degree commencement. 




SECRETARIAL SERVICE 
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Personalizing Multiple 

Letters 

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NOTARY PUBLIC 

440 Hancock St. 



Quincy 



471-1495 



titz&erald'o 

Dresses of Distinction 



The Shop 
will open 

Thursday 
July 16th 



Dresses 

and 

Coordinated 

Fashion 

Sportswear 




The same 

distinctive styles 

that you are 

used to finding 

at 



t*itz&erald'§ 



For 
July 
Sundresses* 

reg *24 '" 

now $17.50 

Hours: 10-5:30 Mon-Sat. 



At The Granary 

14 North Street 

Hingham, MA 

749-2242 



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PhoneS:472-9687 471-4840 

Specialist in precision & geometric 
hair cutting 



Cortese Helps Clean Pagnano Shelter 



Joseph F. Cortese, a candidate 
for City Council from Ward 2, 
protested to the MBTA the 
unclean conditions of the waiting 
shelter at Pagnano Towers in 
Quincy Point. 

He said he wound up taking 
matters into his own hands. 

"I was informed," he said, "of 
this deplorable condition by 
several of the seniors who reside 
in the Towers three weeks ago 
and since that time I have called 
the MBTA at least twice a week. 

"Every time I called the 
MBTA, I was consistently 
informed by their spokesperson 
that the situation would be taken 
care of as it is the responsibility of 
the MBTA to maintain these 
sheltered bus stops." 

But nothing was done. 

So, over the Fourth of July 
weekend, Cortese said he, Phyllis 
and Frank O'Brian of Pagnano 
Towers and Richard Sangelier, 
went out and cleaned up the 
shelter themselves. 



"When the MBTA is looking 
for a rate hike," said Cortese, 
"I'm sure they will think nothing 
of expecting this increase to come 
out of our pockets. 

"But when a request for main- 
tenance of the bus stop is made 
by residents of Ward 2, it seems 
we have to wait while the litter 
continues to mount or clean it up 
ourselves." 

Cortese said he had photos 
taken of the bus shelter litter and 
will consult with the Health 
Department to see if the 
unsanitary condition inside the 
shelter warrants condemnation 

Xet Prop. 
Urges 

Gregory P. Brooks, a candidate 
for the City Council at large, says 
the two main issues that this 
campaign will focus on are 
downtown revitalization and 



THOMAS J. KENNEY, M.D. 

Announces the Opening of an 

Additional Office 

And His Association With 

JOHN W. DALTON, M.D. 

For the Diagnosis And Treatment Of 

DISEASES Of The GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 

LIVER AND PANCREAS IN ADULTS AND CHILDREN 

SOUTH SHORE GASTROINTESTINAL ASSOC. 



Seton Medical Building 

2110 Dor (he*fer Ave., Dor. 

296-9510 



65 Columbian St. 

South Weymouth 

331-4507 



until the MBTA cleans it. 

On his way home, said Cortese, 
he and Sangelier also removed 
debris from another bus shelter 
near the Quincy Point Congrega- 
tional Church. It included beer 
bottles and cans. 

"I feel there is no excuse that 
would allow this kind of 
negligence on the part of those 
responsible for maintenance of 
these areas," he said. 

"I intend to pursue it to the 
fullest to see that this problem is 
brought to the attention of those 
who should oversee and eliminate 
it." 

2V 2 Work,' 
Brooks 

"letting Proposition 2 1 /: work for 
the people." 

Brooks reaffirmed his stand on 
Prop. 2V: during a weekly meeting 
of his campaign staff at the Knotty 
Pine Restaurant in Ouincv Point. 

"I was for it back in November 
and 1 support it now," he said. 
"This fiscal insanity which hurts 
the working class more than any 
other group must come to a halt. 
The 1980s will be known as an era 
of fiscal restraint." 

Brooks is a member of Citizens 
for Limited Taxation, the group 
that sponsored and promoted 
Prop. 2 1 /: to victory last 
November. 

Brooks also told his campaign 
staff to expect many other 
questions to be raised during the 
next two months because of the 
many different views of Quincy 
voters. 



See 



SOUTH SHORE 
SAVINGS BANK 



WEy-bANkj the 1st 

for 30, 60, 89 day— 

Repurchase Agreements 

High Rate • Guaranteed Return • Fully Secured 



15.55% 



Rate as of July 15, 1981 
Subject to daily change. 



OH ?0,UUU investment) 

for 30-89 days 



The Repurchase Agreement is not a savings account or deposit and therefore is not insured by the Deposit 
Insurance Fund of Massachusetts. However, it is secured by United States Treasury or Agency securities in our 
portfolio. 

'Annual Percentage Rale Weymouth Savings Bank •■ serves the right to modity or terminate this ofler at anytime Redemption pnortomatuntyare 
not allowed interest will not be paid beyond the maturity date ot the agreement Interest is calculated on a 365 day year is payable to maturity, and is 
not compounded Individuals investing in Repurchase Agreements should consult their tax advisor 

(call today for latest ratej 

6 mo. & 30 mo. Money Market Certificates 

6 month certificates July 14 - July 20 

15.223% H 14.480% 



$10,000 minimum deposit 

Federal regulations prohibit compounding interest withdrawal of principal not permitted prior to maturity. 

♦Equivalent rate based on renewal of principal-, '< »* M int erest principal on deposit 

interest at end of six month periods at the same rat-. interest compounded continuously. 

OFFER SUBJECT TO WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE - ALL DEPOSITS INSURED IN FULL 

30 month certificates available 
only $500 minimum deposit. 



383 Bridge St., North Weymouth 
372 Quincy Ave., Braintree 
295 Washington St., Weymouth 
47 Washington St., Weymouth Landing 




137-2700 



Thunday, July 16, 1981 Quincy Sun Pace 15 



Still In Race 

Morrisette 
Bounces Back 

After 4 Losses 



Despite losing four games in a 
row for the first time since Ray 
Cattaneo took over as coach, the 
Morrisette Legion baseball team 
finds itself just one game behind 
Weymouth and Norwell in the 
Zone 6 Division Brace. 

Morrisette, which snapped its 
four-game losing streak Sunday 
with an 8-6 win over Weymouth, 
has a 9-6 record, while Weymouth 
and Norwell are 10-5. 

Morrisette won its protest of a 4- 
3 loss to Norwell and was to learn 
Tuesday night if the game would 
be played over or continued from 
where the game ended. 

Morrisette, which played 
Wollaston last night (Wednesday), 
will play at Randolph Friday at 6 
o'clock, Monday will host 
Hingham at 8 under the lights at 
Adams Field and Tuesday will be 
home to Brockton at 8 at Adams. 

Morrisette scored three runs in 
the seventh inning, two on a Brian 
Reale homer, to top Weymouth 
and end its losing streak. With 
Morrisette trailing, 6-5, in the 
seventh, John Balzano drove in a 
run with a triple and scored on 
Reale's home run. Mark Milrane 
had two hits and two RBl's. 

Gary DiNardo went thedistance 
for the win, allowing six hits and 
striking out six. 

In its previous game Morrisette 
had bowed to Brainlree, 7-2, for 
the fourth loss in a row, as 
Braintree took advantage of six 
Morrisette errors to score all its 
runs in the first three innings. 

Morrisette was blanked until the 
sixth when it scored both runs, 
Millane doubling home Marty 
McLoughlin and Jim Bandera. 

A bright spot for Morrisette was 
the pitching of 16-year-old Kevin 
Whalen, who retired the last six 
Braintree batters. 

Earlier Morrisette was blanked 
by Norwell, 2-0, as it was held to 
four hits by Kevin Pizzi. 

Wollaston, which has come 
along fast after a slow start, edged 
Canton, 7-6, in its last start for its 
fourth win of the season. 

Andy Eames had three hits and 
drove in two runs and Rich 
Hallberg picked up the win in 
relief. 

Bobby O'Brien and Danny 



Dunn had two hits each and Jim 
Kelly, Glenn Segalla and Mike 
Venna had one each. 

In its previous game Wollaston 
rallied in the seventh inning to tie 
Weymouth, 2-2, in a game called 
because of darkness. 

Earlier Wollaston had turned in 
one of its finest performances of 
the season to top Brockton's 
defending state champions, 7-2, as 
Hallberg pitched a six-hitter. 

Jimmy Hensley drove in two 
runs, Jim Sullivan had a two-run 
homer, Steve Belcastro drove in 
two with a bases loaded single and 
Eames added an RBI for 
Wollaston, which played a strong 
defensive game. 

Wollaston will host Hingham 
Friday night at 8 at Adams and 
Monday will be at Milton at 6 
o'clock. 

Quincy, which has had its 
troubles this summer, turned in an 
excellent performance last week to 
defeat Holbrook, 6-1. 

Quincy. trailing, 1-0, scored all 
its runs in a big fifth inning. It had 
six hits, three for extra bases. Jim 
DiPietro led off the inning by 
reaching on an error, Steve 
Sacchetti singled. Bob Ready 
tripled for the winning runs, John 
Costigan scored Ready with a 
double, stole third and scored on 
pinch hitter Bill Gray's single, Paul 
Quigley singled and Sean Martin 
doubled for the final two runs. 

Costigan pitched a two-hitter, 
struck out seven and walked three. 

Quincy had bowed to Norwell, 
7-5, with Quigley sparking the 
Quincy attack with three hits. 

Quincy will play at Canton 
Friday at 6 o'clock and Monday 
will be at Braintree at 6. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 



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By John Valante 



HEED SMALL 
CRAFT WARNINGS 



According to the Coast Guard, 
knowingly taking a small craft out 
despite the fact that bad weather 
threatens is unforgiveable. 

One teenager was so eager to 
show off his new boat that he 
took two friends out in it, despite 
choppy water and the fact that 
the small craft warnings were 
displayed. That meant winds of at 
least 38 mpli and that all small 
boats should remain docked. 
While the trio was out, gale 
warnings went up, but it was too 
late for the youngsters to heed 
them. The next day their wrecked 
boat was found on a beach will all 
three occupants dead inside. 

A small pleasure craft is not 
built to withstand high winds and 
heavy waves and even a summer 
shower can wreak havoc; for a 
few big waves taken broadside can 



capsize a cabin cruiser. If you 
insist on ignoring the advice to 
stay put during bad weather, at 
least stay close to shore if a storm 
threatens so you can beat a quick 
retreat. 

* # * 
This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARM AC Y, 
406 Hancock St., No. Quincv 

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: 
Charge Accounts 
Delivery Service 
Insurance Receipts 
Free Gift Wrapping 
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Tax Records on Request 
Utility Payments Mon. Thru Sat 9 
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Phone: 328-3426 




THE CARDINALS, champions of St, John's Little League. Front, left to right, Jimmy Thomas, Jay 
Hartnett, John Cicerone, Mike Thomas, Peter Nason and George Moran. Back, Coach Paul Ruozzi, David 
Gardiner, Kevin Devonshire, John Nee, Stephen Fox, Keith O'Sullivan, Keith CannifTand Coach Jack Nee. 
The championship trophy has been named in honor of Fred Mariani, the late coach of three championship 
teams in the league. 

(Quincy Sun Pholti by Mary O'Kvefje) 

Sun Sports 

Track Club Scores 105 Points 
In Women's Kendall Classic 



The Quincy Track Club turned 
in its usual good performance last 
Saturday and Sunday in the fourth 
annual Kendall Women's Classic 
at Boston College. 

The QTC scored 105 points, its 
most ever, placed third in the New 
England division and sixth overall 
among teams from all over the 
country. The club received $500 in 
developmental grant money from 
the Kendall Company. 

In the 7-under division Meghan 
Farrell won thesoftball throw with 
a record toss of 75 feet and five- 
year old Regina Murphy placed 
third in the long jump at 8-3. 

In 8-9 Deirdre Murphy and 



Fran Rodgers placed 2-3 in the 
long jump, Cindy Bonner was 
second in the 400 and Kim Werth 
took second in 'he soft ball throw. 

In 10-11 Laura Cirella took 
third in the 800 with a fine 2:34.3 
effort. 

In 1 2- 1 3 the QTC scored well in 
the high jump with Tracy Parker 
third, Julie Supple fourth, Tracy 
Wilson fifth and Mary Beth 
Bonner sixth. 

In the 12-13 1600-meter relay 
Quincy's team of Terry Parker, 
Tracy Coull, Geraldine Murphy 
and Beth Tracy placed sixth. 

In 16-17 Lauren Andrews won 
the shot put at 40-3, with Michelle 



Millane third. Lianne Supple 
placed second in the high jump, 
clearing five feet, her best ever, and 
the relay team of Nancy 
McCarthy, Deirdre Donovan, 
Kathy Stevens and Lianne Supple 
placed fourth in 4:03. 

In 18 and over Linda Sell took 
fifth in the shot put. 

The club competed in the Jesse 
Owens finals last night 
(Wednesday) and will have several 
athletes in the Hershey state finals 
Saturday and the AAU Regional 
Junior Olympics, hopefully 
qualifying a number of athletes for 
national competition. 



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P»«e 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 1981 



10 Kilometer Road Race Aug. 6 



The South Shore Council on 
Alcoholism and the Quincy Youth 
Commission will hold their annual 
10 kilometer (6.2-mile) road race 
Aug. 6 at 6 p.m. starting and 
finishing at Veterans Memorial 
Stadium, with one lap inside the 
stadium. 

The race is held to benefit young 
people with drinking problems. 

The pre-entry fee is $3.00 (prior 
to Aug. 6) and the day of race fee 



(from 4 to 5:30 at the stadium) is 
$4.00. T-shirts will be presented to 
the first 200 applicants. 

Facilities include locker rooms, 
rest rooms, water stations, mile 
markers, mile split times and cold 
refreshments after the race. 

Trophies, placqucs and medals 
will go to the first four finishers in 
each of the following categories for 
male and female runners: IS and 
under, 16-19, 20-39 and 40 and 



over. 

All runners will receive 
certificates and merchandise prizes 
will be drawn after the race. 

Sponsors include Wollaston 
Credit Union, 7-Up Bottling Co., 
Bay Bank/Norfolk Trust. 
Braintree Co-operative Bank and 
Hancock Bank and Trust. 

For entry applications and 
further information call South 
Shore Council on Alcoholism, 
472-6027. 



Beach Swimming Schedule 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department announces the 
following schedule of swimming 
instructions for the city's beaches 
during the week of July 20-24. 

Monday. July 20, beach hours 
are from 12 noon to 5 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer I, 12 
noon; non-swimmer 2. 12:30p.m.; 
beginner I. 4 p.m.; beginner 2, 4:30 
p.m.; advanced beginner, 3:30 
p.m.; intermediate. I p.m.; 
swimmer, 1:30 p.m.; basic rescue 
and advanced life saving, 2 p.m. to 
3:30 p.m. 

Tuesday. July 21, beach hours 
are from 12 noon to 5 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer I, 12 



noon; non-swimmer 2, 12:30p.m.; 
beginner I, 4 p.m.; beginner 2, 4:30 
p.m.; advanced beginner, I p.m.; 
intermediate. 1:30 p.m.; swimmer, 
2 p.m.; basic rescue and advanced 
Life saving. 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Wednesday. July 22, beach 
hours are from I p.m. to 6 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer I. I p.m.; 
non-swimmer 2, 1:30 p.m.; 
beginner I. 5 p.m.; beginner 2, 5:30 
p.m.; advanced beginner, 4:30 
p.m.. intermediate, 2 p.m.; 
swimmer, 2:30 p.m.; basic rescue 
and advanced life saving, 3 p.m. to 
4:30 p.m. 

Thursday, July 23, beach hours 
are from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. The 



schedule: Non-swimmer I, 2 p.m.; 
non-swimmer 2, 2:30 p.m.; 
beginner I, 3 p.m.; beginner 2, 3:30 
p.m.; advanced beginner, 4 p.m.; 
intermediate, 4:30 p.m.; swimmer. 
6:30 p.m.; basic rescue and 
advanced life saving. 5 p. m. to 6:30 
p.m. 

Friday, July 24, beach hours are 
from 3p.m. to 8p.m. The schedule: 
Non-swimmer I, 3 p.m.; non- 
swimmer 2, 3:30p.m.; beginner I, 4 
p.m.; beginner 2. 4:30 p.m.; 
advanced beginner, 5 p.m.; 
intermediate, 7 p.m.; swimmer, 
7:30 p.m.; basic rescue and 
advanced life saving. 5:30p.m. to 7 
p.m. 



Adult Tennis Lessons To Start July 27 



The Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment announces it's second 
session of Adult Tennis Lessons 
to be held at the outdoor Vo-Tech 
Tennis Courts. 

Five week classes will be 
offered in Beginners and Inter- 
mediate levels beginning 
Monday, July 27. 



A registration fee of $8 which 
covers five one hour lessons will 
be payable upon registration 
which is now taking place on a 
first come first serve basis at the 
Recreation Office, 100 Southern 
Artery. For further information 
contact the Recreation Office, 
773-1380, ext. 204. 



The class schedule: 

Monday, 6-7 p.m., 7-8 p.m., 
Beginners. 

Tuesday, 6-7 p.m., Beginners; 
7-8 p.m., Intermediate. 

Wednesday, 6-7 p.m., Be- 
ginners; 7-8 p.m.. Intermediate. 

Thursday, 6-7 p.m.. Beginners; 
7-8 p.m., Intermediate. 



Rehab Work To Start On Kincaide Courts 



Rehabilitation work on the 
tennis courts in Kincaide Park. 

mmmmmm 



South Quincy, will begin in late 
July or early August through the 



Propane Gas 

Cylinders filled on our premises 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Charm glow gas grills & accessories 
Available at special low prices 

South Shore Heating 
and Air Conditioning Inc. 

38 Greenwood Ave. 
E. Weymouth 337-6100 



Community Development Block 
Grant program. 

"We are presently completing 
the rehabilitation of Sterling 
Playground, through which the 
neighborhood will be provided 
with a new basketball court, 
running track and open play area," 
said City Councillor James A. 
Sheets. 

"The complement that 
successful project, we will be 
rehabilitating the Kincaide Park 
tennis courts, so that the residents 
of the area will be provided with a 
greater diversity of suitable and 
adequate recreation space." 



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Quincy Sun 

NEWSCARRIERS 

Wanted 



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or Apply In Person 



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1372 Hancock Street 
Quincy Square 



RECREATION 
ROUNDUP 






BEECHWOOD KNOLL- (Lori 
Kelly, Ricky Radzik) For the first 
two weeks of Recreation, we have 
had children display their talents in 
Arts & Crafts. The kids have made 
wood jewelry, God's Eyes, and 
projects with rocks. Karen 
Leonard, Alison Hurley, Kathy 
Watt, and Caroline Morash made 
very good God's Eyes. Caroline 
Morash and Debbie Forrester 
made some attractive wood 
jewelry. Laura Miceli looks like a 
very valuable player for the Senior 
Girls' Basketball team. Shannon 
Canty will be very helpful on the 
Junior Girls' Softball team. The 
Junior Boy's Baseball team has 
been working and practicing, led 
by ace pitcher Matt Hurley and the 
catching of Nathen James. 
Assistant Coach Robert Routier 
has been scouting new prospects 
for the team. Mike McGowen is 
away on vacation but hopes to be 
back to be one of our star players 
at third base. Mark Kelleher, 
David Zupkoska and Kevin 
Murphy are looking good for the 
Midget team. The children have 
also enjoyed Archery which is very 
popular. 

FENNO ST (Anne Schofield, 
Susan Celeta, Tom Quinn) A 
consistent turnout of 40 show- up 
at the park each day. Denise, the 
Arts and Crafts specialist visited 
the first day and was an instant 
success. Showing off their artistic 
talents were John McManus, 
Brian and Laurie Danna. Kelly 
Mitchell. Jennifer Jordan, Kerri 
Mitchell, Ken Forrester, Jean 
Callow, and Bryan McGilvray. 

Already the competition for 
Miss Fenno St. is keen. Vying for 
honors are Sheila Sullivan, 
Melanie Moffett, Claire Murphy, 
Crystal Moffett, Joelle Roden, 
Tricia Koski and Julie Marsters. 
These girls besides being beautiful 
and talented are exceptional 
athletes. 

Baseball and basketball, always 
a tradition of excellence at the 
Mount, continue as talent 
overflows. Starring for the Midget 
boys baseball team are Jay Eggers, 
Jamie and Chris Green, John 
O'Donnell, Dave McManus and 
Chris Jones. The Junior boys look 
strong. Jim Phelan. Scott 
Sacchetti, Kevin Caldwell, Van 
Leister, Adam McGregor, Dave 
Buckley, and Paul Murphyarejust 
a few of our multi-talented many. 
The senior boys, led by John 
Murphy, Bob Cralton, and Dave 
Duffy look to make a strong 
contribution to District One's 
senior boys baseball team. 

We also picked our girls' 
basketball team and had our first 
practice. Sheila Sullivan, Claire 
Murphy, Joelle Roden, Tricia 
Kaski are in our line-up so far. 

FORBES HILL (Tony Camillo 
and Lisa Morash) We had over 30 
kids sign up this week. Our Junior 
baseball team is looking very 
strong led by Dan Biagini who has 
been hitting the ball all over the 
park in practice. Also looking 
good for the juniors are Sean and 
Joe Gately and Steve Shoap who 
have been hitting well and are 
playing strong defense. Leading on 
our midget attack are Matthew 
Hennigan. Paul Segalla, and 
Jimmy Gately. 

We had three specialists visit us 
this week. On Thursday, Brian 
Downing stopped by with his 
bow for archery. Joe Gately 
was the Sharp Shooter for the day. 
Also visiting was Denise DeCarli, 



our Arts & Crafts specialist, and 
Gayle Kiley, our Music and 
Drama Specialist. Margo 
Hennigan and Maggie O'Donnell 
and Jenny Barron produced some 
very fine art work. Dan Biagini 
and Sean Gately showed great 
talent working with copper alt. 
Our Junior Girls softball team is 
looking strong. Some of our great 
hitters include Karen Miller, Jenny 
Barron, Deeane Ferrara, Sybil 
Morgan and Kerry Torney. 

MASS FIELDS (Chris King, 
Dean Zoia) Mass. Fields opened 
with a bang with more than 70 
children signing up. The midget 
baseball team looks like it is going 
to the city finals with Jim 
Maloney, Bob Kelly, Greg Runge, 
Danny Walty, Mike Walsh, 
Tommy Duddy, Robert Hubberb, 
and many of our all-stars. Our 
Juniors are getting ready for their 
first game on Wednesday against 
Fenno St. Playing for the juniors 
will be Joe and Jimmy Mulvey, 
Tony Orlando and Tony Losordo. 
Mass. Fields had a trip to the 
Racquetball Club which was a 
great success. Our pros include 
Leanne and Scott Fitzgerald, Tara 
and Nancy Linnehan, Karen 
Runge, Donna Stein, Elizabeth 
Holt and Missy Holt, Danny 
Walty, Steve Kelly and Mike 
Walsh. 

The Mass. Fields Junior Girls 
softball team is looking great this 
season with stars including, the 
Holt Sisters, Karen Nelson, Dawn 
Duncan, Brenda Warren, and 
Renee Lavesque. Our senior girls 
go against Beechwood Knoll on 
Friday morning and we're looking 
for a great game as our Star five 
basketball team leads the way with 
such big names as Karen Runge, 
Donna Stein and Nancy Linnehan. 
Wednesday around Mass. Fields is 
known as wild Wednesday which 
consists of the kids doing 
something different every 
Wednesday. This week we are 
having an Egg Throwing Contest! 

WOLLASTON (Mary Ken- 
nedy, Bill Timmins) This year 
Wollaston Park will field 
competitive teams in nearly every 
division and is expected to have a 
good year. 

The biggest hope for a 
championship bid is the Midget 
boys baseball team Dave 
boys baseball team led by Capts. 
Jimmy DiCarli and Martin 
Feeney. The infield is filled by 
Dave Thompson, Michael Tufts, 
Bob Flaherty, John Dunderdale, 
and Mike Grindly. In the outfield 
will be Jason Doyle and Mike 
Kelly and Harry Towie. 

The Juniors also have an 
excellent team and will be led by 
tri-Capts. Pat Feeney, Mike 
Cicerone and Kevin Jay. Brothers 
Scott and Mike Ceurvals, along 
with Peter Tufts, Phil Thompson 
and Joey Lawny will also provide 
leadership. 

These same teams are expected 
to do well in basketball. 

On the girl's side a senior team 
has been formed and is picked to 
win. A junior team is being 
formed, led by Mary Feeney and 
Robin Crooks. Also playing will 
be Laura White, Jessica McKeon 
and Barbara White. 

Besides sports, we have been 
busy with Arts & Crafts. Under the 
expert guidance of Denise DiCarli, 
we've made decoupage on rocks, 
God's Eyes and rag dolls. 



Summer Day Camp At YMCA 



The South Shore YMCA will 
conduct a summer day camp for 
children ages 3 to 6 over three two- 
week periods during July and 
August. 

Campers may attend two, three 
or five days a woek from July 6 to 
17, July 20 to 31 and Aug. 3 to 14. 
Camp runs from 8:45 a.m. to 12 



noon. Monday through Friday. 

Afternoon sitting is also 
available from 12 noon to 4 p.m. 

The camping program includes 
daily swim lessons, gymnastic 
instruction, arts and crafts, 
storytime, sing alongs and games. 

For more information, call 479- 
8500. 



Thursday, July 16, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 17 



unior League 



LaPierre Inducted Into 



Foley Rolls On In N.L., Commerce Hall Of Fame 

* I nc I aPiprrp iif Oiimev u/as U I tl T a\M f al bM 

Rotary, Gear Tied In A.L. 



Foley Chrysler-Plymouth, 
winner of the Quincy Junior 
Baseball League's National 
League, improved its record to 18- 
3 with two victories during the past 
week. 

Foley defeated Rotary's 
American League co-leaders, 5-2, 
behind the six-hit pitching of Chris 
Marshall, who struck out II, 
bringing his strikeout total to 103 
in 57 innings. He improved his 
record to 6-1 . Marshall also was on 
base three times with a single and 
two walks and scored two runs. 
Foley continues to be one of the 
top defensive teams in the league 
and again played errorless ball. 
Kyle Robertson did an 
outstanding job behind the plate in 
near- 100 degree heat and had a 
double and single. Jay DeBartolo 
and Tom Tagen had singles and 
Dan Biagini, Jim Dennis and 
DeBartolo scored runs. Chris 
Meyer, Sean Gately, Kevin Duffy 
and Bob Laracy turned in 
outstanding defensive plays. 



Foley's also romped over VFW, 
13-2, with DeBartolo improving 
his pitching record to 8-1, pitching 
a six-hitter and striking out seven, 
giving him 69 on the season. He 
didn't walk a batter. DeBartolo 
also had a single and scored three 
runs. 

Biagini had three singles and 
scored twice, Marshall had a 
double, walked twice and scored 
twice, Meyer had a double and 
single and played one of the best 
defensive games of the season at 
first base, Laracydrove in two runs 
with a bases loaded single up the 
middle and played well at second 
base, Mike Sanda and Sean Gately 
had a double each and scored a 
run, Duffy had a single and scored 
a run and made a brilliant play at 
third base and Robertson had two 
singles, scored twice and did 
another fine job catching. 

Foley's has scored 65 runs and 
allowed only 10 in the last 42 
innings. 

Rotary defeated Burgin Platner, 



1 1-4, behind the three-hit pitching 
of Steve Minichiello. Minichiello 
struck out seven and walked only 
one. 

Brian Mosher and Tom 
McDonald had first inning hits 
which, along with a walk and an 
error, gave Burgin a 3-0 lead. 

Rotary bounced back, pounding 
out 12 hits. Lead off batter Billy 
Burkhead had three hits and 
scored three runs, Mike Mullaney 
was on base four times, had a 
double and single and scored three 
runs, John Pennellatore had two 
singles, Robby Fitzgerald had a 
home run over the left field fence, 
Minichiello hit a tremendous blast 
which just missed being a homer 
and went for a standup double and 
he had another double, Phil 
Thompson lined a double off the 
left field fence and Tim Hall had a 
line single. 

Rotary and Boston Gear are tied 
for the American League lead with 
17-4 records. One game between 
the two is under protest and it has 
yet to be ruled upon. 



Junior League All-Star Game Friday 



Joe LaPierre of Quincy was 
recently inducted into the Boston 
High School of Commerce Hall of 
Fame. 

LaPierre graduated in 1948 
from Commerce, where he was an 
outstanding track star and was co- 
captain of track in his senior year. 
He won the mile in the state 
championship meet and went on to 
compete in the National AAU high 
school championship held at New 
York's Madison Square Garden. 
He won the mile in 4:33.6. 

LaPierre went to Georgetown 
University and continued his 
winning ways. Joe, along with Carl 
Joyce (another Commerce 
alumni), Joe Deady and Dave 
Boland, ran on the world-record 
setting two-mile relay team in the 

1951 Millrose Games. He won the 

1952 IC4A outdoor mile in 4: 12.4. 
He also won the 1953 IC4A indoor 
championship two-mile run in 
9:08.9. He was a tri-recipient of the 
Outstanding Track and Field 
Competitor Award in 1943 along 
with Joyce and Charles 
Cappozzolli. 

LaPierre was voted into the 
Georgetown Hall of Fame. 

Also inducted into the 
Commerce Hall of Fame at the 
first High School of Commerce 
Alumni Association Hall of Fame 




JOE LaPIERRE of Quincy was 
recently inducted into the Boston 
High School of Commerce Hall of 
Fame. 

meeting at Polcari's Restaurant in 
Boston were Joyce, class of 1948; 
John E. Powers, 1938, and Coach 
Doc Flemming, who coached 
major sports at Commerce from 
1921 through 1952. 

Commerce Alumni interested in 
receiving more information 
regarding the alumni association 
should call Bob Rodenat 472-8546 
or 577-2387. 



The Quincy Junior Baseball 
League's annual all-star game will 
be played Friday night at 8 under 
the lights at McCoy Field (Artery 
II) behind the kiddie park across 
from Veterans Memorial Stadium. 

The National League all-star 
roster includes Chad Hallett, 
Larry Taglieri, Tad Sheets and 
Dan Dever of Boston Gear; Billy 
Burkhead, Robby Fitzgerald and 
Steve Minichiello, Rotary; Shawn 
Mullen. Randy Rapoljie and Dave 



Tocchio, Elks; Rick Nabstedt, Jim 
Phelan and Austin O'Malley, 
Houghs Neck Legion; Mark 
Bilton, Amal Abouzeid and Scott 
Sacchetti, Colonial Federal, and 
Brett Heeney, Jack Kilrain and 
Dan Santry of Keohane's. Dan 
Duncan of Boston Gear is 
manager. 

Playing for the American stars 
will be Jay DeBartolo, Bobby 
Laracy, Chris Marshall and Kyle 



Robertson, Foley Chrysler- 
Plymouth; Steve Austin, Tommy 
Logan and Danny Raymondi, 
Sears; Dennis DeCoste, Tom 
Reilly and Chris Riccuitti, 
Kiwanis; Walter Downing, Steve 
Hensley and Chris Conway, 
Burgin Platner; Scott Hohman, 
John McKenna and Billy Roche, 
Remick's, and Joel Balducci, 
Dennis Doherty and Jamie 
McArdle, Bryan VFW. Bob Foley 
of Foley is manager. 



Positions Available In 
School Athletic Programs 



Parsons & Richardson 

INSURANCE AGENCY 
INC. 



'Be Sure Now - Not Sorry Later' 

Robert W. Richardson 

P Resident 3 1276 



Opposite Quincy 
Center MBTA 



CLASSES FOR MEN, WOMEN and CHILDREN 



Carl Leone, coordinator of 
athletics and transportation for the 
Quincy Public Schools, announces 
that there are several positions still 
unfilled for the fall season. 

The positions and their 
locations are: 

Assistant boys' soccer coach. 
North Quincy High School; head 
girls' swim coach, Quincy High; 
head boys' soccer coach, Quincy 

Hancock Bank 
Stretches Streak 

The Hancock Bank continues to 
roll along unbeaten in the South 
Shore Bankers Softball League 
and holds a three-game lead with a 
1 0-0 record. State Street Bank is in 
second place at 7-3. 

The rest of the standings: South 
Weymouth Savings, 7-4; Bay Bank 
Norfolk 4-5; Quincy Savings, 3-7; 
South Shore Bank, 3-7, and 
Quincy Co-operative, 1-9. 

Last week Hancock topped Bay 
Bank, 12-5; State Street walloped 
South Shore Bank, 17-9, and 
South Weymouth Savings blanked 
Quincy Savings, 7-0. 



High; assistant boys' soccer coach, 
Quincy High; assistant football 
coach (2), Broad Meadows; head 
volleyball coach. Central; head 
boys' soccer coach. Central; head 
girls' soccer coach. Central; 
assistant football coach. Point; 
head volleyball coach. Point; head 
boys' soccer coach, Sterling. 

If anyone is interested in filling 
any of the above positions, he/she 
may notify Leone's office or call 
him at 786-8782. 



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INSTALLATION 

• DUAL EXHAUSTS 

• PIPES 

• BRAKES 


SPRINGS 

FOR ALL MAKES 
OF... 


BODY RESTORATION 
AND PAINTING 


CARS • BUSES • TRUCKS 

• TRAILERS 

AUTO SPRINGS INSTALLED 

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WHEELS BALANCED 

Springs, Axles, Frames 

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HEAVY TRUCK SPECIALISTS — AUTO MACHINE SHOP 

Complete line of services. We have a full staff of professional and experienced 
automotive specialists. 

471-6950 

111 McGRATH HIGHWAY, QUINCY 

Hours: 8 to 5:30 Mon. thru Fri. 



J 



**# 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 1981 



Arts/Entertainment 



N.E. Lighthouses 

Program At 
Historical Society 



"Lighthouses of New England" 
will be the topic of a slide 
presentation Tuesday, July 2 1, at I 
p.m. at Adams Academy, 8 Adams 
Si. as part of the Quincy 
Historical Society's "Quincy 
Remembers" series. 

The free program will be 
presented by Russell C. Sanborn 
who has visited, researched and 
photographed almost all of New 
England's 145 lighthouses. 

Refreshments will be served. 
More information can be obtained 
by calling 773-1144. 

Upcoming programs will be: 

Tuesday, Aug. 4, 1 p.m. - "Old 
Ironsides," slides and commentary 
by Cdr. Tyrone G. Martin, 
Captain of the U.S.S. Constitution 
(1974-1978) and author of the 
narrative," A Most Fortunate 
Ship". 

Tuesday, Aug. 18, I p.m. - 
"Overcoming Poverty, The Early 
Boston Irish Experience," a slide 
lecture describing the misfortunes 



and successes of Boston's 
courageous 19th century Irish 
immigrants, by Dr. Dennis Ryan, 
teacher and author. 

Tuesday, Sept. I, I p.m. - 
"Ladies First," a live, one woman 
production by actress Robin lane. 
Five first ladies, from Rachel 
Jackson to Jacqueline Kennedy, 
each with a strong and unique 
personality, are portrayed with 
humor and pathos. 

Tuesday, Sept. 15, I p.m. - 
"Quincy Granite," the illustrated 
story of one of our city's greatest 
industries, by Gordon D. Carr, 
E.A. Erikson Monumental Works. 

Tuesday, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m. 
(note special time) - "Petticoats 
and Parasols," a fashion show of 
late 19th and early 20th century 
costumes presented with live music 
by volunteers on behalf of 
Goodwill Industries. 

The programs are funded, in 
part, by a grant from the Institute 
of Museum Services. 



HN Legion Flag 
Contest Winners Announced 



Student winners of the Houghs 
Neck Legion's annual flag essay 
contest have been announced by 



BRA-WEY >$ 
FLORIST H ft. 

94 Washington Si. 

Weymouth 

3370288 3370289 



Alice Scribner, junior vice 
commander and chairman of the 
contest. 

The winners are Mary McCole, 
1348 Quincy Shore Drive, at the 
Merrymount School, and Gayle 
Morrell, 64 Parkhurst St., at the 
Atherton Hough School. 

Prizes of $25 each were given to 
the winners and the traveling 
trophy went to the Atherton 
Hough School. 



JASON'S 



1514 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY 



SAVE ON RECORDS 

TAPES-LUGGAGE 

SHEET MUSIC 

LEATHER GOODS & MORE 





Dinner Specials from *3.50 

Daily 3:00-9:00 

Chinese Polynesian Food 
New Additional Luncheon 
Specials 11:30 to 3 P.M. 
Dinner Specials 3 P.M. to 9 P.M. 
Banquet Facilities 
Cocktail Lounge 





SEA BRIGHT, Quincy's own recording group, ready a number at Al's Dine and Dance. Left to right, Bob 
Hobbs, Phil Donovan, P.J. McCaul (partially hidden), Debbie Sturdevant, Dave Southerland, Mike Cotter. 

(Sal Hahamu Phut a) 



Local Group Encouraged 



Quincy's f Sea Bright' 
Record Off And Spinning 



By TOM HENSHAW 

Mike Cotter, a Houghs Neck 
boy, has written 200 unpublished 
songs in the past 12 years and he 
just got laid off as a teacher in the 
Randolph school system. 

Debbie Sturdevant also got 
"riffed" (for reduction in force or 
laid off) by the Braintree public 
schools. 

Bob Hobbs is best described as 
an itinerant shipwright, working 
the local boatyards. 

So they, along with P. J. 
McCaul, Dave Southerland and 
Phil Donovan, have just invested 
a borrowed $15,000 and nine 
months of their time in their first 
record album. 

The group is called "Sea 




Featuring 

the Finest In 

Sew England 

(looking 



LUNCHEON 

II A.M. to 4 P.M. 

DINNER 

4 P.M. to 10 P.M. 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

Bowling Banquets 

Retirement Parties Showers 

Weddings & Anniversaries 

Entertainment 

Nightly at the 

Fireside Lounge 

FOR RESERVATIONS 
Call 471 1623, 471 5540 




Bright" and the record, of the 
same name, came out June 4. In 
its first week on sale in local 
music shops it sold 400 copies. 

"We need 2,000 to make it, 
which doesn't seem to be a 
problem the way they are going," 
said Cotter, the spokesman for 
the group, which held a grand 
launching party for the record 
recently at the Quincy Yacht 
Club. 

The songs on the record were 
written by Cotter and include 
such soon-to-be local favorites as 
"The Nut Island Blues", a 
musical salute to the MDC's 
sewage treatment plant. 

There is also a number called 
"Al's Dine and Dance", which 
commemorates a night spot on 
Sea St. in Adams Shore, now 
known as Dayce's Place, where 
Sea Bright plays on occasion. 

All members of the group live 
within a mile of each other in 
Houghs Neck, except Donovan, 
who lives in Randolph and is the 
only fulltime musician in the 
group. 

Southerland is an electronics 



technician while McCaul works 
with electronic games. 

Donovan, an incredibly versa- 
tile musician, plays the acoustic 
and electric guitars, flute, 
clarinet, vibes, percussion, moog, 
and occasionally vocalizes. 

(A moog, for those of us who 
came in late, is an instrument that 
synthesizes music). 

The record was cut at Sea 
Bright's expense at Soundtrack 
Studios in Boston. The 14 songs 
were recorded over a period of 
nine months at a cost of $10,000. 

"We put a lot of care into it," 
said Cotter. "It reflects real well 
on Quincy. It has been getting a 
good reception from people in 
their teens to their seventies." 

The music is described as soft 
rock and "country-eastern". 

The next step now, says Cotter, 
is to get a recording company or a 
music publisher or a distributor 
interested in the record and in 
others that the group has in mind. 

Until then. Sea Bright will 
remain "the South Shore's 
premier independent recording 
band." 



South Shore Television 

SALES AND SERVICE 



nc/i 

Authorized 
Servicenter 



In or out of warranty 

Regardless 

where purchased 



Save with Carry in Service 

Servicp in All Leading 
Brands for Over 30 Years 

4791350 

Remo DeNicola Lie. No. 12 
12 Revere Road, Quincy 

(Off 1586 Hancock Street) 



♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

! 

1 



LAS VEGAS NIGHT 

Saturday, July 18, 1981 

7:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. 

at 
Knights of Pythias Hall 

1 1 Evans Drive (corner Central) 

Stoughton, Mass. 

Admission $2 

Cash Prizes Central Air Conditioned 

Cash door prizes hourly 
Free Refreshments Bar available 

Sponsored by Canton Lodge - proceeds to charity 



I 



: 



Thursday, July 16, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 19 



■ 



800 Brave 90 Degree Heat 
For Chamber Outing 



Realtors Outing, Banquet 
Set For Aug 3 In Hingham 



By TOM HENSHAW 

Some 800 members of the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce and guests defied 
sweltering 90-pIus degree heat to 
gambol and picnic at the 
Chamber's outing at Ridder Golf 
Club in Whitman. 

The Ridder Club, with its 
rolling green lawns and air- 
conditioned clubhouse, was a new 
location for the annual clambake 
after five years at the Halifax 
Country Club in Halifax. 

Part of the proceeds of the 1981 
outing was donated to the Boston 
Floating Hospital in memory of 
the late George C. Fay, who had 
been chairman of the clambake 
for some 20 years. 

The donation was presented to 
Leo Fay, the brother of George, 
by Chamber President Lindsay 
Tait, president of the Braintree 



Savings Bank. George Fay died 
earlier this year. 

For the second year in a row, 
Don Gardner of Duxbury and 
Procter and Gamble of Quincy, 
won the coveted Lou Cassani 
Trophy as medalist of the golf 
tournament. He shot a 68. 

Winners in other contests 
included: 

Tennis, Doubles, Round 1 - 
Won by Robert Austin, C. A. 
Powers and Sons, and John Swan, 
Federal Petroleum; Round 2 - 
Peter Pratt, E. C. Fowler 
Insurance, and David Powers, C. 
A. Powers and Soi.s. 

Volleyball - Won by a team 
composed of Nick Roundtree, 
Nancie Roundtree, Walt Seamon, 
Tom LaForte, Steve Rodriguez, 
John Condon, Bernie DesRosiers, 
Bob Haddad, Bobby Davidson. 

Egg Throw - Won by the team 
of Steve Needel and Paul 



* 



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Also Tasty Fried Food To Go 

BURKE'S SEAFOOD 

Quality Fresh Fish 



SPECIALS THIS WEEK 
Fresh Lobster Meat $10.95 lb. 
Fresh Native Crabmeat $4.50 Vi lb. 
Fresh Lobster Salad Roll $2.89 each 



HOMEMADE FISH & CLAM CHOWDERS 
Don't forget our Family Nite Special 

Every Tues. and Wed. Evening only$6.95 

HOURS: Tues.-Wed. 10-6, Thurs.-Fri. 10-7, Sat. 10-5 
61 BILLINGS ROAD, NORTH QUINCY 328-9765 
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Boston 



(One block from The Quincy Market)^ 



Featuring the finest 
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Sullivan. 

Football Throw - Won by Chip 
Colletta, Wollaston Credit Union. 

Basketball Free Throw - Won 
by Kevin Daley, Mass Business 
Equipment. 

Golf Putt - Won by Ray 
Paulson. 

Racquetball - Won by Bob 
Guarnieri, Colonial Federal. 

Horseshoes - Won by the team 
of Ray Skellett and Fred Hakla, 
both of Boston Gas. 

Cribbage - Won by the team of 
Paul Biller and Robert Wise. 

Bocce - Won by the team of Ray 
Skellett, Howard Hughes, Fred 
Hakla and Jack McCarthy, Boston 
Gas. 

Softball - Won by a team made 
up of Al Simmons, Mark Leavitt, 
Bert Gilbert, Steve Needel. Jack 
Walsh, Mike O'Hanley, Paul 
Osborne, Charlie Johnston, Tom 
Lynch, Steve Monaco. 

Obstacle Course (a new event) - 
Won by John Marino. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATRE 



The Quincy and South Shore 
Board of Realtors will hold its 
annual outing and Realtor of the 
Year banquet Monday, Aug. 3, 
from 10 a.m. to II p.m. at the 
South Shore Country Club in 
Hingham. 

The day will include chowder, 
hot dogs, beer and tonic from 12 



noon to 2 p.m.; a cocktail hour; 
dinner at 7:30 p.m. and dancing 
from 8 p.m. to 1 1 p.m. There will 
be swimming, golf and tennis all 
day. 

Registration deadline is 
Thursday, July 30, and all 
reservations must be paid in 
advance. 



Annmarie Smith I '-Mass Crad. 



Annmarie Smith, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Smith of 
170 Davis St., Wollaston, was 



recently graduated from U. Mass- 
Boston with a B.A. degree in 
sociology. 



14 Beale St. 



7734600 



Wed. &Thurs. July 15 & 16 

ONE OF THE YEAR'S BEST 

"Breaker Morant" <pg) 

Winner 10 Australian Awards 
Eve's 7:00 Only 

Starts Fri July 17 

EXPERIENCE THE FANTASTIC 

"Clash of the Titans" (PG) 

Mortals Clash With Gods 
Fri & Sat 7:00 & 9:15 

Sun-Thurs 7:00 Only 

Mon & Tues Dollar Night 



John Horrigan's School of Drumming 
Presents Its Second Annual 

Concert - Recital 

Sunday July 19, 1981 at 12:30 P.M. 

Atlantic Junior High School 
86 Mollis Avenue, No. Quincy, Mass. 

For information, 

Call John Horrigan, 

472-6672 

Admission $4.50 At Door 
Bands/Refreshments 




ailllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllE 

= A Tradition in North Quincy for 50 Years 




WalstyB I 
itataurant I 

9 Billings Road 
North Quincy 

328-5455 

Open 7 Days a Week E 

Featuring 

LUNCHEON SPECIALS I 
$2.25 to $4.25 

DAILY | 

DINNER SPECIALS I 



THURS. EVENING 

OUR FAMOUS 
N.E. BOILED DINNER j 

FRI. EVENING 
FISHERMAN'S PLATTER! 

Dinner Served 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. 
Sun. - Wed. 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

Gentlemens Bar Salad Bar 

member |dinner meals on, V 

(OJM) 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiuiiiiiiiiiiimiiiilrf 



BtrMIIIIiItU 



Antique Aitctttftt 

6:30 P.M. 
Wednesday July 22, 1981 Preview 5:00 P.M. 

120 Quarry St. SONS OF ITALY HALL Quincy Mass 

Located off Furnace Brook Parkway at Furnace Brook exit; 
From Quincy Center, take Granite St. to Quarry St. 

Partial Needham Estate: 

Furniture: In Oak: Chests, sideboard, commode, round table, machinest tool box, medicine chest, ladies desk, china 

cabinet, lion carved chair. 2 door bookcase, hat tree, file box, larkin desk. In walnut; Oval table, medicine chest, chair 

retangular table. Mahogany Vict, platform rocker, bookcase, desk combo, empire sewing table, spinet desk, side 

chairs, etc. Early banister back chair (ca. 16X0-1720). in the rough. Windsor stool, sig'nd J.C. Hubbard. Boston. 

Decorated pine chest & commode, mythical animal carved table, teak & onyx stand. Mali tilt top table, etc. 

Clocks: a line collection of Connecticut clocks. 20 in all. 0(i. Wheaton. successor to Eli Terri fie Sons.. E.N. Welch 

Schoolhousc rosewood veneer, clubtooth escapement. New Haven Beehive, Vienna Regulator. Seth Thomas carved 

oak shell clock. German wall w unusual pendulum. Kroeber movement. Sm. black Marble "Haskins' Bedford. Mass 

& others. 32" Aneroid barometer in oak 

Tools: 3 Brass bound levels, wood & brass brace bit. rules, wood planes etc. 

Lamps: Electric Brass student lamp, banquet, gooseneck, crysolene. Emeralite, ra\o. fingerlamp, R R lamp etc. 

Rugs: 2 sm. orientals. 

Brass and Copper: Towel bars, coffee pot. copper inkwell fillers, scales. Porthole, coflee urn, iron doorstop, 

matcholder. brass buddha. 

Glass & China: Several lots Dorchester pottery. Smith Bros. "Santa Maria" plate. Marblehead bowl, oriental 

vase. Cambridge "Nude". Ia//a. unsigned Steuben vase, cruet. Royal Doulton figure "Spring Morning", etc. 

Misc: 30" bsq. Head hands w crck doll. Doll Carriage. Baskets, Tootsie toy doll lurn. sail boat model, phono, etc. 



^****************¥¥¥ 



SALE PER ORDER AUCTIONEERS: Harry Thompson 
REFRESHMENTS Richard D. Pompeo 

AIR CONDITIONED! 



No 10% 
Surcharge 



479-0477 
773-3892 
TERMS: Cash or good check 
With local ID 



Pagr 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 1981 




Special Features 



Grubby 



By Warren Sattler 




Grandpa's Boy 



By Brad Anderson 



?\&$>T T/aAE Fotz 
EVERYTHING-, 




IT JUST SO HAPPENED 




Ifi/MAiA/E 

ITS P.6AMST 

THE LAW 

70 WALK 

THR0U6H 

Tut streets 
with Your 

shoelaces 
i/sriEPf 



The. 
XILLER , 
DOLPHIN? 




A 6LUTTENF0R 
FOOD. THE STOMACH OF 
QUE SPECIMEN CONTAINED H-SEALSf 



1GNACE 



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fetf**! 



RENOONED FVL/bH 
R/A/V/SZ SIGNED 7VE TREATY 
OF VERSAILLES IN I9IS. HE 
THEN PERSUADED PRESIDENT 
U/IL 90N TO INSERT A PARAGRAPH 
7t> GUARANTEE POLISH 
/NDERENDENCe f 



The T/Ni HUMMINGBIRD 
Caw cross the Gulf of Mexico 

/NA5OO-MlLEiV0KS70PFU6Hrf 





Unmix the letters in the boxes to form a 
word. Then circle A, B or C (or the cor- 
rect meaning (or definition). 
Score yourself as follows : 
4 Correct-Excellent 2 Correct-Fair 
3 Correct-Good 1-0 Correct-Poor 



By D. J. Coates 




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STARSCOPi* V* 
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* — 

WEEK OF: JULY 16 

AQUARIUS - January 21 -February 19 

A troublesome and perhaps costly obligation will be shared — to your 
immense relief. Somewhat accident prone, you should take extra- 
special care when handling mechanical devices. 

PISCES - February 20-March 20 

Financial gains scattered through the week, but play the miser. Social 
postponements come in a series. Good week for job hurjting — 
especially if work involves sales. 

ARIES - March 21 -April 20 

Friends are supportive now and you can ask them for special favors. 
Dealings with teachers become complicated. Focus attention on 
fitness and health programs. 

TAURUS - April 21-May 22 

Volunteer assignments can wear you down, and you may have to 
leam to say "no." Faraway communications and explorations to local 
hideaways are among highlights of a busy week. 

GEMINI - May 23 June 21 

Week offers good opportunity for success in professional or social 
organizations. Financial advisor may have some strong words for you; 
listen attentively — and ask questions. 

CANCER - June 22 July 22 

Disputes with partner can be resolved if you emphasize humor. Shop- 
ping for antiques and nostalgia items is favored Long-distance com- 
munications arrives after a delay. 

LEO - July 23- August 22 

Good week for experimenting in several fields — but don't be reckless 
in areas of romance or investment. Emphasis is on the past, with the 
possible return of a former admirer. 

VIRGO - August 23-September 22 

Your "convincing" arguments fail to convince, so quit while you're 
ahead. Good week for sorting out money matters, for home Im- 
provements, and for exploring all new territories 

LIBRA - September 23-October 22 

Selectivity is week's keyword. There are lots of choices on the table, 
and you can't have them all. Thrift pays off by the weekend. Loved 
one is in a noncommital mood. 

SCORPIO - October 23- November 21 

Reluctant friends are suddenly eager to please, and there could be 
some strings attached. Optimistic outlook helps you over a domestic 
obstacle course and on to brighter horizons. 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22-December 22 

Do yourself a favor and aim to meet the increased demands of a 
higher-up. Community battle still rages, but domestic tensions ease 
quickly. Mini-windfall may strike by Tuesday. 

CAPRICORN - December 23 January 20 

It's worth the effort to get acquainted with new people. If traveling, 
your plans change with the winds. Money matters improve, but a 
realistic attitude is a must. 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

Generous — sometimes to a fault, and sensitive — also to a fault. But 
warm — and there are never any faults here. Year ahead accents 
academic expansion, especially in the arts and any areas involving 
history. 

BORN THIS WEEK 

July 16th, actress Ginger Rogers; 17th, actress Diahann Carroll; 
18th, actor Red Skelton; 19th, singer Vicki Carr; 20th, actress Diana 
Rigg; 21st, violinist Isaac Stem; 22nd, actor Orson Bean. 



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iiiursdav. July 16, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 21 





DRIZZLY WEATHER didn't dampen the spirits of parishioners from St. John's Church 
at the annual July 4 celebration. Enjoying their meals under cover of umbrellas were, 
from left, Clement O'Brien, Jr., Barbara O'Brien, Clement O'Brien Sr., Quincy Housing 
Authority director; and Kay O'Brien. 

Quincy Nursing Home Residents 
►onsor Indian Girl 



ENTHUSIASTIC YOUNGSTERS lined up for the Bunny Hop at St. John's July 4 
celebration. Music was provided by Omega Band. 

(Quincy Sun Photos by Dave Gillooly) 



Sp< 



'Miraculous Madonna 9 
At St. Joseph's Church 



Residents of Quincy Nursing 
Home, 11 McGrath Highway, 
recently decided to reach out to a 
child in need - Wyslie Ann Coon, 
a 10 year old Seminole Indian girl. 

Through the Christian 
Children's Fund, Richmond, Va., 
residents will be providing some 
monthly financial support for 
Wyslie who lives with her grand- 
parents in central Oklahoma*. 

Wyslie, who has one brother, 
was deserted by her parents. 
Although she receives welfare 
benefits, the income is not 



sufficient to provide all of her 
basic necessities. 

The nursing home's contribu- 
tions will come out of the 
Resident Council Fund which 
includes proceeds from bazaars 
and bake sales coordinated 
through the home's activity 
program. 

The Christian Children's Fund 
uses the sponsorship to help 
provide child care as well as to 
develop a person-to-person 
relationship between the child 
and sponsor. 



Kathleen Jones Awarded 
Cardinal Spellman Scholarship 

Kathleen M. Jones, 13, of 
Hanover, granddaughter of Mrs. 
Margaret E. (McDonald) 
Sweeney of Quincy, was recently 
awarded a scholarship to Cardinal 
Spellman High School, Brockton. 

The scholarship was presented 
by the Knights of Columbus 
Council. 

Miss Jones, daughter of 
Nathan and Margaret M. 
(Sweeney) Jones, was recently 
graduated from St. Bridget's 
School, Abington, with the 
highest scholastic rating in her 
class. 

Born in Quincy, she is also the 
granddaughter of the late Mr. M. 




KATHLEEN M.JONES 

Joseph Sweeney. 



New Director 
At Family Planning Services 



Nursing home residents are 
looking forward to corresponding 
with Wyslie and learning about 
her interests as well as about the 
Seminole Indian culture. They 
will also share news with her 
about themselves. 

The residents feel so strongly 
about the project that they 
encourage other nursing home 
residents to sponsor a child. 

Information is available from 
the Resident Council of Quincy 
Nursing Home or through the 
sponsorship organization. 

2 Residents 
Lav Ministers 

Two persons from Quincy were 
among 23 recent graduates of the 
Lay Ministry Training Institute 
who were commissioned at St. 
Gabriel's Church, Brighton. 

Sarah Keane and Dr. William 
Stempsey will serve their local 
church communities as retreat 
directors, youth ministers, 
service to the poor, campus 
ministry and other projects. 

Vo-Tech Nursing 
Commencement July 21 

Commencement exercises for 
Quincy Vocational Technical 
School's Practical Nursing 
Program will be held Tuesday, 
July 21, at 7:30 p.m. at the North 
Quincy High School auditorium. 



A documentary film on The 
Miraculous Madonna of the Roses 
at San Damiano, Italy, will be 
shown Wednesday, July 22, at 7:30 
p.m. in the school hall of St. 
Joseph's Church in Quincy Point. 

The film will be shown by Mrs. 
Claire LeBlanc, who started a San 
Damiano Center in her home in 
Natick 10 years ago to promote 
Papal approval of the apparitions 



of Mary at San Damiano. 

Mrs. LeBlanc, who also 
publishes a newsletter and has 
written many pamphlets on San 
Damiano, will hold a question and 
answer period after the film is 
shown. 

Admission is free and there will 
be a recitation of the Rosary and 
refreshments. 

Paul Bassett and Raimondo A. 
DiBona are chairman of the event. 



Goodwill Industries Seek 
Donated Housewares 



Morgan Memorial Goodwill 
Industries urges the public to 
donate housewares to its attended 
donation trailer at 130 Granite 
St., next to Star Market. 

"We are in dire need of house- 
hold goods," said James 
Delaney, Morgan Memorial's 
Director of Industrial Operations. 
"The demand (in the stores) is 
there." Donations of housewares 
have dropped considerably, and 
the lag must be made up 
immediately, he said. 

Customer's demand has also 
risen for clothing, and more 
donations are needed to assure a 
full line of fashions for the fall 
season. 

The more household goods and 
clothing are donated to Goodwill, 
the more handicapped people 
Goodwill can employ and rehabili- 
tate, Delaney explained. 



Many handicapped workers are 
directly involved in the sorting, 
cleaning, sizing, pricing and 
shipping of these products to 
Goodwill's Morgie's stores, he 
said. 

Do not leave donations when 
the attendant is off duty. 



Ursula Garfield-Copello has 
been appointed director of Family 
Planning Services of the South 
Shore, succeeding Laura Liscio, 
who resigned. 

Garfield-Copello has been 
acting director since April. 

"My goal is to revitalize 
services in the Quincy area," she 
said. "I want to redesign every 
aspect of the program to make it 
more accessible to a broader 
range of people." 

Prior to coming to Quincy, 
Garfield-Copello was assistant 
director of Planned Parenthood in 



Buffalo, N.Y. She spent six years 
with Brockton Family Planning as 
counsellor and clinic director. 



Wollaston Church 
of the JNazarene 




37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaaton 

— Services — 

Sunday- 11:00 a.m. ft 6:00 p.m. 

Wednesday- 7:00 p.m. 

"Your Community Church" 



Attorney Services 

ALAN H. SEGAL 

328-6545 
848-6272 



175 Quincy Shore 
Drive, Quincy 
400 Franklin St.. 
Brainlree 



General Practice 

Criminal & Family Law 

Personal Injury Claims 

Real Estate 

Wills & Trusts 

NO CHARGE FOR FIRST 
OFFICE VISIT 



JOHN E. FRANKLIN, M.D. 

Announces the Opening of his Office 

FOR THE PRACTICE OF 

INTERNAL MEDICINE 



Office Hours 

by 

Appointment 



59 COD D IK" f ON ST. 
QUIIiwY 

328-7001 



Hedge Pruning 
Yard Renovation 
Poolside Landscaping 




Wood Fences & Repairs 
Decks & Retaining Walls 
Shrub Planting & Pruning 



Call Now For Free Estimate 

471-8824 WHITTEMORE BROS. 4726904 

Graduate of Stockbridge School of Agriculture 




Feeling Guilty? Many 
people do. Reasons range 
from broken homes to 
unbroken habits. What- 
ever the cause, it's an 
ugly feeling. Guilt is 
both the fact of having 
done wrong and the feel- 
ing of blame for doing 
it. It's worst when the 
way you live leaves you 
empty, frustrated, and 
filled with regret. But 
there is a solution. Face 
the fact and remember 
God forgives. Then let 
Him! Before this ad was 
placed we started pray- 
ing for you because we 
care. Give us a chance to 
share. 



^Uiih&Kr^ 



Glad Tidings Church 

158 Washington Street 

QUINCY 

...A church where something 
"WONDERFUL" happens 
every Sunday! 

The Church... 

...in Study 9:30 a.m. 

...in Worship 10:45 p.m. 

...in Celebration 6:30 p.m. 
.Comc.be a part.. .help us 
Grow! 



Paje 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 1981 



Heale &t. 
3\b\\ itarket 

35 Years at 35 Beale St. 

Fresh Seafoods Daily 

Cooked Seafoods 
Eat in-or Take out 



DeCristofaro Reaffirms 
Opposition To 2 A.M. Closings 



Fresh Steamers $1.10 lb. 

Fresh Lobster Meat $14.95 lb. 

Fresh Crabmeot Salad Roll $ 2.1 5 each 

Stuffed Flounder with Newburg Sauce 
or 
Baked Haddock with Lemon Butter. Each served with 
French Fries or Potato Salad. $1.95 



Wollaston 479-0039 




LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 139 
ORDERED: 



June 1, 1981 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1971, as amended, be 
further amended as follows: 

INSERT THE FOLLOWING: Chapter 10a - Junk & Secondhand Dealers - 

PURCHASE OR SALE OF GOLD, SILVER AND PLATINUM 

Whoever is in the business of purchasing and selling gold, silver or platinum 
and keeps or stores same in any building or place within the limits of the city 
shall be required to be licensed in accordance with the provisions of chapter 
ten. The keeper of such a shop shall enter in a book kept for that purpose at 
the time of every purchase, a description ol the item, the quantity purchased, 
the purchase price, the name, age and address of the seller, the day and hour 
when such purchase was made, and, at the time of making the purchase, shall 
attach a number to each article bought, and shall make entry of such number 
in the book. No such purchase shall be made of any such articles from a minor 
or from any person the keeper of such shop has reason to believe is a minor. 
Any person who sells gold, silver or platinum shall be required to show to the 
keeper of the shop prior to said sale, identification which includes a 
photograph of said seller. 

No article purchased or received which is subject to this chapter shall be sold 
or altered in appearance, form or substance until a period of at least fourteen 
days from the date of its purchase or receipt has elapsed. 

Said book shall at all times be open for the inspection of the mayor, chief of 
police, any member of the police force, any member of the board of license 
commissioners and by any person authorized by the board of license 
commissioners. 

Every such shopkeeper shall make out and deliver to the chief of police every 
day, Sunday and holidays excepted, before the hour of 10:00 A.M., a legible 
and correct list containing an accurate description of all articles purchased 
which are subject to this chapter and all other information required as listed 
above, including the respective numbers of such articles. 

This chapter shall not apply to numismatic matter in accordance with section 
55 of chapter 140 of the General Laws nor to wholesalers or wholesale 
transactions between licensed retailers under this chapter. Whoever violates 
any rule, regulation or restriction contained in his license shall be subject to 
the penalty provided in section 10 of chapter 1 of the Quincy City 
Ordinances. 

Passed to be Ordained 

June 30, 1981 

Attest: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved July 3, 1981 

Arthur Tobin 

Mayor 

A True Copy Attest: Josephine L. Carnali, Acting Assl. City Clerk 

7/16/81 



Ted DeCristofaro, candidate for 
Ward 2 Councillor, has re- 
affirmed his opposition to 
extending the hours of operation 
of Washington St., drinking 
establishments from 1 a.m. to 2 
a.m. 

DeCristofaro noted that as 
chairman of the Ward 2 Civic 
Association, he spearheaded the 
drive, along with local elected 
officials, to close down several of 
the more troublesome establish- 
ments in that area. Those that 
were not closed had their hours 
rolled back to 1 a.m. 

"The people of Quincy Point 
fought long and hard to take back 
control of their neighborhood, by 
forcing out many of the unwanted 
elements and making sure those 
establishments which remain in 
operation do little to disrupt the 
character of the surrounding 
area," he said. 

"Despite the attempts of 
certain proprietors to re-extend 

LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81F1864E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES BROWNLIE late of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that SOUTH SHORE BANK of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executor named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/19/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Ninth day of July in the 
Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/9-16-23/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Trial Court of 

Massachusetts 

East Norfolk Division 

Civil Docket Nr 40812 

At the District Court of East 
Norfolk, holden at Quincy, within 
the County of Norfolk for civil 
business, on the eighth day of July, 
A.D., 1981. 

FREDERICK W. GILMORE, 
Plaintiff vs. JESSE ROSE, 
Defendant. 

This is an action of a Petition to 
Enforce Lien and For Storage and 
Cost of Motor Vehicle against the 
defendant Jesse Rose, as set forth in 
the Plaintiffs Complaint dated Julv 
6, 1981. 

And it appearing to the Court by 
the suggestion of the Plaintiff and on 
inspection of the officer's return on 
the plaintiff's summons, that no 
personal service of said complaint has 
been made upon the defendant Jesse 
Rose. 

IT IS ORDERED BY THE 
COURT, here, that the Plaintiff give 
notice to the defendant JESSE 
ROSE, of the pendency of this 
action, and to appear before the 
Court, on the thirty-first day of 
August, 1981, to answer to the same, 
by causing an attested copy of this 
order to be published in the Quincy 
Sun, a newspaper published in 
Quincy, Massachusetts, once a week, 
three weeks successively: and that 
this action be continued to the 
thirty-first day of August, 1981, or 
until notice shall be given to the 
Defendant Jesse Rose agreeably to 
this order. 

JAMES J. FOLEY, JR. CLERK 
A True Copy Attest. 

John Dalton 
Assistant Clerk-Magistrate 
7/16-23-30/81 



their hours to the 2 a.m. limit, as 
chairman of the local civic 
association I have lobbied 
successfully before the Licensing 
Board on several occasions to 
maintain the 1 a.m. closing. 

"It is my feeling that any 
increase in the hours of operation, 
although admittedly beneficial to 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 77M09O6-D2 

SHERRI A. CONNELLY Plaintiff 
vs. PAUL W. CONNELLY 
Defendant. Summons by Publication. 

To the above-named Defendant: 

A complaint has been presented to 
this Court by your spouse, Sherri A. 
Connelly, seeking to dissolve the 
bonds of matrimony, for alimony 
and for custody of and allowance for 
minor children. 

You are required to serve upon 
Thomas M. Barron, plaintiffs! 
attorney, whose address is 1372 
Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
your answer on or before August 5, 
1981. If you fail to do so, the Court 
will proceed to the hearing and 
adjudication of this action. You arc 
also required to file a copy of your 
answer in the office of the Register 
of this Court at Dedham. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esq., First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham June 19, 1981. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81FJ721E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOHN S. MALMGREN late 
of Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will and codicil of said 
deceased praying that VERA E. 
MALMGREN of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
Executrix named in the will without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/5/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Eighteenth day of June 
in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty -one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 811 18161-1 

Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CALOGERO GAZIANO 
also known as CHARLES GAZIANO 
late of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that ANTHONY M. GAZIANO of 
Mcdford in the County of Middlesex 
be appointed Executor named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/12/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
D' dham, the twenty-ninth day of 
June in the Year of our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty -one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/9-16-23/81 



the owners of the drinking 
establishments, would be too 
much at the expense of the 
adjacent neighborhoods. If we are 
to attract other businesses like 
John Hancock, we must continue 
to take steps which will improve 
the overall safety and desirability 
of the area." 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 84F1783E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GEORGE D. DALTON late 
of Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that MARY E. DALTON of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executrix named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you, desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/12/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-fifth day of 
June in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 80F0636E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOSEPH W. SMITH, late of 
Quincy, in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required, 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that JOHN N. KALLIS of Canton in 
the County of Norfolk be appointed 
Executor named in the will without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/26/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Seventh day of July in 
the Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/16-23-30/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81 IT 664 El 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GEORGE D. DAVIDSON 
late of Quincy, in the County of 
Norfolk. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that ELLA R. DAVIDSON of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executrix named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 7/29/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Fifteenth day of June 
in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/2-9-16/81 



Thursday, July 16. 1981 Quincy Sun Page 23 



!« CLASSIFIEDliDS! 



FOR SALE 



HELP WANTED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



Air Conditioners 
For Sale 

6000 BTU Wcstinghouse air 
conditioner, year 1975, only $129. 
5100 BTU Norge 1970 air 
conditioner $119. Both in excellent 
condition. Call 471-5153 after 8 
p.m. 

7 16 

75 Suzuki GT550 

Black, Excellent Running 
Condition. $1,000. 
479-5211 after 6:00. 

7 2.1 

Waterbeds 

New Queen or King Size Waterbed, 
never opened, 10 year waranty, 
walnut stained pine frame, 
headboard, deck, pedestal, 
mattress, liner, heater. Originally 
$330.00, now $199.00. 828-1662, 
Canton. 
8,20 

Dutchmaid 

Quality clothing for the entire 
family. 10% off all underwear 
orders. For the month of July only. 
Party plan or individual orders. 
Call Clemie Brill 479-6538. 

• 7 30 



PERSONALS 



IHANKSG1VING Novena to St. 

Jude: () Holy St. Judc. Apostle & 

Martyr, great in virtue and rich in 

miracles, near kinsman of Jesus 

.Christ, laithlul intercessor of all 

who invoke your special patronage 

in time of need, to you I have 

recourse from the depths of m\ 

heart and humbly beg to whom 

(iod has given \uch great power, to 

come to m\ assistance, help me in 

m\ present and urgent petition. In 

return. I promise to make your 

name known and cause you to be 

invoked Sa\ 3 Our Fathers. 3 Hail 

Marvs and Glorias. Publication 

must be promised. St Jude pray for 

us and all who invoke your aid. 

Amen. I his Novena has never been 

known to fail. I have had my 

request gr.mted. (This Novena to be 

said on 9 consecutive davs.) 

J.M. 

7 |« 

"A MESSAGE 
For Jehovah's Witnesses" 

Are you a Jehovah's Witness with 
questions? We may have the 
answers for you. Call 843-1836. 
New message weekly. 

7 16 

WANTED 



Air Conditioners 
Wanted 

Will pay $10 for your air 
conditioners, I960 and up. Call 
471-5153 after 8 p.m. 

7 16 

American Host 
Families Wanted 

American families wanted, to room 

and board select international 

students. Screening and 

supervision guaranteed. Min. 

Length of stay 4 mos. Please reply: 

TOM CUNNIFF 

S.P.S. Language Center 

883 Boylston St. 

Boston, MA 02116(262-0383) 

7 30 



Nancy's Nook 
537 Sea Street 

(2 minutes from Police Station) 
We are interested in selling the 
following on consignment. 
Infants, children's, teens and 
women's clothing in excellent 
condition. 

Also baby furniture and Arts & 
Crafts. Turn your articles into 
cash by bringing them in for 
consignment. 

Closed for vacation July 18th 
thru July 29th. Accepting fall 
consignments July 7th. 



Part Time 

Earn $5-10 hourly servicing our 
customers from home on your 
telephone. 924-7450. 

7 ; 30 

FOR RENT 

Cottages For 
Rent 

Scusset Beach area. 
Sagamore. Housekeeping 
cottages. Studio and 3- 
room available. Weekly 
rentals $165 to $200. 
Private beach. Tennis 
available. Call 328-1300, 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

if. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Miracle Of The Wood 

DMSO 
(organic) 

Distributed by St. Marks Inc. 464 
Granite Ave., Milton, Mass. 617- 
698-0223. 

7 30 

INSTRUCTION 

PRIVATE 
KARATE LESSONS 

At your home or office. Men or 
Women. Mornings or Afternoons. 
Personal instruction by Victor 
Moulton of The Moulton Academy 
of Karate. For information call 
337-9228. 

7 16 

Guitar Lessons 

By professional guitarist and 
teacher. All styles, all ages. 773- 
3588. 

7 30 



JAY'S 

TREE REMOVAL 

DONE BY TRAINED 
EXPERIENCED PERSONNEL 
Free Estimates 

LOW Futly lnsured 

low' 

RATES 

CALL AFTER 4P 

843-6115 




Wollaston Fuel & Burner Service 



WE SERVICE 

oil burners 
oil heating systems 
gas heating systems 
all motor & controls 
all hot water problems 
air conditioning 

773-3443 

42 St. Ann's Road 

AN AUTHORIZED 



WE INSTALL 



oil burners 

oil fired boilers 

gas fired boilers 

enertrol-computor 

energy savings - vent damper 

oil burners cleaned 
President Jerry LaFlamme 
Former Serviceman of 
General Automatic Heating 



ENE RTROL DEALER 

All Work Guaranteed 9 17 



BOB'S ODD JOBS 

Rubbish Removal 

Hauling i Moving 

Landscaping 

Interior/Exterior Painting 

General Home Maintenance 

A Repair* 

Many other services 

Free Estimates Very Reasonable 

472-0868 Nights ft Weekends 



Music Lessons 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 

BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER 

27 Beale St.. Wollaston 

Call 773-5325 

SERVICES OFFERED 

Larry's 
Home Repair 

Interior - exterior painting, scroll 
ceilings, gutters, roof repairs, and 
property maintenance. 328-8735, 
659-7471. 

Rainbow Painters 

Interior Exterior 

Painting Free Est. 

Old Fashioned Quality 

328-7266 328-6323 

7/23 



Housepainting 

Two experienced college students 

looking for summer work painting 

houses, interior and exterior. 

Quality work at very reasonable 

rates. 

For free estimate, please call Matt. 

773-6833. eves. 7-16 

John J. Donovan 

Plumbing, Heating & 

Gas Fitting 

Specializing 
in Bathroom Remolding, gas & oil 
heating systems. Boiler & Hot 
water heater. Replacements. 
Emergency Repairs. Master Lie. tt 
8617. 328-5675. 7 30 

—^— ^ i ■ i.i s.j — M— m 

Atlas Construction and 
Home Repair 

Experienced — painting, roofs, 
gutters, insulation, carpentry, 
drywell. Quality work at reasonable 
prices. Call John, 471-9423. 

7 16 

CHARTER 

24' Sailboat - Room of 28' Below. 
Sleeps 5. Well equipped for 
cruising. Weekly $375 - Daily & 
Weekend Rates Avail. 
328-6265 

7 16 



Atlantic 

CARPf T S UPHOLSTERY CLEANING SPECIALISTS 




CARPETS and UPHOLSTERY 
CLEANED 

IN YOUR HOUBOFFICE 



• VELVETS. TAPE STHIES 

• HAITIANS. MEACULONS 

• ALL OTM A FABRICS 



• OAIENTALI 

• WALL to WALL CARPETS 

• PICA UP • DELIVER* 



WATER DAMAGE 

FREE ESTIMATES 

471-3142 



Walter j Mclean 



GLASS WORK 

Table tops - plexiglas tinted & clear. 
Mirrors installed clear and 
goldvein. Screens, storm windows 
& sashes repaired. 7 days. Call 328- 
7 1 32 or 426-7989. Gene. 

7/23 



Your South Shore 

Headquarters 

For 

Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE & APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St., So Quincy 

472-1710 t.F. 




Wallpapering 

Experienced, neat, clean and 
courteous service. Call 328-6277. 

7 16 



HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a basic 
Homeowner's policy for $30,000 
and are paying more than $148. 00 a 
year. Call 479-4242 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency., T.F. 



Hall For Hire 

Weddings, showers, meetings, 
banquets. Elks Home. 1220 
Hancock St., Quincy. 

472-2223 t.f. 



Reliable Floor Service 

Hardwood floor sanding. 
Specialists since 1962. Poly- 
Urethane. Free Est. 335-5509. 8 13 



MOORE'S PAINTING 

INTERIOR -EXTERIOR 

FREE ESTIMATES 

High Quality - Low Cost 

College Student y«wi of experience 

Call Rory - 925-2419 after 5 p.m. 



Keys Made 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

86 Washington St., Quincy 
479-5454 



T.F 



A&T VACUUM 

Repair Specialists On All Makes 

• FREE Pickup, 
Delivdfry, Estimates 

• Belts, Bags, Hoses all vacs 

• New, used, Rebuilt vacs 

• $9.95 special 
(General overhaul) 
only on carry in 
service with Ad 

• Electrolux Bags 

(14 Pkg$4.29- 5 Pkg $1.59) 
25 Beale St. Wollaston - 479-5066 
357A Wash. St. Braintree- 848-S476 

T.F. 




Hall For Rent 

North Quincy K of C. Building, 5 
Mollis Ave. For information please 

ca " 328-0087 



T.F. 



"Tunerville Trolley" 

(ONE-MAN BAND) 

Yesteryear's answer for music and 
entertainment and your extra- 
special occasions. Call 773-3588. 

7/23 



Eager Beaver 

Tree Service 

Experience At 

Low Rates 

Pruning - Cutting- Removal. Lots 
cleared. Free estimates. Serving 
South Shore area. Call Cliff at 767- 
0359. 7 , 6 



Insulate Yourself 

We have a trailer of Cellulose Class 
I available. Rent blower or pour in 
place. THE DR Insulation Co., 600 
Southern Artery, Quincy, next to 
Duane's. 471-5777 

9/30 



INDEX FOR 
CLASSIFIED 

CHECK ONE 

□ Services 
D For Sale 
D Autos 
D Boats 

□ For Rent 

D Help Wanted 
D Pets, Livestock 
D Lost and Found 
D Real Estate for Sale 
D Real Estate Wanted 
D Miscellaneous 
D Work Wanted 
D Antiques 

□ Coins and Stamps 
D Rest Homes 

D Instruction 




MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St.. Quincy 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Cash must accompany order 



E nclosed is 



for the following ad to run times 



COPY: 



$3.20 for one week, up to 20 words, 5* each additional word 
$3.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions 

of the same ad ... 54 each additonal word. 
$2.80 per week up to 20 words, for ten or more insertions 

of the same ad. 
No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of cancellation 

Deadline: Tuesday, noon 

Please include your phone number in ad. 



Single Rate: 
Contract Rates: 



I 
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Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 1981 

Rent Board Meets 



The Rent Grievance Board was 
scheduled to meet Wednesday, 
July 15, at 7 p.m. in the City Hall 



Conference Room to hear at least 
two cases of rent increases. 



'Conflict' Seen In School Jobs 



Hutches 



If ordered by July 31st. 

Choose from seven of our 

Hottest Selling " OAK or 

PINE Hutches 

Offer expires July 31st 
Professional Finishing Available 



Hours: M - T - Wed. - Sat. 
Thurs. & Fri. - 9-9 




(Cont'd from Pa/iv I) 

year he was and I did. 
"But if there is a conflict 



of 



interest, he will be withdrawn." 

Tobin, who is chairman of the 
School Committee but has not 



337-0405 



ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 

COPIERS? 

Call us for a 

FREE 
DEMONSTRATION 

OF THE SCM C o 2 (|er 

QUINCY 

Typewriter Service 

5 Maple St., Quincy Sq. 472-3656 




"We service what we sell" 






r 



^ 




lNV ****»*****WiK»**&»>^ 



bank to meet 
the challenges 

of the 80*5. 



Even though the economy during 1980 was volatile and un- 
predictable, the South Boston Savings Bank, Massachusetts' 
highest earning savings bank, continued to grow. To see our 
strength, just look at our financial summary. 



FINANCIAL SUMMARY 




October 31 (millions) 






1980 


1979 


1978 


1977 


1976 


% change 
1976-1980 


Assets 


$459.2 


$436.4 


$399.0 


$365.2 


$325.6 


+41.0% 


Deposits 


$421.3 


$409.8 


$373.4 


$325.2 


$295.3 


+ 42.7% 


Mortgages and 
Mortgage-backed 
Securities S329.7 


$315.3 


$262.7 


$245.6 


$199.9 


+ 64.9% 


Other 
Investments 


$123.1 


$1203 


$123.7 


$1129 


$118.3 


+ 4.1% 


Capital 
Accounts 


$242 


$23.7 


$21.6 


S20.7 


$17.7 


+ 36.7% 


Operating 
Expenses 


$4.3 


$46 


$3.5 


$3.0 


S2.8 


r53.6% 


Net Income" 


$5 7 


$6.0 


$5.7 


$4.5 


$3.4 


-67.6% 


'Before Taxes 













u_ 



In 1980, interest paid depositors rose to a new high of 
$34.5 million. Assets increased 5.2% to $459 million. 
And deposits were up to 2.8% to $421.3 million. South 
Boston Savings Bank's growth continues, thanks to our 
depositors and their expanding needs. 
Assets comprised residential and commercial mortgage 
loans in Boston, the surrounding area, and across the 
country. Plus government, municipal and corporate 
securities and money market instruments. 
These assets give the South Boston Savings Bank the 
strength to meet the ongoing challenges of the 1980's. 
The record of growth and reliability South Boston Sav- 
ings Bank started in 1863 continues with our commit- 
ment to improve service to the public in the years ahead. 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

•ALWAYS THE LEADER'' 



Mam Office: 460 West Broadway 

South Boston, Tel. 268-2500 
NEPONSET CIRCLE • QUINCY 



attended many meetings recently, 
for legal reasons, said he was 
unaware of the program until a 
warrant for payment came to the 
auditor Monday. 

Others listed on the warrant for 
payment were: _, 

James Adams, James Austin, 
Robert Elder, Roberta Hennessey, 
Lawrence Kelley, Robert Kelley, 
Thomas Ryan, Raymond Tocchio, 
Tracy Kearns, Michelle 
McCarthy, Ann McElaney and 
Denise McCall. 

Tobin emphasized that there is 
no indication or accusation of 
wrong-doing against any of the 16 
young people. 

"1 don't know who the people 
are on that list," he said. "I don't 
have their addresses nor do I know 
if they are related to anyone in the 
city." 

He said John Toland, Suzanne 
Picard, and Patricia and John 
Sullivan were identified to him by 
school personnel as relatives of the 
three School Committeemembers. 
"The ball is in the School 
Committee's court now if they 
want to keep the program going, " 
said the Mayor. Dr. Creedon said 
the matter probably would come 
up at Wednesday night's meeting. 
Solicitor Fleming said the pay 
warrant for the 16 young workers 
probably would not be held up any 
longer than a day or two. 

"They earned the money," he 
said "They ought to get it." 

Dr. Creedon said the vote to hire 
the 16 youngsters was taken by the 
School Committee July 8. 

"It is standard practice," he said. 
"The list was presented to the 
committee and a vote was taken on 
the program. It was a voice vote, 
like all votes to hire. 

"Ever since I have been around 
the Quincy school system there 
have been summer work 
programs. They have been 
curtailed over the years. It wasn't 
unusual to have 30 or 40 kids on it 
in the past. 

"We don't have big advertising 
campaigns for it because there are 
not enough jobs. Kids hear of it by 
word of mouth and apply or 
sometimes the School Committee 
makes recommendations." 

He said he did not think thai 
there had been more than 16 
applicants for the program this 
summer. 

Mayor Tobin said he did not 
attend the July 8 School 
Committee meeting or any other 
recent meeting because he might 
jeopardize the city's case in its legal 
wrangling with the Committee. 

With the School Committee 
suing the city over non-funding of 
teachers' raises, Tobin is in the 
unique position of being mayor of 
the city on one side and chairman 
of the School Committee on the 
other. 

"They were calling for votes just 
to get me on the record and use it 
against me," he said. "I did not 
want to get into a dispute so I have 
absented myself from the 
meetings." 

Tobin said the warrant for 
payment for summer work was 
sent through the city mail from 
Asst. Supt. John A. Osterman to 
acting City Auditor William 
Grindlay. 

"When you send things through 
the mail, people see them," he said. 
"I got some inquiries about the list 
and I asked Mr. Grindlay. I 
understand someone questioned 
Dr. Creedon about it, too. 

The School Committee will 
have to make a determination if 
they are going to have a summer 
program. m 

"I can't speak for the others but I 
find it strange to lay off 500 people 
and close schools and then 
authorize the superintendent of 
schools to put children on a 
summer program. 

"I'm not criticizing these people. 
It was brought to my attention and 
I am doing this. I think they used 
very poor judgement." 



SUPPLEMENT TO 



QUINCYSUN 



PATRIOT LEDGER 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 1981 



DOWNTOWN QUINCY 




wsm 




Good Sounds At Great Savings! 



During Jason's Sidewalk Sale 



^g«^ 



asss 



J*«* 



f> 









JflffiSL 



ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK RECORDING 




INCLUDES 

THE FIRST TIME IT HAPPENS 

STEPPIN' OUT WITH A STAR 

HAPPINESS HOTEL 



"j^ 



GEORGE @ 
HARRISON 

Somewhere In England 

Include. All ThoM Yean Ago 

Tr.rJroo.Ufc Ittclf 



gg Your 

eoch A29 

IP v 



YOKO ONO 
Season Of Glass 




Tapes 







THERE GOES THE 
NEIGHBORHOOD 



RECORDS 




including: 

THINGS/RIVERS (OF THE HIDDEN FUNK) 

A LIFE OF ILLUSION 




4 Big Reasons To Get To 
Jason's During The Sidewalk Bazaar 



1514 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY 



KIM CARNES 

MISTAKEN IDENTITY 

INCLUDING: BETTE DAVIS EYES. 
HIT AND RUN, DRAW Of THE CARDS 




KIM CARNES 

Mistaken Identity 

Featuring the powerful single 
' Bette Davis Eyes ", Kim 
Carnes third EMI America LP, 
Mistaken Identity is destined 
to become the vehicle which 
will take her to a new plateau 
in an already acclaimed career 






From Capitol/EMI 

629 



each TAPE 



TUBES 

The Completion 
Backward Principle 




GARYU.S.BONDS 

DEDICATION 

INCLUDING: JOLE' BLON, THIS LITTLE GIRL, 
, IT'S ONLY LOVE 




BILLY SQUIER 

Don't Say No 







I 



p^miMPni 



JyjJMWAlXi 



■ 



wkws 



.; 



L / 



mm* 



Save Up To 50% I *> ck T ™.5lTZ, Away! 

■ I i = "Si from CBS Records rio7»w^r- 



On Selected: 




<t> Samsonite 



Tennis Bogs 

Sport Bags 

Shoulder Bogs 

Tote Bogs 

Sunstar Luggage| 

Lark —Ventura 

Diane Von 
Furstenberg 

Samsonite 

And Other 
Famous Brands 

ALSO! 

Vi Price 



Samsonite Concord Sale 

HIGH FLYING SAVINGS* 

ON SPECIALLY SELECTED ITEMS 





fve Got The Rock 




02 ®«^ 



ttasSfc 



ozz 



HE 



?~5%S2£ 



Slack 



36812 



, extremely contagious 



'•ad 
and 



Sabbath 



'ege 



»*«&fcL*» 



album 



a new 



H-«Y»* M- ' 1 ^^nCnwrt«<» 






band 









___^ ' Kee P On 



Super Summer Sounds 

From RCA 





1514 Hancock St. 

Quincy, Mass. 

Phone 773-2089 



Hours: 

Mon. Thurs. & Fri. 9-9 

Tues. Wed. & Sat. 9-5:30 




visa- 
999SSSSS56 




ON THE SIDEWALK 

THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY 

JULY 16-17-18 




1479 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY 

Open Monday & Thursday & Friday Evenings Till 9 P.M. 



You'll Find 

PAVAROTTI 



HERE! 



f& 



■tf& 



iUMxmoGnw.1 

SUTHERIAND HORNE RVAROTTl 

LIVE FROM I INCC M N ( hNTl R 

BONYNGE 




PAVAROTTI 

MYOWN STORY 




w\mwm k 






R\VARCTm«OSOLEMIO 

Favorite Pleapolitan Songs 

Torna a Surriento- Funiculi Funicula 

And 10 Others 





JASON'S 



1514 HANCOCK ST. 
QUINCY 
773-2089 




mm 



AT OUR SIDEWALK SUNDAE BOOTH 

sundaes 

REGISTER TO WIN A MONTH OF 

31 

FREE SUNDAES 

Sidewalk Specials 
M0A-M0A PUNCH 
Reg. 19' large 29' 
Super 49* 




Coupon 
$1.00 off 



offer expires 
July 31, 1981 



on any cake 
with this ad 



U8BHHBBDB 
ICE CREAM STORE 



QUINCY 

1434 HANCOCK ST 

QUINCY CENTER 

479-9564 




Open 7 Days 
10 a.m. to 11 p.m. 



Save up to $200 on these "In Store Sidewalk" Specials 



V I 



Solid Pine Bunk Bed 

*297 



Reg. '399 
Save <102 



Sturdy solid pine construction with 
bolt on rails tor added stability. 
Mattresses extra. 



W*W 



4 Pc. Twin Outfit 



$ 147 



SERTA twin size mattress, matching 
foundation, spindle style twin size 
headboard steel bed frame. 



4 Drawer 

Maple or 

Pine Chest 



Choose either glowing maple or pine 
finish. 



fT)\.*»»1 



i • » V 

m - • Z. 



Save $ 72. 

M97 



^4 



Save $ 52. 

$ 297 



»,■% 



■a ■■— * ■ ■ n 






7 :;:;.. T* 



COUNTRY COLONIAL 

SOFA, LOVESEAT AND MATCHING CHAIR 

Finally a quality colonial style livingroom at a 
low sale price. This livingroom is authentically 
styled with high backs, thick 6' polyfoam cushions, 
full pleated skirt, and richly tufted 100% herculon 
upholstery. Reg. »699 

YOUR CHOICE 

$ 597 



*m\ m-\ n 






-5» 



~v. 



imm 



4 PIECE ALL WOOD COLONIAL 
MASTER BEDROOM SUITE i,l« 

The glowing pine finish will add an extra 
touch to your bedroom. Enjoy the beautiful 
Early American style 7 drawer triple dresser, 
with the galleried hutch mirror, the roomy 
5 drawer chest, and the queen or full size 
cannonball headboard. Raj. '799 



/fi 



m m 



/ 7/ 



I 



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J* M~ 



Sleep Sofa Sale 

MMiFDN lOVFtFAT CIFFPFD + _ Al _ 

$ 197 



■ a '.a. 



Save '102. 

*397 



• • • 



■ •_£. 



. E •_£. 



MODERN LOVESEAT SLEEPER 

Great for apartments, spare rooms, 
camps and cottages. . . covered in a 
durable Herculon fabric and opens to a 
comfortable bed. 

FULL SIZE COLONIAL SLEEPER 

■y\ High back colonial styling at an 
outstanding low sale price. Durable 
100% Herculon upholstery. Opens to a 
full size bed. 

QUEEN SIZE TRADITIONAL SLEEPER 

This superbly styled sofa opens to a 
large queen size bed that sleeps two in 
magnificent comfort. 



$ 297 
*397 



Reg. $ 269. 
Save s 72. 

Reg. $ 349. 
Save $ 52. 

Reg. $ 499. 
Save M02. 



incaide 



V ( i nf it ,u tt)09 Hani ock S/ 



• FREE • FREE 
DELIVERY SET UP 



• FREE 
LAYAWAY 



• IN STORE 
CREDIT PLAN 



Take the S.E. Xway to Furnace Brook Pkwy right to Hancock St. 
Park Free in our own private lot (Rear of Store) 



Open Every Nite 'til 9 Saturdays 'til 5:30 



SEEING IS BELIEVING 




THREE 
DAYS ONLY 

JULY 
16, 17, 18 

COME 
EARLYI 



the "Blockbuster Buys 

• FASHIONS FOR LADIES - JUNIORS - MEN - YOUNG MEN 



// 



FINE CHINA - CRYSTAL - GIFTS 
LINENS AND LEATHERS, MORE! 



USED OFFICE EQUIPMENT — 
DISPLAY PIECES — FLOOR SAMPLES 



American Express, Major Credit Cards — Phone 773-8000 

SHOP 10 AM TO 5:30 MON, TUES, WED, SAT 
10 AM TO 9 PM THURSDAY AND FRIDAY 




OP QUI 



C Y 



Sklcwalrc 

Sale 



Our entire stock of Summer 

Merchandise is now further 

reduced with savings of up to 



fl 



off regular prices 



108 Parkingwoy 471-8084 

Monday thru Friday 10 - 9 Saturday 10 -6 



99 -*- 



NORMAN'S 



ARMY& 
NAVY STORE 



I 



v 



9 Revere Rd., Quincy ._- „ nft _ 
OFF HANCOCK STREET '*' ym ° vv/ 
M-Thms. 9-6 Fri. 9-7 Sat. 8:30-5:30 

Beat Inflation 

At Norman's 
For Fantastic Savings 

FINAL SUMMER SALE 

j Wrangler Jackets ^ 05 

l Carpenters Jeans ii.95«> 

painters Jeans ^ for 23.00. 



Save On 
Foot Lockers 
Duffle Bags 
All Sizes 
All Styles 



NEW 

Ju "g/e Boots 
Amy Cots 

*?T B/onfcets 

* !'»'V Patches 
Military Belts 

Br <*nd New D n. • 

ta^Jocket ° en,n \ . 

6.50 



NEW 

19.95 
19.95 
16.95 



Come In And Browse Around For 
Many Many More Items At Big Savings 






'■■'< : y.y : . : :"':. 



■■ 



INSIDE OUTSIDE 




be* 



vo>* 










4 



4 










0' 



W>r» 



He e<JS > "Bectt' ,e 



1 ' 



,tt *° ' 







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5 prt°i. 

0\r 



$99- 



•ff 



1 



"*»,■ 



Ma"V 



Ottie' 



Oine«es on 
Wood- 



* * «T FO £ ,C8 Lon9- 
OP 8 "* . 4 SW ,dv 



>e IS*?*! 

Coion' 3 !^— .as)*] 



• 3 DAYS ONLY! THURS., FRI., SAT., JULY 16 17-18 DON'T MISS OUT! 
SPECIALS ARE ALSO INSIDE Air Conditioned for Your Shopping Comfort 



EVERY SOFA • EVERY CHAIR • EVERY LOVESEAT • EVERY SLEEPER 
REDUCED! REDUCED! REDUCED! REDUCED! 

Be your own Decorator... .Choose any style.... Choose any Fabric, Herculon, Prints, Nylons, Plaids, | 
Velvets, etc. Remember They Are All Reduced For This Fantastic Sale. 

SMART 



LOOSE 

PILLOW 

BACK 



Smooth Modern Lines - Extra Thick 
Seat Cushion* - Loose Pillow Backs lor 
Super Comlort - Reversible Seat 
Cushions. 




HIGH 

BACK 

EARLY 

AMERICAN 

Exceptional Comlort - Exti 
High Channel Stitched Backs 
- Heavy Wood Trim on Arms 
A Wings. Skirts All Around. 

SOFA CHAIR LOVE 
ONLY ONLY SEAT 

REG. >409 REG. >2B9 REG. >359 

$ 305. $ 170. $ 250. 




QUEEN 
SLEEPER 

REG. '539 

$ 425. 



MODERN >Sf-*<*«^ 

bold ys&rr^^- 

STYLING 0'G>" ' 



6" Thick Rolled Front Reversible Seat Cushions. 
Ball Casters - Extra arm Bolsters on sota and Love 
Seat - Fantastic!! 

SOFA CHAIR LOVE FULL QUEEN 
ONLY ONLY SEAT SLEEPER SLEEPER**. 
REG. »319.REG. M79.REG. «269. REG. '419. REG. »469. 

$ 211.$109. $ 175. $ 290. $ 321. 




TRADITIONALLY! 
HANDSOME 

Rich Quilted 100% Cotton Floral Covers. Tailored 
With Loose Pillow Backs - Reversible Seat 
Cushions - Arm Bolsters - Skirts All Around. 

SOFA CHAIR LOVE QUEEN 
ONLY ONLY SEAT SLEEPER 

REG. «459. REG. »219. REG. »419. REG. '599. 

$ 335. *178. 



*273. $ 455. 






QUILTED 
PATTERN 



OAK PLATFORM BEDS 

Extra Sturdy Built Bed - Includes Large 5' Long Roll 
Out Storage Drawer. (Additional Drawer 
Avail. Choose Dark-Medium- 
Light Finish. 

CHOOSE ANY SIZE 
TWIN-FULL-QUEEN 

REG 
•269. 



$189. 




SEE OUR MATTRESS 
SALE ON THE 
BACK PAGE 



DISCOUNT FURNITURE and SLEEP SHOP 



1486 HANCOCK ST. 
QUINCY - TEL 471-6180 

OPEN THURS. ft FRI. EYES 

VISA - MASTERCHARGE 

AMERICAN EXPRESS AND 

LONGER TERMS AVAIL 

SEE OUR OTHER ADV ON THE BACK PAGE 



Summertime 
Savings 

from 

McDonald's 



McDonalds 

■ I® 



Enjoy a Free Large Sandwich 
with the purchase of any 
Large Sandwich.* 
Just bring this coupon 
into participating 
McDonalds® and enjoy! 



• (Big Mac® Sandwich, Quarter Pounder® Sandwich [weight before cooking 4 ox. [1 1 3.4 
gin]] Quarter Pounder* with Choose Sandwich, McChicfcon® Sandwich, Filet-O-Fiih- 
Sandwich.) 



COUPON 




YOUR CHOICE! 



BUY ONE, GET ONE FREE 

You con hove any large sandwich Free 
when you buy any large sandwich. 

D Big Mac® Sandwich 

□ Quarter Pounder® with cheese Sandwich 

D Quarter Pounder® Sandwich 

D McChicken® Sandwich 

D Filet-O-Fish® Sandwich 

Offer good only at McDonald's 



North Weymouth 

(191 Bridge Street 
Rt. 3A) 

• Hanover 

(Rt. 53 Opposite 
Hanover Mall) 

• Braintree 
(Pearl St.) 



O Weymouth 

(Rt. 18 Caldor 
Shopping Center) 

• East Braintree 

(411 Quincy Ave. 
Opposite Quintree Mall) 



• Dorchester 

(515 Gallivan Blvd.) 

• Quincy 

(473 Southern Artery 
By Roxies) 

• Marshfield 

(Marshfield Ctr.) 




Mr. Operator: Return to above address for reimbursement. 
Redemption value 1 20 
McDonalds Corporation, 1981 



Offer expires July 26, 1981 
limit one coupon per customer per visit. 



Get a 

free balloon 

and save some money. 



Just come by our Quincy Center office during 
Sidewalk Bazaar Days. 




Member FDIC/DIFM 
471-3500 







se\ec 



**&£** _^ 



RS^ 



**£*«* 



*%&»*. 



B0<©- 



today's young fashion place! 




1535 HANCOCK ST. 



1489 Hancock Street 
Quincy Center 
773-1888 




rr 



,\ \ 






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Store Hours: 

Daily 9-6 

Mon., Thunt.. Fri. 

Evenings Til 9 



• CURTAINS • DRAPERIES • linens Lay- \ w ay 




vrsvr 



Tremendous Savings on 

MULTIPLE WIDTH 
DRAPERIES 

Choose from a variety of top Qualify draperies both lined and unlined. NOT 
all styles available in all sizes. 

TRIPLES (144"x84") regular retails up to si25»o now $ 30°° 
TWO and a HALF (120"x84") regular retails up to *95»o now $ 25°° 
PATIO PANELS (96"x84") Sale priced at *35<»° now $20 00 
ONE and a HALF (72"x84") regular retails up to *50<»> now $15 00 



Seeded Voile 

SHIR-BACK® 
CURTAINS 




54' 
63' 

72' 
81' 



By CAMEO 

Just pull the tape for 
a perfect drape. 

WHITE • EGGSHELL 

BANANA* BLUE 

limited quantities 

Reg. Sale 

$16.99 $12.00 

18.99 14.00 

19.99 15.00 

20.99 16.00 



Limited quantities of multiple widths 
50% OFF 



100% Cotton 

BED SPREAD 

By CANNON 

1st Quality machine washable, tumble dry 
100% cotton throw style fringed 
Bedspread. 



NATURAL BLEND" 



WHITE • ANTIQUE 

Reg. Sale 

TWIN 32.99 $25.00 

FULL 38.99 $30.00 

QUEEN 48.99 $35.00 



Ninon 

TAILORED CURTAINS 

Our basic 100" polyester ninon curtains, 

82" wide to the PAIR 




Look for 

UNADVERTISED 

SPECIALS 

IN 

EVERY 

DEPARTMENT 



WHITE • 


IVORY 


• ROSE • 




GOLD • BLUE 






Reg. 


Sale 


82"x54" 


$8.49 


$6.50 


82'x63" 


9.49 


7.00 


82"x72" 


9.99 


7.50 


82"x81" 


10.99 


8.00 



Save 50% 

BATH ACCESSORIES 

Many discontinued ceramic accessory 
pieces to accent your bath. 

EXAMPLE: PALLETTE 

PINK* TIGER •LILAC 

Reg. Sale 

TUMBLER 5.99 3.00 

SOAP DISH 6.99 3.50 

TOOTH BRUSH 

HOLDER 7.99 4.00 




10 



bafts Sidewalk 

BONANZA 



line deivctcfid. 



Quantities Limited 

AH SIDE WALK Sales 

Are FINAL 



1422 Hancock St. 
Quincy, MA 

Since 1941 



We Care' 



Side Walk Hours. 

Thurs & Fri. 9 30 - 9 

Sat 9 30 - 5 

M/C - VISA - AMEX 

773-2170 



XIDEIVALK 




*Blouses 36 to 54 

*Slacks 30 to 46 

*Dresses 12 ! 2 to 32'/ 2 

Vests, Skirts, 

Shorts and More!! 



Eileen s 

Special Sizes 

► 12»/ 2 to32»/ 2 , 36 to 54 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

J We Specialize in the 
J Latest Half-Size Fashions 
| at Budget Prices 

30% off 

all Summer 
Merchandise 

Additional 
Selected Items 
up to 50% off 



Quincy's Only Store Specializing in Half-Sizes 

1464 Hancock St., Quincy 479-7870 



(Across From Child World) 
Open 9:30 to 6 Thur& Fri til 9 



VKA 




Everything 
From Our Store 

30% - 50% 



IVe Carry Lionel, 
Athearn, Atlas 

While Supply Lasts 



11 








MADE-TO-ORDER , 

SLIPCOVERS 
& DRAPERIES 

OC%0FF 

U* FABRIC 
AND LABOR 




Featuring the worlds leading brand 
names on two floors 



EVERYTHING 
IN OUR STORE 



KIRSCH 



OH AM A' 
'iVERDALE* 

^DtCOHATtVI TABRU s 



■•■III 



n 

BEACON 




Steven Fab/Oca 

Levolor 

Bl®mcraft 

Beacon 
Fabrics 

1 568 Hancock Street, Quincy 

Downtown 
Open: Daily 10 to 5:30 - Sat. 10-5 

479-8755 



WAVERLY FABRICS 
COVINGTON 

fLouverDrape 





a 




19 



T37 



SALE PRICES GOOD 



3 DAYS ONLY 

QUINCY CENTER STORE 

1 453 HANCOCK STREET 



rienolv Family Centers 

We've gone all outdoors to give you 
the hottest buys of summer. Don't 
miss your share of the bargains! 



sideu/afk days 



w? 



Ill 



DELUXE. 
PIA$T\C 

3SS 



r ® 



i~r+ "jiff 



•Box of 100 
•5 Oz. Kitchen 
Refill Cups 



&**/ 



Good, 



.?ood 



News! 

By Gillette 

DISPOSABLE 

SHAVERS 



•7 P c 



flpC 



lad** 



Goc/ 



.Good 



\N 



•8pc 



ashei 
Cover 



Set 
ed 



FOR 



WE 



RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. 

t 



$o\n\ Set 
REG. 2.99 

IS • 






™ By Gillette 
DISPOSABLE 

BUTANE 
LIGHTERS 



S* 



rscf 



I I 



-^i 



FOR 



BABY 
POWDER 

FFC'SOWN 



baby 
powder 



•Giant 24 
Ounce 
Size 



COTTON 
REPLACEMENT 

WET MOPS 

• Mop head fits all sticks 



FOR 



"•"•"mem If 00 'n 

S,ZE 1 2"/* 



!S<&*^. 



TUFFY FIBER 

BROOMS 





II 



FERTILIFE 
JUMBO BAG 

POTTING 
SOIL 

•Perfect for all indoor 

Plants 
•8Qt.-8Lb. Bag 

REG. 1.99 VALUE 



BAG 

■l. ' 

FFC'S OWN 

ISOPROPYL 
ALCOHOL 

16 OZ. FULL 
PINT BOTTLE 



PLANT POTS 




FLIP POT' 
CYLINDER 



6" SIZE 

REG. 79* 



8" SIZE... REG. 1.59 



WOODBURY 

BEAUTY MILDI 

SOAP 

Regular Size Bars 




wM 





w 



FOR 



s 



c 



6 $ 1 
FOR i 



SYLVAN I A 









t**\ 



deFro 
bs 



ost I 



INSIDE 
FROST 
BULBS 



THREE PACK 
60 MINUTE 

CASSETTE 
TAPES 



mm 



BULBS 
FOR 







259i 

si 



IN 
PKG. 



MAGNETIC 

PHOTO ALBUMS 

•20 Page oNo Corner Mounts Needed 

FOR 








FAy nous /m/. ;r 

/ OVVP/ c 



fob 



PRESENTS 



GREAT AMERICAN BUICK 
SIDEWALK SALE DAYS! 



THURSDAY-FRIDAY-SATURDAY 



Buy A New Buick Now 

At Model Year End 

Closeout Prices 

PLUS 

Top Dollar for your Trade 



-JULY 16th, 17th, 18th 

On display on Hancock Street 
In front of Former Sears Store 



$AYE 



$AVE $AYE $AVE 

LOOK AT THESE GREAT BUYS! 



$AVE 



1981 Buick Skylark Cpe 

4 Cyl. Auto Trans.. P.S. P.B. WUj. 
tires, deluxe wheel covers. AM 



Radio 



No. 3660 



*7199 



"81 Buick Regal Cpe 



No. 4682 



$ 7399 



1981 Buick USobre Cpe 

T «ps P.B. Tinted 
« CY, r°ConrR.^e centra. 

9,a *- . Steel Wted radial W.W. "res. 
SS'Sim Body side moulding. 
Silver ^ 

*8599 

No. 4364 



T '98? Buitk p:„. 

window* Ca«tt. M ^ * 88t « & 

•"** coach /ami i!!'' W,r « ""eel 
*o.1l 16 mp< and ">uch more 



^vtflSOO 



°n this or a ny , 

°„ he : R,w ^ 

1" stock 



,981 Century 4 dr Sedon 

.PS P.B. W.W- 
6 cvl. auto tran • P-S , 

srs. rasa* - 



Burgundy. 



No. 0248 



*7599 



»>«; 



p o« 
Air 



Bu 

'oati 
Cond 



/c *fle 



ur e 



incl U(j 



*o. 



■^eavy 
>. 3595 



'ocfc 



«er e , 



">g 






Padded 



ing 

Vinyl 

ires 



*/ta, 
Wire 

roof. 



W'ndo 



Pe. 



and 



wheel 
Stee/ 
more. 



«e fli 



ited 



seats, 
def. 



cover*, 
fae/ted 



Be 



'»e. 



I o n 
°the 



tt>/s 



Or 



<n 



Stock 



any 



ra 



Check out 

one of these Fine 

Used Car Values. 



uth 



1979 BUICK REGAL 

6 cyl. Air Conditioned 
landau Roof - #12-322 

*5999 


1978 CHEVROLET CAPRICE 

Classic Cpe. Air Conditioned 
Canopy Top • #3-65 

M988 


1978 BUICK ELECTRA 

Cpe. Full power. Bought New & 
Serviced at South Shore Buick #3-87 

'5788 


1979 PONTIAC SUNBIRD 

4 cyl. auto trans. 

Economy Plus. OS-183 

*4177 


78 BUICK SKYLARK 

6 cyl. Cpe. 26,000 Miles 

#6-1978 

*4277 


1 979 BUICK REGAL CPE. 

Former Lease Vehicle 
From our private fleet. #6-190P 

'4988 


1979 BUICK ELECTRA 

Air Cond. Sun Roof 
Stereo etc. - #6-204 

»7499 


1978 FORD FAIRMONT 

Cpe. Tu-Tone Paint 
19,000 Miles - #7-214 
. *4988 


1979 AMC SPIRIT 

Hatchback 6 cyl. 
Air Conditioned #7-217 

'4387 


1979 BUICK REGAL LIMITED CPE. 

23,000 miles from our lease fleet. 
Very clean. 97-220P 

*5988 


1977 BUICK REGAL 

6 cyl. Cpe. 
Air Conditioned & much more #6-211 

*4377 


1979 BUICK ELECTRA UNITED 

Sedan. One Owner 
Full power. #4-129 

*6999 



Reputation is Everything! 



50 ADAMS STREET QUINCY 



472-4520 



^ QUINCY 



Big Savings on Housewares, Shoes, Furniture, Ready to Wear 



at our 




Modern 
Music Center 




Sale 



Easy-to-assemble particle- 
board unit with slide-out 
center shelf. Walnut finish. 
Size47 3 /4" x 15%" x 30". 





Disposable 
Lighters 

O for 



Triple Pack 
Cracker Jacks 



packs for 





16 Pack 
Drip-Dry 
Hangers 



! pkg. 

16-Pack Drip-Dry Hangers 
for blouses, shirts, etc. 
Yellow and Brown. 




Basketweave 
Fern Stand 



Sale 



4.97 



Reg. 5.99 



J 



1V round, 22" high in 
natural wood and wicker. 



Bilt- 
Rite 





Sale 



33 



Reg. 12.99 



The "Mighty 1200" Light- 
weight hair dryer. 




Potting Soil 



Baby Stroller folds up like 
an umbrella to carry or 
store. Sturdy steel 
construction, polyester 
construction, polyester/ 
cotton plaid seat. 



Sale 



Reg. 23.95 



8 Qt. Potting Soil 

Sale ^J27^r Reg. 1.59 

All purpose soil for all your 
potting needs. 




Wicker Look 
Upright Hamper 

In brown, white or natural 

Reg. 19.99 

Sale 



$12 




SOf r.VMKIT E | 



GE 4-Pock 
Light bulbs 

Sale 

1.50 




3 Shelf 
Etagere 




\ ai Timiimi 



Sale 



Reg. 19.99 



Soft White 
75, 100 Watt 



Reg. 3.72 



Versatile unit, 
wipe-clean. Brown or white 
plastic. 



Laundry 
Detergent 

our own brand 



Sale 



3.88 

9 lbs., 3 oz. 



Reg. 4.86 




Sale 



Coleman 
Oscar Cooler 

1 2 88 



Reg. 18.57 




20" Breeze 
Box Fan 

3 Speed 

With carrying handle. 

$0-| 88 



Reg. 27.95 Sale 




Tube Hose 

C47 



Sale 



Reg. 6.97 



Over-the-calf hose. Ultra 
fresh cotton/polyester. Fits 
10-13. 



Time -Zero 
Supercolor 




SX-70 Time Zero 
Sale 6.99 

25 to 50% Off 

On All Summer 

Wearables 

& Shoes 



16 



Our Biggest 

Clearance Sale Ever! 



14 Kt Gold 5QO/ 

Larger Earrings ff 

(including Rams, Dolphins, Shrimp, Shells) 



Back By Popular Demand 



Broken Chain 



Clinic 



Any Sterling Silver Chain. 
Bracelet or Charm, 2 5 % off 

(many stylts and lengths to choose from) 



'Any 14 Kt. 

[or Sterling 

! Silver 

Chain Repaired 
>cooeocoo< 



*3!? 



incoming 
orderj 



only 



1 4 Kt. Gold Charm & Chain 
CLEARANCE 

Red Dot Special 25% «« 



any item marktd with a red dot 
many out of a kind 



Giftware & Glassware 

25% off 

Storewide Clearance 
of all Jewelry Items 

1, 2, & 3 for a $1°° 

(not including MKt. Sterling Silver, or G.F.) 



1 4 Kt. Gold Chains 

15" Serpentine *12 90 

18" Serpentine *19 90 

20" Serpentine *29 90 

24" Serpentine $35 90 

20" Cobra *39 90 

30" Sparkle Serp. '39" 



1 4 Kt. Gold Charms 

Shells, butterfly, $#QA 

clovers, puffed *0 

hearts, many others , ... 
, .. (small) 

at discount prices 



I 






Many Other In-Store Specials 

PHASE II 

DISCOUNT JEWELRY 

1361 Hancock St., Quincy Square 472-6618 Lav away 



1 min from 
MBTA 




ROOTS 



Our roots .ire here. 

Like the giant oak, we're established 

in this community. We're locally owned and managed. 

We intend to stay here. With no interruption in the 

way we've been banking with vou since 1915. 

Our aim is service. And to 

grow with you. 

HANCOCK BANK 



In Quinc\ I4VS Han*. nek Streei (Main OffWe), I'airuia Cibotli, Manager 

20 Beak Sired. I loyd Williams. Manager • 4 ) 5 Hancock Sired. John McUuc, Managci 

521 Southern Artery John Sullivan. Manager • telephone 77.M15O0 




DIAMONDS $ OLD GOLD 
STERLING SILVER 

we are paying highest prices for your 
unwanted goods during the sidewalk sale. 

9k ■ 10k- 18k -dental gold- anything marked sterling- diamonds in any condition or size- coins 1964 and bejore 

• watches .... rings .... braclets .... necklaces .... earrings .... crowns .... etc. in any condition. 

(Gold filled and silver-plate not wanted.) 

If in doubt we will test the article free for you and make you an offer .... no obligation. 

diamonds . . . watches . . . jewelry Jr^&G^^f/S^ 
1402 hancock street • quincy, mass. 02169 • 773-3636 



17 



Casual Concepts RoiisBack 



WALL UNIT 

2 Doors 



$79' 



save '70 





Prices to 
1965!! 




w a glass 



HaveaCokeandasmile. 

Coike adds life. 



HAMMOCKS 
$-|Q99 




save $ 20 



JffifiH0B&- ; : '■ ■■£$&■'■■■ ■ 




Buy 

A 

Princess 

Peacock 

for 

$3500 

Get a 

Cushion 

for 

$200 




Bird Cages 

3-5-7-10 Story 




$100 

1 Reg. *5 00 

24" Island 
Necklace 




FANS 




Decorate your walls 




Casual 
Concepts 

1637 Hancock St 
Ouincy 471-8167 

Tennis 
Monkey 



$300 



save S 2 C 



18 



Quincy Furniture 

Celebrates the Sidewalk Bazaar 
With Inside Store Bargains 



Four 



x' 



f 



NOW THRU 
SATURDAY 



We can solve your storage problems. Quality, 

all wood construction. Five easy-slide drawers 

with stops. Scalloped dust proof base. Fine 

furniture finish. 



Hollywood Beds 

MATTRESS • BOX SPRING • HEADBOARD 

• BED FRAME 



ALL FOR 
ONLT 



A 



4^ 



>$ 



L>"\ 



-V 



?189 



For only $189 you get a complete Hollywood bed. 

Superbly constructed, smartly styled. Choice of 

headboards available. Save with this price. 



QUINCY FURNITURE 

1604 HANCOCK STREET 479-1715 



Presidential 

Cooperative Bank 



Continues To 
Pay The — - 




—Interest 

Rates Allowed 

By Law — - 

On 6 Month Money 
Market Accounts 



Minimum Deposit $10,000 

Interest Paid Monthly 
AH Accounts Insured In Full 




& 



(011*1 HOUSMt 

omtrumr 




fr-efeemtiw 




Op«n Saturdays 
9 A.M. to 1 P.M. 



NO. 1 GRANITE STREET 
QUINCY 

The Bank On The Corner 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN 
THE HEART OF QUINCY SQUARE 

773-2040 773-2041 



Welcome to 



FORD 



Quirk 

S40 Southern Artery, Quincy 

(Formerly President Chev.) 

Open For: 

• SALES • SERVICE • PARTS 

400 New and Used 

Cars in Stock for 
Immediate Delivery 

770-0070 



19 



ONCE-A-YEAR 



J 



fe^spoS™* 



GOODS 










SPORTS 
FOOTWEAR 

MEN • WOMEN • KIDS 




Ba rgains 



Act"« n 



in Every 



pep* 



You Won 



KevetheSo^ 



/s? * 



SPECTACULAR 



SAVE BIG 



Treme ndous Buy! 

SHIRTS 

jjen » Women . K, d$ 






'«*Brl 






Money's 

Worth 

Buys 



Jk 



SHORTS - shorts 

shorts shorts shorts 




$10 



Men * Women * Kids 



QUINC Y ,630 „ H , a «Vo st - CANTON Cob 8 ^.f 7 °;r 



828-1780 



Pictures Are For 
Illustration Only 



VISA 



oQ 



20 



Open 

Thurs. & Fri. 

Till 9:00 



THE 

* " ^^ ^^ formerly 

SHOE TRAP iflHMfftfi 



M* ' 



C A 



en 



Quincy, West Roxbury, N. Andover 

1474A HANCOCK ST. QUINCY 471-1729 

ALL SUMMER SHOES 
NOTHING HELD BACK!! 




«w 







• Values to * 7 0.00 



I 



// 



IT'S WORTH TH 




OUT 

TRIP TO THE SHOE TRAP 



// 



A.E. GOODHUE 




he leader for everything 
in the religious line. 



We also have the best 
trophy and plaque 

values anywhere. 



For the sports and business world, 
If it's an Award, WE HAVE IT! 

When Quality Counts, 
Goodhue Stands Alone. 

A.E. GOODHUE 

1315 School Street Quincy 472-3090 

LOCATED ACROSS 
FROM FIRESTONE 



-/, 





• * 




* 



Winter Is Just Around 

The Corner, So Why 

Not Take Advantage of 

Quincy's Annual 

Sidewalk Sale 

Protect against rising costs 

while taking advantage of 

a great sale. 

Small deposit will hold any item. 



15% 
OFF 

any stove 
in stock 

choose from 




l 

Russo Chappee 

Penn Energy Harvester 

American-Stovalator 



Sunworks 
Solar Systems 

Newmack & 

H.B. Smith coal 

wood Boilers 

Weil Mclein 

Oil & Gas 

Fired Boilers 

Your 1 stop 
Energy 
Center 




4Tc 

Window Quilt 

stops the great 
heat escape! 

New kind of thermal 

shade cuts window heat 

loss up to 79% 

10% OFF 



Sale 
Starts 

7/16/81 



& 



13 School St., Quincy 
471-2277 



(tV&l 



Sale 
Ends 

7/20/81 



VISA 



21 



How we paid out 

more than $9,000,000 

and were thrilled to do it . . . 

$9,309,110 



That is what we paid our depositors in interest for the fiscal year 
closing April 30, 1981. 
The amount was $1,737,802 more than the preceding year. That's 

an increase of 22.9%. 

And we folks at The Quincy Cooperative Bank are happy that we 
have been able to disburse these several millions to our faithful and 
wonderful shareholders. Quite candidly, it gives us a good feeling. 

This large amount indicates how our customers' money has been 
working for them. Our handsome interest total has been achieved 
because we always pay the highest interest allowed by law. Being a 
cooperative bank, our shareholders are our owners. We have no 

stockholders. 

Thus, as we make money, it goes to our shareholders within the 
limits set by the U.S. Government. 

If you are not a member of our family of shareholders shouldn't you 
consider joining us? After all, you can join up for as little as a dollar — 
but you really should deposit more so we can give you our high return 
on your dollars. 

the Quincy cooperative bank 



Offices 

1259 Hancock Street, Quincy 

Tedeschi's Plaza, Route 3A, Cohasset 

Routes 53 and 139, Hanover 

Tedeschi's Plaza, 280 Grove Street, Braintree 

1000 Southern Artery, Quincy (Limited Service) 




22 



Banking in Quincy is 
as easy as one, two, three, 

One. 




60 Quincy Shore Drive, North Quincy 



It^ffl We've got Something Better® tor all 
I your banking needs. 
Tel: 328-7350 






Bay/Banks 



Two. 



1381 Hancock Street, Quincy Square 

fe*1pi Get instant casn . 24 nours a da y with 
n : | BayBanksX-Press24.™ 

w^ &H Tel: 479-5200 

,v '" sssSS-SSv. T'^' ■.'••-3 




SUPER SALE 




n 



R£ 



■,.!£S 60 McGrath Highway, Quincy 

CilW IT ; With still another X-Press 24— one of 

i more than 175 around Massachusetts. 



Tel: 472-2303 



Baysank \ Norfolk Trust 



Member FDIC 




MILLER SHOES 

1546 Hancock St., Quincy 
472-2794 




OUTH 

SHORE ARMY & NAVY STORE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy Square 471-3780 



Store Hours 

Won., Thurs., Fri. 9:30-9:00 

Tues., Wed., Sot. 9:30-5:30 



urn "T^ n 



W *» <V1 

^l/V\ A. a if* 



Military T-Shirts 

USMC Airborn U.S. Navy U.S. Army 



$099 

W Reg. *5" 



23 



South Shore Army & Navy 

SLASH PRICES 



MAAA/M 






First Quality- Not an odd lot 
Boy & Student Sizes in Lee Only 



Y ' Mens Sizes 28 38 7* #wtvV 



Jordache 
BonJour 
Calvin Klein 




JDlfoott Active Wear 

TENNIS - SWIM 20% off 
JOGGINP TICKET PRICE 





OUTH 

SHORE ARMY & NA VY STORE 

1617 HANCOCK ST. 
QUINCY SQUARE 471-3780 

Store Hours MON., THURS., FRI. 9:30-9:00-TUES., WED., SAT., 9:30-5:30 



ti II 



t m i ft cifi 



1 i If 




3 DAYS 
ONLY! 

THURSDAY JULY 16, 1981 

FRIDAY JULY 17, 1981 
SATURDAY JULY 18, 1981 




SALE! 



TO 



$070 





King Koil 

SPINAL GUARD 

... the mattress thatl 
Y) chiropractors 
1 **' helped design* 



39" TWIN SIZE 
SUGGESTED RETAIL $320 

2 PIECE 

MATTRESS AND 

FOUNDATION 

SET 

OTHER SIZES 

FULL SIZE 

2 PIECE SET 

QUEEN SIZE 

2 PIECE SET 

KING SIZE 



$168 



SUGGESTED 
RETAIL 



SALE 
PRICE 



3 PIECE SET 



$400.00 $238.00 

$470.00 $288.00 

$650.00 $378.00 



'Spinal Guard was designed with the help of the International 
Chiropractors Association For their assistance. ICA receives a 
royalty from King Koil to further the work of the chiropractic 
profession 



YOU MAY PURCHASE INDIVIDUAL PIECES AT SPECIAL PRICES 

A Spinal Guard mattress helps you sleep in a level position all 

night long. It guards against morning back ache caused by 

sleeping on a too soft mattress. Spinal Guard provides extra 

support for the important center area of your body — the heaviest part. 

The center 1/3 of the mattress is reinforced with stronger springs to 

give you back support where you need it most. The support is firm . . . 

yet comfortable. Thanks to luxurious layers of cushioning between you and 

the coil unit. And Flex-Edge border supports give you edge-to-edge 

sleeping and a firm sitting edge. King Koil Spinal Guard. A sleep set 

designed to keep you sleeping straight. 



COMPANION SIDEWALK SPECIAL 







feEggSP? 



■^ 



&J 



Kl 



m 



■>» 



wr 



x 



?*&*> 



wm 



%^mm^ 



^r. 



warn. 



m 



DISCOUNT FURNITURE & SLEEP SHOP 



Koil ORTHO-DELUXE 

MATTRESSES AND FOUNDATIONS 

TWIN FULL QUEEN KING 

SIZE SIZE SIZE SIZE 

SET SET SET SET 

REG. $ 189. REG. $ 249. REG. $ 299. REG. J 399 

*118$168 $218 $288 

INDIVIDUAL PIECES AVAILABLE AT SPECIAL PRICES! 

Heavy Channel Quilted innerspring Mattress with 
Hundreds of Extra Firm Coils and layer upon layer of 
Cushioning. The Supporting Foundation is best for 
durability and support. 

DOWNTOWN QUINCY 

1 486 HANCOCK ST (corner of cottage ave) 
TELEPHONE 471-61 80 open mon thurs fri eves 

MASTERCHARGE - VISA - AMERICAN EXPRESS & OTHERS. 
NOTE: SEE PAGE 7 FOR MORE SIDEWALK DEALS 



THOMAS CRANE PUBlK mM 
40 WASHINGTON SL 



I .;, ||! 



•\ ll 



/.fU.i« I'; 



.,. .-,, | 





Vol. IJ No. 43 



Thursday, July 23, 1981 





BETH STRENGE, 21, of Eastern Nazarene College, Hashes the victor's 
smile after being chosen Miss Quincy Bay for 1981. Story, other 
photos Page 8. (Quincy Sun Photo by Rick Matthew*) 



MBTA Fare 

Increase Draws 

Loud 'No' 



"It went well," said shirt- 
sleeved James F. O'Leary, the 
general manager of the MBTA. 
"We heard some specific 
complaints that we plan to follow 
upon." 

But the biggest complaint 
probably won't be pursued. 

Most of the 150 people who 
jammed the City Council 
Chamber at City Hall Monday 
night for a hearing into a 
proposed MBTA fare hike just 
didn't want the fare hike at all -- 
except in the unlikely event it 
could be tied in with improved 
service. 

O'Leary said the fare increases 
would likely cost the MBTA 10 
per cent of its ridership but after 
60 to 90 days the riders would 
return "once they realize there 
are no alternatives according to 
cost. 

He said the MBTA would shut 
down in November if the fare 
boost were not put into effect, as 
planned, on Aug. 1. 

Under the proposal, the basic 
fare for rapid transit lines would 
go up 25 cents, from 50 to 75 
cents. Fares from the three 
existing Quincy stations to Boston 



would be altered like this: 

North Quincy: Now, $1 in- 
bound, 50 cents outbound. 
Proposed, 75 cents inbound, 75 
cents outbound. 

Wollaston: Now, $1 inbound, 
50 cents outbound. Proposed, 75 
cents inbound, 75 cents 
outbound. 

Quincy Center: Now, $1 in- 
bound, 50 cents outbound. 
Proposed, $1.50 inbound, 75 
cents outbound, for a new total of 
$2.25 round trip. 

Fares from Braintree and the 
Quincy Adams station, when it 
opens, would be $3 for a round 
trip, up from the current $2. 

The proposal divides the 
MBTA's rapid transit system into 
zones, with North Quincy and 
Wollaston in Zone 1. Quincy 
Center in Zone 2, and Quincy 
Adams and Braintree the only 
Zone 3 stops in the whole system. 

Rep. Michael W. Morrissey 
could see problems arising from 
the unbalanced fares in Quincy. 

"Pretty soon," he said, "we're 
going to have an access road, 
Burgin Parkway, from the south 

(Cnnl'thtn Ptti(v2-I) 



Public Hearing Thursday 

Tobin Sees Connector 
Vote 'Major Victory' 

By TOM HENSHAW 

Two groups of downtown Quincy businessmen have taken a hard look at the 
proposed East- West Connector on the eve of today's (Thursday) hearing by the 
State DPW at 4:30 p.m. in City Hall. 

.One group went for it overwhelmingly; the other opposed it by a narrow 
margin. 



Progress for Downtown Quincy 
(PDQ), meeting Tuesday 
afternoon, voted 14-0 with three 
abstentions in favor of the 
controversial highway. 

Mayor Arthur H. Tobin, a 
connector advocate, called it a 
"major victory." 

Earlier Tuesday, the Quincy 
Center Business and Professional 
Association went against it 
narrowly 24-9 in opposition by 
those present and 18-8 in favor by a 
telephone poll. The total: 32-27 
against. 

'That's not bad," said Tobin. "I 
expected worse than that from 
what I have been hearing." 

The QCBPA then adopted the 
following statement, composed by 
Elliott Cohen of Cumming's. to be 
read at the State DPW hearing on 
the Connector today at 4:30 p.m. 
in City Hall: 

"The Quincy Center Business 
and Professional Association, 
while in favor of progress and 
improvement for Quincy in 
general and the downtown area in 
particular, cannot in good 
conscience approve of the 
suggested cross-town connector. 

"We do not feel the project has 
been thought out to a proper 
conclusion and does not contain 
any commitment to growth or 
construction of a bigger and better 
downtown community. 

"We remain ready to assist in 



and/ or reconsider this project 
when there are definite proposals 
and commitments for new 
construction and proper use of 
properties taken for said road. 

"We are not against progress. 
The QCBPA has long endorsed the 
extension of Upland Rd. as crucial 
to the future of downtown Quincy. 

"But we feel we must see a 
definite commitment for 
improvement in our downtown 
area in order to fully support the 
cross-town connector." 

The East-West Connector, also 
known as the cross-town 
connector and the Revere Rd. 
connector, would cut through the 
heart of downtown Quincy under 
Hancock St., connecting east and 
west sides. 

It would offer access to the 
downtown shopping area from the 
proposed Burgin Parkway 
(Upland Rd.) Extension, which 
would open up Quincy to traffic 
from the south. 

One of the major objections 
expressed at the QCBPA meeting 
was that the connector would cut 
off the south section of Hancock 
St. from the rest of Quincy Square. 

"Anyone south of the road on 
Hancock St. would be isolated," 
said Charlie Ryder of Ryder's, 
whose store is north of the road. 

"The potential two-year 
disruption of business during the 
construction period is too high a 



price to pay for a cross-town road. 
I can't support it." 

Jack Allegrini of Paperama, 
which is located in the Parkingway 
where the connector would cross 
the MBTA tracks, said he was 
skeptical of the whole Burgin 
Parkway-Connector plan. 

"Remember," he said, "these are 
two-way streets. 1 see it as a direct 
access to the South Shore Plaza. It 
would be detrimental to the 
downtown area." 

John R. Herbert, president of 
the Quincy Cooperative Bank, 
warned that "without the 
connector, the future of Hancock 
St. is in jeopardy. A whole new 
shopping area will develop from 
Grossman's south along Penn St. 
The connector is critical to 
Quincy." 

The vote taken at the meeting 
came up 28 opposed and nine 
against but four "no" votes were 
deleted because some organiza- 
tions had two representatives at 
the meeting. Only one is eligible to 
vote. 

QCPBA President Bernard 
Reisberg said the telephone poll 
taken Monday showed 18 in favor, 
eight against, five undecided and 
30 unavailable for comment. The 
QCBPA has 117 members. 

Reisberg read a letter from J udie 
Cullen of the Planning 
Department informing the 

(Cant 'il on I'n/tv 2) 




EVEN A MONKEY needs time out for a rest and a cold drink as JoJo demonstrates with his owner, or|an 
grinder Bob Delvental of West Roxbury during a break from their act at the annual downtown Sidewalk 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dave Gitlooly) 



P«f« 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 23, 1981 




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Premature redemption requires a substantial 
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CLOWNS in front of Quincy Savings Bank pass out balloons to young and old alike adding to the festive 

atmosphere at the Sidewalk Bazaar. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dave Gillooly) 

Connector Public Hearing Thursday 



(Cont'd from Pafiv I) 

QCBPA that the state has turned 
thumbs down on a plan to keep 
Hancock St. open during 
construction by taking three 
additional stores on the east side. 

Those stores were Standard TV, 
Book Haven and Colpitts Travel. 

Mayor Tobin said a plan is 
being devised to keep Hancock St. 
open during the construction 
period by deroll^ ; " ,, traffic to the 



west of Hancock St. He declined to 
give the exact route. 

"Some of these plans are being 
put together as we go along," he 
said. "They change from day-to- 
day as we try to meet our 
objectives. 

"We are trying not to jeopardize 
business in downtown Quincy. We 
are trying to keep Hancock St. 
open. But still we have to satisfy 
the federal and state agencies who 



are putting up the money." 

"The East-West Connector was 
not proposed because Tobin wants 
it," the mayor continued, "It will 
not be opposed just because the 
QCBPA doesn't want it. 

"The only decision is whether it 
is good for Quincy to move the city 
into the year 2000. That is the 
issue. If it's not in the best interest 
of the city then it shouldn't be 
built." 



p No Trespassing' Ordinance For Quarries 



The City Council Tuesday night 
passed an ordinance creatinga "No 
Trespassing" zone around 
Swingle's Quarry in West Quincy 
and backed it up with fines ranging 



up to $200. 
The ordinance. 



filed by 



Councillor James A. Sheets, is 
aimed at the revelers and vandals 



who are making life miserable for 
residents who live around the 
quarry. 

Sheets called it "a war zone on a 
warm weekend." 



CALL ME BEFORE 
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518 Hancock Street, Quincy. 472-1224 
LIFE - BUSINESS - PERSONAL ■ AUTO 






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Boosts Business 

Sidewalk Bazaar 
Best In History 



The 1981 Downtown Quincy 
Sidewalk Bazaar may have been 
the best in the 12-year history of 
the event. 

"It was the best ever, as far as I'm 
concerned," said Burt Cook of 
Tag's. There were more people 
around the square than I ever saw 
before." 

"It shows that if we get a lot of 
people involved we can still draw a 
tremendous crowd to Quincy," 
said Mark Bertrman of Rogers 
Jewelry. 

"This was the best one yet," said 
Charles Ryder of Ryder's. 

Virtually all the merchant 
members of the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association who were queried in a 
Quincy Sun poll said that business 
was up noticably during the three- 
day sidewalk sale. 

Jack Doyle of South Shore 
Buick, taking part in the bazaarfor 
the first time, said his firm sold two 
cars off the street and recorded the 
names of some future possibilities. 

"We might do it differently next 
year," he said. "We'll have a larger 
display." 

Jack London of Quincy 

' Funiture said his business was up 

at least 80 per cent over last year's 

bazaar. 

"We oversold our advertised 
items for the first time," he said. 
"We have no stock in those items 



left." 

Mark Bertman said his business 
was up some 40 per cent over last 
year. 

"We are well cleaned out of what 
we wanted to clean out," he said. 

Ryder said his business was up 
40 per cent Thursday, down 
slightly on Friday, and up 20 per 
cent Saturday. 

"I think it's tradition more than 
anything else," he said. "It's the 
best sidewalk sale around and 
people are starting to look forward 
to it. It's fun, like a small town 
block party." 

Sumner Cohen said bazaar days 
business was substantially ahead 
of last year at Kincaide's. 

"It was up about 20 per cent," he 
said. "I can't say what the reasons 
were but there seemed to be more 
people from Boston on Hancock 
St. than in previous years." 

Jerry Nicholas of Beacon 
Fabrics estimated that business 
was up by about a third over last 
year. Gary Liebert of Hart's 
Jewelry figured his business was up 
about 10 per cent, thanks to a big 
Thursday. 

"The weather was in our favor," 
said Marion Feldman of Jason's, 
"and we had some good buys. 
That's a good combination." 

The annual three-day event is 
sponsored by the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association. 



Helen Gurich's 

BEAUTY GARDENS 

1436 Hancock St., Quincy 

Wishes To Announce 

NEW HOURS T* m 

For Your Convenience 

472-9117 
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Mon. thru Fri. 8a.ttl.-10p.m. 



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Vests, Skirts, Tank Tops and More!! 

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Open 9:30 to 6 Thur. & Fri. tii 9 



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Thursday, July 23, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 3 

t 




THE SIDEWALK BAZAAR, sponsored by the Quincy Center Business and Professional Association, 
brought thousands of people to downtown Quincy in search of bargains and fun last week. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dave Gillooly) 

Kelly Leading Candidate 
For Hospital Purchasing Job 



The City Council was expected 
Tuesday night to create the 
position of Director of Materials 
Management at City Hospital and 
City Purchasing Agent William J. 
Kelly appeared to have the inside 
track on the $25,000 a year job. 

Harold W. Coose, assistant 
director for personnel, said a field 
of 37 applicants for the post was 
narrowed to five and Jack 
Thompson, head of materials 
management for Hospital Corp. of 
America did the final interviews. 

Mayor Arthur H. Tobin said 
Kelly had asked him if it was all 
right for him to apply for thejob 
and "I gave him the highest 



recommendation." 

"The hospital was very 
impressed with him," said Tobin. 
"They were not only impressed 
with his background but with his 
sincere knowledge of how 
municipal bids and contracts are 
handled." 

Tobin said the job is being 
created so that the Hospital, which 
recently achieved fiscal 
independence from the city 
budget, can do its own purchasing. 

"This will mean less work for the 



city purchasing department, too," 
he said. 

Kelly, a retired lieutenant 
colonel in the Army who lives at 98 
South Central Ave., Wollaston, 
was named purchasing agent for 
the city by Tobin in 1979. 

He is a graduate of Bridgewater 
State, Central Missouri State and 
the U.S. Army Command and 
General Staff College in Fort 
Leavenworth, Kan. 

He and his wife, Stella, have one 
daughter, Mrs. Denise Moss of 
Cape Elizabeth, Maine. 




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In and Out-of-Warranty Watches Repaired 
Genuine TIMEX Energy Cells available 

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Weymouth 337-8450 

196 Washington Street 
Quincy 479-4400 

Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 8:30 to 5 

Other Shops also in Marshlield, Holbrook, 

Norwood, Hyde Park, Watertown 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 23, 19*1 



1 



•^Hv 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

15c Per Copy - $7.00 Per Year - Out of State $10.00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

POSTMASTER: Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St. 

Quincy, Mass. 02169 

Member New England Press Association 



•;■, 



The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for ^«"_S'' 

typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that &UQA 

part of an advertisement in which the typographical error ^|^-«j«v 

occurs. ■-■■?' 




uincy 




uiz 



Four winners in the Quincy Quiz this week. 

Lorraine A. Murphy of 158 Darrow St., Houghs Neck, and 
Gerald S. Gherardi of 1 15 Piermont St., Wollaston, win T-shirts 
and Donna Uvanitte of 10 Beebe Rd., Germantown, and Joseph 
A. Condon, of 77 Brimfield St., Wollaston, win bumper stickers. 

Each week two Quincy Sun T-shirts and two Quincy Sun 
bumper stickers are offered as prizes in the Quincy Quiz. 

The first two readers (one a mail subscriber) to submit to the 
Sun office in writing the correct answers to the week's five 
questions receive T-shirts. The next two receive bumper stickers. 

This week's Quincy Quiz: 

1. What is the name of the newest member of the Quincy 
Housing Authority's Board of Commissioners? 

2. True or false: Quincy is one of the 10 largest cities in 
Massachusetts, according to the 1980 U.S. census. 

3. In what section of the city is Crabtree Rd.? 

4. Two members of the current City Council have served terms 
as elected members of the School Committee. Name them. 

5. Francis X. Finn has been chief of the Quincy Police 
Department since: 1966? 1971? 1976? 

Answers to last week's Quincy Quiz: 

1. Peter Chrisom is the principal of North Quincy High School. 

2. The Bargain Center is located at 2 Washington St. 

3. The Quincy Youth Hockey Arena is located in the 
Merrymount section of the city. 

4. False. Contestants in the Miss Quincy Bay Pageant are not 
limited to girls from Quincy only. 

5. City Hall was built in 1844. 



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Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Baron Still In The Mood 




HUGO 

danced on the' 



Baron Hugo had them literally dancing in the 
street during last week's Sidewalk Bazaar 

For a couple of hours 
before playing for the Miss 
Quincy Bay Pageant, Baron's 
combo had a big crowd ringed 
around them at Hancock and 
Granite Sts., enjoying every 
note of such old goodies as 
"Moonlight Serenade" and 
"In The Mood," while some 
blacktop. 

It was a fun night. But then, wherever Baron 
goes it's a fun night or day. 

At 77, he still rolls along with pretty much the 
same pep he had in the good old days when he led 
the house band at the Totem Pole back in the 
I940's. 

He was right up there during the big band era. 
In fact, at onetime he had one of the biggest big 
bands of all— 35 pieces. Some people think 
Lawrence Welk patterned the size of his band 
after Baron's. 

Baron was born Hugo Lira in a house at 22 
Parker St., Quincy Center and grew up here. He 
has lived in Milton since 1934. Baron and his 
wife, the former Edith Hamilton of Avon, were 
married 50 years when she died January, 1 980. 
He hasn't gotten over that blow. 

This year Baron set up three scholarships for 
Milton High School graduates. One, a memorial 
secretarial scholarship in Edith's name. She was 
a secretary. The other two scholarships are for 
music and art and are in his name. They are 
perpetual scholarships. He is planning to 
establish similar scholarships at Quincy High 
School which he attended. 

One of Baron's famed numbers at the Totem 
Pole was "I've Got A Lovely Bunch of Coconuts" 
which he sang the other night here. A singer by 
the name of Merv Griffin did that one, too. And 
when he heard it was a big hit in Boston he 
thought it was his record. But it was Baron's 
version that Boston went for. 

Baron's all-time favorite number is Glenn 
Miller's "In The Mood." He signs off with that at 
dances. After playing a soft, goodnight medley, 
he swings into "In The'Mood"to "Wake them up 
for 'the ride home." 

His favorite band: Glenn Miller. "The greatest 
sound of them all." Favorite romantic song: 
"And I Love Her So." ("I used to sing that to 
Edith.") Favorite male vocalists: "A toss-up 
between Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra." 
Favorite female vocalist: Helen O'Connell. 

Will the big bands come back as we knew 
them? 

"I don't know," shrugs Baron. "But, you 
know, every 25 years or so we've had a new 
radical sound. There was John Phillips Sousa 
and the military band sound. Then Paul 




Whiteman who added strings. Then came Rudy 
Vallee crooning through a megaphone. Then 
Benny Goodman gave us swing and brought in 
the big band era. Then Elvis Presley, the Beatles 
and rock 'n roll." 
What will the new radical sound be? 
"Maybe," smiles Baron, "we're ready for the 
big band sound again." 
And did somebody say, "I hope so.?" 

D 
AT THE Sidewalk Bazaar, Mayor Arthur 
Tobin took the Pepsi taste 
test. Too bad Pepsi didn't 
have a TV camera recording 
it. Tobin not only thought 
the Pepsi tasted best but he 
■M^T^^ could even tell which was the 
Wk %m? Pepsi and which was the 
TOBIN Coke. And then he did it a 

second time. A wag looking on wanted to know 
if he knew which one was the Democrat and 
which one the Republican. 

D 

FORMER Gov. Michael Dukakis will be in 
Quincy Saturday campaigning for a return to the 
State House. He and his 
Quincy committee members 
will be hosts at a reception at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel Buckley, 75 Rawson 
Rd., Wollaston, from 3 to 5 
p.m. Anyone wishing to 
attend is asked to call Bernice 
Mader. 773-688 1. DUKAKIS 

D 
SOMETIMES, says Rep. Michael Morrissey, 
it's not what you say as much as where you say it 
that can get you in trouble. 

Morrissey celebrated the end of the long State 
House budget wrangle with a two-day vacation 
in which he sailed a friend's boat down to Cape 
Cod. 

He paused in Scituate to use the dockside 
phone to call another friend in 
the media with some 
requested comment on the 
controversial state budget. 

He was, Morrissey told the 

friend, going to ask Gov. King 

to veto the section of the 

MORRISSEY budget which relieves 22 

towns of financial responsibility for the MBTA 

deficit. 

The remark touched off an uproar among 
Scituate townies who were lounging on the dock 
near the phone. 

"I forgot where I was," said Morrissey 
ruefully. "Scituate is one of the 22 towns. I 
thought they were going to throw me into the 
harbor." 

Morrissey survived the paux pas unscathed. 





REMEMBER Will? 




... the Quincy Trust Co. office 
was located at the corner of 
Hancock St. and Cottage Ave. 

...Vou were not just a Policy 
Number and Retained your 
own identity, when personal 
service was always given... It 
still is at. 



BURGIN 

PLATNER 

INS. 



1357 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY 472-3000 



Ihurtdav, July 2.1, I9SI Quuwy Sun P«|« i 



Paul Dunphy Has 4.0 Average 

QJC Top Honor Student, 45, 
Plans Further Education 



The top honor student at 
Quincy Junior College with a 4.0 
cumulative average is Paul V. 
Dunphy Jr., 45, of 56 French St., 
Norfolk Downs, who hadn't seen 
the inside of a classroom in 25 
years. 

Dunphy, who received a degree 
in history at the recent QJC 
commencement, attended school 
full time and also worked fulltime 
at a night job as network 
supervisor for the New England 
Telephone Co. 

"I didn't have the opportunity 
to go on after high school but I 
always wanted to go back to 
school," he said. "When I 
transferred to night supervisor 
there was my chance." 

Now Dunphy, who is married 
and has five children, plans to 
enter UMass- Boston in the fall as 
a junior, along with one of his 
daughters, who is in the same 
class. 

He will be attending UMass 
with a $1,500 scholarship given 
each year by the Quincy Coopera- 
tive Bank to an outstanding QJC 
graduate who is going on to 
further education. 

Dunphy, who joined the 
telephone compnay 27 years ago 
after he got out of high school, 
had sonic trepidation about going 




PAUL DUNPHY (right), top honor student at Quincy Junior College at 
the age of 45, accepts Quincy Cooperative Bank scholarship from bank 
vice president Frank Mitchell. 



back to school after a quarter of a 
ccnturv away from the books. 

"1 really feared getting back 
into studying." he said. "But 
those fears were really 
unfounded. Fveryone at Quincy 



Junior was so helpful. I met some 
marvelous people and not just the 
older students, the kids, too." 

Dunphy ard his wife, 
Elizabeth, have three children in 
college, one in high school and 
one in elementary school. 



Brownell Bats . 500 On King Vetoes 



Rep. Thomas F. Brownell was 
batting .500 today after Gov. 
Edward J. King vetoed that 
section of the state budget which 
would have allowed 23 towns to 
withdraw from the MBTA. 

Brownell had urged a King veto 
of the proposal and also the part 
of the budget dealing with the 
distribution of local aid. 

"These sections severely 
impact the City of Quincy," said 
Brownell. "The proposed lottery 
formula for distribution of local 
aid is a neglect of responsibility 



under Proposition 2V4. Quincy 
will get 23 per cent of its losses 
back, while other communities 
recoup better than 100 per cent. ' ' 
"I voted against the budget. 
The very reason for increased 
local aid is to address the impact 



of Proposition 2'/2, not to unduly 
benefit richer communities. 

"I have strongly recommended 
equitable relief based on a 
community's loss under Propo- 
sition 2 Vj." 



Flexibility Clinic At YMCA 



The South Shore YMCA will 
conduct a four-week flexibility 
clinic starting Wednesday, July 
22, at 7 p.m., to teach people how 
to stretch out. 



The clinic is open to the public 
and requires a fee. 

Registration must be made at 
the front desk of the "Y". 



Presidential 

Cooperative Bank 

Continues To 
Pay The ■••• 

-Interest 

Rates Allowed 

By Law — 

On 6 Month Money 
Market Accounts 




Minimum Deposit $10,000 

Interest Paid Monthly 
All Accounts Insured In Full 




Op«n Saturdays 
9 ML to 1 ML 



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QUINCY 



The Bank On The Corner 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN 
THE HEART OF QUINCY SQUARE 

773-2040 773-2041 




Quincy 's 
Yesterdays 

By Tom Henshaw 




July 23-29, 

1958 

23 Years Ago 
This Week 



Council Indicates 
Support For Project 
West Of RR Tracks 

Six members of the City Council indicated they would support a 
proposal to create a new commercial and retail development 
across the railroad tracks from the Ross parking area. 

Councillors Edna B. Austin, Thomas 
S. Burgin, David S. Mcintosh, and John 
J. Quinn voted for it at an informal 
conference while Carl W. Anderson and 
William C. Ellis were not present but 
recorded in favor. 

Absent without commitment were 
James R. Mclntyre and Charles L. Shea 
while Joseph E. Brett said he was reserving his decision. 

On the strength of it, Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa prepared to 
ask permission from the State Emergency Finance Board to 
borrow $800,000 for the project plus off-street parking in Norfolk 
Downs. 

LARGEST FIELD 
Frank J. D'Agostino of Dedham withdrew as a candidate for 
the Democratic nomination for Congress in the 13th District but 
the remaining field — three Republicans and nine Democrats — 
was the largest in years. 

Seeking the Republican nomination to succeed Richard B. 
Wigglesworth of Milton, who was retiring after 30 years, were 
William W. Jenness of Quincy, Hjalmar Peterson of Brockton 
and Harold Putnam of Needham. 

The Democrats were Francis H. Foy and David J. Crowley of 
Quincy, Edward J. Dwyer and Michael DeSimone of Boston, 
Richard E. McCormack of Braintree, William A. Connell Jr. of 
Weymouth, and Hollis M. Mosher, James A. Burke and Peter G. 
Fallon of Milton. 

QUINCY GIRLS WIN 
The Quincy junior girls tennis team lost only two out of 15 
games in sweeping to a 7-0 victory over Framingham at the 
Quincy Tennis Club. 

' Susan Kopman, Marilyn Dixon, Arlene Rubin, Nancy 
Chaddock and Sandra Zacchini won their single matches easily 
and the pairings of Kopman-Dixon and Chaddock Zacchini 
prevailed in the doubles. 

ANSELMO LOSES OUT 
Frank Anselmo, superintendent of the Quincy Post Office, 
apparently was out of the running for Postmaster of Boston when 
his name was omitted from the list of the top three eligibles 
certified by Civil Service. 

CITATION TO GEORGE 
Mayor Delia Chiesa nominated Louis C. George, Lebanese- 
born former city councillor, for the good citizenship citation 
awarded annually by Freedom, Inc., to a Quincy citizen of foreign 
birth. 

QUINCY-ISMS 
Gov. Foster Furcolo was expectedto sign a bill that would set 
up a special seven-member board to manage Mount Wollaston 
Cemetery . . . Joseph A. MacRitchie, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph A. MacRitchie, 246 Bellevue Rd., Squantum, was 
appearing on WHDH-TV's popular children's program "Romper 
Room" . . . William Holden and Alec McGuinness were starring in 
the Academy Award-winning picture "The Bridge On the River 
Kwai,"at the Strand . . . Joseph V. Marrocco, 250 Newbury Ave., 
Atlantic, was named to the dean's list for the April-June term at 
Northeastern . . .Gus Andrews pitched a one-hitter for his fifth 
straight win as the Wollaston Merchants walloped Sears, 12-4, in 
Quincy Pony League play . . . Larry Scarnici, 125 Quincy St., 
South Quincy, venerable of the Sons of Italy, was named 
chairman of Quincy's Columbus Day program . . . The Koch Club 
of North Quincy held its 10th annual family outing at Faxon Park 
. . . Richard Cardinal Cushinglaid the cornerstone of St. Boniface 
Church, Germantown, two years after the parish was established . 
. . The Monday special at Sherry's, 579 Southern Artery, was 
sauteed chicken livers on toast with potato, vegetable and coffee 
for 95 cents . . . Group health insurance rates for city employees 
were scheduled to go up Oct. 1 to $4.60 a month for individuals and 
$13.60 a month for family units . . . Joseph Halter, 181 
Independence Ave., South Quincy, was preparing to leave for the 
national convention of the Loyal Order of the Moose in 
Mooseheart, 111. . . . Mayor Delia Chiesa said off street parking 
will return a $400,000 profit to the city this year . . . Richard H. 
Boland, 91 Winthrop St., Houghs Neck, was promoted to mayor 

at the 13th Airborne Corps Headquarters at Fort Bragg, N.C 

Hamburger was three pounds for $ I at Lodgens, 32 Cottage Ave. . 
. . Atty. Dace J. Moore of Quincy withdrew as a candidate for 
state senator from the First Norfolk District . . . William A. 
O'Connell, executive vice president of the Quincy-South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce, advanced a six-point plan for downtown 
Quincy to counteract the proposed South Shore Plaza in 
Braintree . . . The General Services Administration advised the 
city it would be ready to negotiate the sale to Quincy of 1 1.6acres 
of land in Broad Meadows sometime in August . 



Pace 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 23, 19SI 





ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. John Durkin of Quincy 
announce the engagement of their daughter, Adelaide, to 
John Grandfield, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Grandfield 
of Weymouth. Miss Durkin, a graduate of Fontbonne 
Academy, is employed by the Boston Financial Data 
Services. Mr. Grandfield, a graduate of Weymouth North 
High School and Suffolk University, is employed by 
New England Merchants National Bank. A winter, 1982 
wedding is planned. 

[Miller Studio] 

Judith Lutts At 
Ohio Girls Scout Program 

Judith Lutts of 141 Presidents nationally promoted Girl Scout 



ENGAGED -- Mr. and Mrs. Richard Horton of 84 Russell 
St., North Quincy, announce the engagement of their 
daughter, Marielana Walden, to Richard Cunio, son of 
Mrs. Joseph Cunio of 723 East Third St., South Boston, 
and the late Mr. Cunio. Miss Walden, a graduate of North 
Quincy High School and Regis College, Weston, is 
employed as a teacher in North Conway, N.H. Mr. 
Cunio, a graduate of Boston Technical School and Mass 
Maritime Academy, is employed by Texaco Marine 
Department. An Aug. 22, wedding is planned. 

[Mclntire's Studio] 



ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rota of Milton 
announce the engagement of their daughter, Linda, to 
John J. Barron, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Barron of 
Quincy. Miss Rota, a graduate of Milton High School 
and Chamberlayne Junior College, is employed by 
Patriot Insurance Agency. Mr. Barron attended 
Archbishop Williams High School, Northeastern 
University and Babson Graduate School of Business 
Administration. He is employed by Congressman Brian 
Donnelly and Quincy Junior College. An October 
wedding is planned. 



Lane, Quincy, a Girl Scout in the 
Patriots' Trail Council, is in Ohio 
attending "Try It Now", a 



Save Gas and Money . 
. . . Shop Locally 



"Wider Opportunity" program. 

For 12 days until July 30, she 
and 75 other Girl Scouts from 29 
states and four Girl Guides from 
Zambia and Switzerland wjll 
participate in camping, sports, 
field trips, eco-action and cultural 
exchange. 



Fitzgerald 9 

Dresses of Distinction 



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See 
Our 
Summer 
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Dresses 

and 

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Sportswear 




ow Open 

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at. 



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At The Granary 

14 North Street 

Hingham, MA 

7492242 



Houghs Neck 
Bus Trip 
Thursday 



The Houghs Neck Community 
Center will conduct a bus trip to 
the Hilltop Steakhouse in Saugus 
today (Thursday) leaving the 
Center at 10 a.m. and returning at 
2 p.m. 

The trip is open to anyone from 
9 to 90 with a fee for the bus plus 
the cost of the meal. 

To sign up, call Pat Ridlen at 
471-8251. 



Births 



July IS 

Mr. and Mrs. James Scully, 
(Lynne Cogswell), 54 Carver Rd., 
Plymouth, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Darcy 
(Eleanor Tormey), 35 Walnut 
Ave., Weymouth, a son. 
July 16 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Roaen 
(Deborah Walker), 53 Springvale 
Cir., Weymouth, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morgan 
Fitzpatrick (Anne McDonough), 
49 Newcomb St., Quincy, a 



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Mr. and Mrs. David Kenney 
(Christina Shea), 535 Washington 
St., Quincy, a son. 
July 17 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Landi 
(Patricia Kinsella), 405 Belmont 
St., Wollaston, a daughter. 

Bhupendrakumar and Bharti 
Patel, 373 Sea St., Quincy, a 
daughter. 

July 18 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lewis 
(Joyce Ferullo), 151 Bittersweet 
Lane, Randolph, a son. 

July 19 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Peros 
(Vaso Bellas), D19 Lydon Lane, 
Halifax, a daughter. 



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Hiursday, "uly 23, I9SI Quincy Sun Page 7 





MR. and MRS. BRUCE E. WHITAKER 

[Mclntire's Studio] 

Shirley J. Whittemore Wed 
To Bruce E. Whitaker 



Shirley J. Whittemore and 
Bruce E. Whitaker were married 
recently during a double ring 
ceremony at St. Chrysostom's 
Church, Wollaston. 

The ceremony was performed 
by Rev. William Underhill and 
Rev. Lewis Mills. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip S. 
Whittemore, Jr., of Wollaston. A 
graduate of North Quincy High 
School, she was also graduated 
from New England Baptist 
Hospital School of Nursing and 
Pine Manon College with a 
diploma of nursing and A.D. of 
nursing. She is a registered nurse 
in the maternity section of 
Memorial Hospital, North 
Conway, N.H. 

The bridegroom, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward L. Whitaker of 



Fryeburg, Me., is a graduate of 
Fryeburg Academy. He is a meat 
cutter at Grant's Supermarket, 
Glen, N.H. 

Maid of honor was Sandra M. 
Whittemore of Quincy. Brides- 
maids were Annette Madden of 
Wollaston; Cyndi Broyer of 
Fryeburg, Me.; and Janet Carter 
of Natick. 

Janice Wooldridge of Wollas- 
ton was acolyte. 

Robert Barber of Bangor, Me., 
was best man. Ushers were 
Steven Whittemore of Wollaston; 
Scott Whitaker and Chris 
Whitaker, both of Fryeburg, Me. 

A reception was held at 
Furnace Brook Golf Club. 

Following a wedding trip to 
Sarasota, Fla., the newlyweds are 
making their home in Fryeburg, 
Me. 



Dorothy Mullaney Receives Nursing Degree 



Dorothy M. Mullaney, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James 
E. Mullaney of 86 Sims Rd., 
Wollaston, has been awarded a 
degree cum laude in nursing at 
the 88th annual commencement 
of St. Anselm College, Man- 
chester, N.H. 

She was a member of the 
Student Nurse's Association, Big 
Brothers - Big Sisters Organiza- 
tion, and was elected to the local 
honor society for nursing. She 
took part in intramural soccer, 
basketball and volleyball. 

Mullaney plans a career in 

Donna Ferguson 
llpsala Graduate 

Donna L. Ferguson of 118 
Cranch St., Quincy, was 
graduated cum laude at recent 
commencement exercises held at 
Upsala College, East Orange, 
N.J. 

Miss Ferguson, daughter of 
Christine and Donald Ferguson, 
was awarded a degree in 
psychology. She is a graduate of 
Boston Latin Academy of 
Dorchester, Mass. 



nursing at New England Medical 
Center. 



ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert A. Smith of Squantum 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Paula, to Donald 
Carlson, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Carlson of Savin Hill. 
Miss Smith, a graduate of North 
Quincy High School and Boston 
State College, is a registered 
nurse employed with Med-Staff 
nursing agency. Mr. Carlson, a 
graduate of South Boston High 
School, is employed at Gerard 
Freezer of Boston. A Sept. 12, 
wedding is planned. 



Social 



St. Ann's School 
To Mark 

25th Anniversary 

A dinner dance in celebration of 
the 25th anniversary of St. Ann's 
School, Wollaston, will be held 
Saturday, Sept. 12, at the Bryan 
VFW Post, Broad St., Quincy. 

The celebration will cover the 
class years of 1959 to 1971. 

Anyone interested in attending 
should notify Helen M. Flanders, 
25 Bridge St., Quincy, 472-4543. or 
Sallee Spencer Emond, 17 
Vermont Ave., Brockton, 583- 
4583. 



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MR. and MRS. CHRISTOPHER J. CORDEIRO 

[Paul's Images] 

Nancy Mac Kay Bride 
Of Christopher J. Cordeiro 



Nancy C. MacKay and 
Christopher J. Cordeiro were 
married recently at St. Ann's 
Church, Wollaston, during a 
wedding ceremony performed by 
Fr. Alban Carroll, uncle of the 
bride. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred C. MacKay 
of 26 Dunbarton Rd., Wollaston. 
A graduate of North Quincy High 
School, she is employed by 
Kemper Group, North Quincy. 

The bridegroom, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Daniel Cordeiro of 69 
Pagoda Circle, Milton, is a 
graduate of North Quincy High 
School and Quincy Junior 
College. He attends Bentley 
College and is an accountant with 
Digital Equipment, Maynard. 



Maid of honor was Maureen A. 
MacKay of Wollaston. Brides- 
maids were Kathleen T. MacKay, 
Loraine L. MacKay and Gail A. 
Lombard, all of Wollaston; Mrs. 
Patricia A. MacKay of Virginia; 
and Lisa B. Cordeiro of Milton. 

Best man was Stephen J. 
Cordeiro of Natick. Ushers were 
Michael D. Sardano and Michael 
J. O'Malley, both of Wollaston; 
Robert J. Cordeiro and Brian P. 
Cordeiro, both of Milton; and Lt. 
Stephen J. MacKay of Virginia. 

A reception was held at Florian 
Hall, Dorchester. 

Following a wedding trip to the 
White Mountains, New Hamp- 
shire, the newlyweds are making 
their home in Wollaston. 



LOVE IS 



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Speak to Terry Stracco - She's our rental agent - 
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and all other occasions. The Golden Lion Suite 
accommodates up to 300. The Venetian Room up 
to ISO guests. Give Terry a call for an appointment 
for your reservation. New brochures are available, 
(air conditioned) 

CALL Quincy Sons of Italy Social Center 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy, MA 02169 

NEW NUMBER is 472-5900 






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Page I Quincy Sun Thursday, July 23, Ittl 



Beth Strenge Pageant Winner 

New Miss Quincy Bay f Qld Fashioned' 



By TOM HENSHAW 

For the past two years, Beth 
Strenge has been accepted as a 
candidate for Miss Massachu- 
setts honors. 

"But I chickened out," she 
said. "They wanted a 
sponsorship fee and I felt 
uncomfortable asking people to 
sponsor me. But I'd feel more 
comfortable now. 1 can say I'm 
Miss Quincy Bay." 

Miss Strenge (pronounced 
"stren-guee," with a hard "g"), 
an Eastern Nazarene College 
student from Upper Darby, 
Pa., won the coveted title 
Friday night from a field of 28 
other South Shore beauties. 

The tall, pretty blond, 21- 
year-old college senior will 
reign over Quincy Bay Race 
Week Aug. 12-16 and take 
home most of the $4,000 in 
prizes that are offered in the 
beauty pageant. 

It was close to being the 
biggest thrill in her young life — 
close, but not quite. 

"Four years ago," she said, 
"my choir in Upper Darby High 
School represented the United 
States on a tour of Russia and 
Poland. We went as ambas- 
sadors of good will. 

"It was fun. We had a big 
map of the United States 
behind us and we sang the songs 
of the different areas of the 
country, the cowboy songs, the 
Broadway hits and songs like 
that. 

"But I learned that you really 
miss the states when you're 
away. It was so nice to come 
home. It takes something like 
that to make you realize that 
this is the place to live." 

The pageant, co-sponsored 
by the Quincy Center Business 
and Professional Association 
and the Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association, drew a crowd 
estimated by police at more 
than 4,000. It was held on a 
portable boardwalk in front of 
the Hanock Bank on Hancock 
St. 

Runnersup to Miss Strenge 
were Annette P. Nielsen, 20, of 
Quincy; Jean L. Zdankowski, 
19, of Quincy; Jill M. Bodell, 
23, of Weymouth; and Dawna 
A. Stitt, 17, of Scituate. 

Judges were Avi Nelson, 
radio talk show host; Ron 
Zooleck, executive director of 
the South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce; Bernie Reisberg, 
president of the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association; Robert Hutcheon, 
president of the Quincy Bay 
Race Week Association; and 
Nancy Meyers, Miss Quincy 




BEAUTIES THREE - Nancy Meyers (left), Miss Quincy Bay of 1979, 
leaves the judge's row to pose with Beth Strenge (center), Miss Quincy 
Bay of 1981, and first runnerup, Annette Nielsen. 



Bay of 1979. 

Pat Jones, assistant to the 
president of the Home Town 
Bank, Newton, was pageant 
chairman; Tom Kennedy, 
WHDH radio personality, was 
master of ceremonies. Baron 
Hugo's Orchestra played for 
the pageant. 

Miss Strenge is entering her 
senior year at Eastern Nazarene 
in September, working toward 
a degree in communications 
and psychology. She hopes to 
go on to Emerson College for a 
masters in mass communica- 
tion. 

"I'd like to get into public 
relations or broadcasting," she 
said. While going to college, she 
works at the Hurley Insurance 
Agency. 

At Eastern Nazarene, she is 
vice president of her class, 
social chairwoman of the 
women's society, and a 
resident assistant in charge of a 
dormitory floor of girls. 

She is the oldest of four 



children. Brother David, 20, 
and sister Jackie, 18, also are 
students at ENC. Sister Chris, 
16, is in high school back home 
in Upper Darby. 

Miss Strenge has no 
immediate marriage plans, 
although she has a steady 
fellow, Robert Gough, another 
Pennsylvania expatriate who 
works as a child care counsellor 
at the Lee School in Boston 
while attending Suffolk 
University. 

"A career is important for a 
woman," she said, "but I still 
take the Biblical view that the 
man is the head of the 
household and the family 
comes first. 

"I'm not a big feminist. In 
fact, I'm quite conservative on 
that subject. But I'll stick up for 
my rights. 

"I'm old fashioned. I'm not a 
door-opener. I still enjoy 
having the guy pay for my 
dinner." 





ANNETTE NIELSEN, 20, of Quincy cuts a curvaceous figure in the 
swimsuit competition phase of the Miss Quincy Bay Pageant. She was 
first runnerup. 




MISS QUINCY BAY, 1981, Beth Strenge, is crowned by Miss Quincy 
Bay, 1980, Tracy Hart, while other finalists look on. 




BARON HUGO, the noted band leader, croons for the five finalists in the Miss Quincy Bay 
pageant. Left to right, Jean Zdankowski, 19, of North Quincy; Beth Strenge, 21, of 
Wollaston; Dawna Stitt, 17, of Scituate; Jill Bodell, 23, of South Weymouth; and Annette 
Nielsen, 20, of Quincy. 



CONTESTANT CYNTHIA A. WOOMER, 20, of Brockton walks past judges in the Miss 
Quincy Bay beauty pageant. Seated, from left, are Avi Nelson, radio talk show host; Robert 
Hutcheon, president of the Quincy Bay Race Week Association; Bernie Reisberg, president 
of the Quincy Center Business and Professional Association; Ron Zooleck, executive 
director of the South Shore Chamber of Commerce; and Nancy Meyers, Miss Quincy Bay of 
1979. 



Quincy Sun Photos by Rick Matthews 



Thursday, July 23, I Ml Qulncy Sun Page 9 



William O'Hare Candidate 
For Council At-Large 



Pledging to continue the 
economic rebirth of Quincy, Arty. 
William J. O'Hare of 59 Hamden 
Circle, Wollaston, announced his 
candidacy for one of the three 
at-large seats on the City Council. 

"Restructuring the economic 
base of Quincy Square and 
attracting new business to Quincy 
will become, I believe, an 
economic necessity for the city," 
he said in his announcement at 
Morrisette Post. 

"My education and experience 
makes me qualified to help in 
these areas. 

"A partnership of ideas must 
be established with respect to 
economic growth and the mainte- 
nance of strong neighborhoods 
because this will become the chief 



issue to be faced by all elected 
city officials in the 1980s." 

O'Hare, 27, is a lifelong 
resident of Quincy and is the son 
of Fire Capt. and Mrs. Francis X. 
O'Hare. He is a law partner in the 
Boston firm of Carrigan and 
O'Hare. 

"As a product of Quincy's 
neighborhoods, playgrounds and 
schools, I have observed 
personally the programs and 
services all Quincy citizens have 
available to them," he said. 

"I am commited to maintaining 
these community services. 

"Proposition 2'/j has shown 
that every citizen must help the 
burden of tax reform. I pledge 
that this burden shall be fairly 
and equitably shared by all the 
competing interests within the 



Toland Urges Residents 
Attend Connector Hearing 



she said. 

"A major change in the face of 
Quincy Square deserves the full 
attention and consideration of all 
our citizens because of its 
ramifications. 

"Whatever the final decision, it 
will impact heavily on the growth 
and economy, progress and 
prosperity of Quincy through the 
end of this century. ' ' 



Patricia M. Toland, a candidate 
for the City Council at large, has 
urged Quincy residents to attend 
tonight's public hearing on the 
proposed East- West connector. 

"Whether or not the East- West 
Connector becomes a reality 
depends in large measure on 
what state officials hear from 
those who speak at the hearing, 

John Dolbec Gets Colby Degree 

John V. Dolbec, son of Mr. and Colby College in Waterville, Me. 

Mrs. Robert P. Dolbec of Quincy, He is a graduate of North Quincy 

received a degree in biology at the High School. 
106th commencement exercises of 



Mr. Anthony's 
Barber Shop 



• Senior Citizens' Haircuts 
$2.75 - Mole and Female 

• Children under 2 years • $3.00 
•All Others -$3.75 



Shaves $2.00 

Shampoos $2.00 

Hair coloring and Shampoo $5.00 



* Housecalls also made for Invalids 



393 Water Street 

Brewer's Corner 
West Quincy 



4719497 



THE 
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city. 

"As an attorney who practices 
law in the Quincy District Court, I 
have seen the reduction of 
community services, particularly 
in the area of public safety. 

"It is very difficult to put a 
price on the health and safety of 
the citizens of Quincy but, I 
believe, that money spent 
judiciously in these areas is 
money well spent." 

O'Hare is a graduate of St. 
Ann's School, North Quincy High 
School, Middlebury College with 
a degree in economics, and 
Suffolk Law School. He is a 
member of the Massachusetts, 
Norfolk and Boston Bars. 



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Pa(e 10 Quincy Sun Thursday. July 23. 1981 

Leslie Salvaggio On Dean's Li si 

Leslie Salvaggio, daughter oi for the spring semester at Westfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Salvaggio State College, 
of 33 Wesson Ave.. West Quincy. Miss Salvaggio. a sophomore, is 

has horn n;- ii'd lo the dean's list majoring inelementan «M ,: <• 



Due to the 
untimely closing 

of The Woman's Exchange, 

The New Twist is offering 

to it's consignors — a place 

to sell their products. 




Contact Bette or Jaci at 

The New Twist 

44 North St., Hingham 749-3440 



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Strong Financial Background 
Needed, McCauley Says 



The continuing decline in 
Quincy's credit rating makes it 
imperative that whoever is mayor 
in the 1980s have a strong, 
financial background, says City 
Councillor Francis X. McCauley, 
a banker who is running for 
mayor. 

Moody's Rating Service 
recently dropped the city's rating 
three grades from A to BA, and 
McCauley pointed out that 
Moody's gave the following 
reasons for the downward 
adjustment: 

• "A significant weakening of 
financial operations over the past 
three years." 

• "The failure to balance 
budgets in the past, when 
circumstances were less diffi- 
cult." 

• "A stagnant tax base coupled 
with population decreases." 

McCauley noted that during 
the past four years as a councillor 
he has spoken out on a number of 
occasions to question financial 
operations in the city. 

He said he has continuously 
criticized the overestimation of 
receipts from non-property tax 



sources which has led to 
increased short term borrowing 
and deficits in city operations. 

McCauley delivered his 
remarks at a coffee hour held at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald 
Hayes, 51 Puritan Drive, Quincy 
Center. 

He reminded his listeners that 
in May, 1978, he released a study 
of Quincy's financial problems 
and recommended that estimates 
of revenue from non-property tax 
sources be more realistic. 

In spite of his recommenda- 
tions, he said, once again 
estimated receipts in fiscal 1979 



and 1980 exceeded actual 
revenues by more than 
$3,700,000. 

McCauley also noted that he 
correctly predicted a" 60-cent 
decrease in the tax rate for fiscal 
1979 was not realistic and would 
lead to a large tax increase in 
1980. The tax rate in 1980 went up 
$27.40. 

McCauley, a high honor 
graduate of Bentley College, who 
also holds a diploma in municipal 
finance from Bentley, said if he is 
elected mayor, he will devote a 
major effort to curing Quincy's 
financial ills. 



Incumbents' Best Not 
Good Enough Says Conroy 



"The incumbents have done 
their best," Patrick Conroy 
conceded, "but their best is 
inadequate to deal with the 
problems of the Quincy public 
schools. 

"In spite of their good 
intentions, I don't believe they 



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LAS VEGAS NIGHT 

Saturday, July 25, 1981 

7:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. 

at 
Knights of Pythias Hall 

1 1 Evans Drive (corner of Central) 

Stoughton, Mass. 

Admission $2 

Cash Prizes Central Air Conditioned 

Cash door prizes hourly 
Free Refreshments Bar available 

Sponsored by Knights of Pythias - proceeds to charity 



Ueale &t. 
3fal| Market 

35 Yearsat35BealeSt. 

SPECIAL 
Fresh Notive c95 
Swordfish ' 



i 



lb. 



Fresh Steamers $1.10 lb. 

Fresh Lobster Meat $14.95 lb. 

Fresh Crabmeat Salad Roll $2.15 each 

Stuffed Flounder with Newburg Sauce 
or 
Baked Haddock with Lemon Butter. Each served with 
French Fries or Potalo Salad. $1.95 



Wollaston 479-0039 



have even an idea about how to 
cope with the changes that have 
taken place in schools, in govern- 
ment and in society." 

Conroy, a candidate for the 
School Committee, spoke at a 
house party at the home of John 
and Maryanne Mahoney, 222 
Quincy Shore Drive, Atlantic. 

"When 1 take office in 
January," he said, "mediocrity 
will no longer be an acceptable 
standard of performance. 

"I intend to make it the policy 
of the Quincy School Committee 
to reward excellence and to 
discharge poor performers. 

"Principals will be given the 
authority they need to get results 
but if they fail they will be 
removed from the ranks of 
management." 

Conroy said that he is 
available, to meet with any group 
of individuals, large or small, to 
discuss school issues in Quincy. 
He may be reached at 328-1409 or 
at 272 Billings St., Quincy, 02171 . 

8 Residents 
Graduate 

From Suffolk 

Eight young men and women 
from Quincy were awarded 
bachelor degrees from Suffolk 
University at its recent 
commencement. 

Michael E.A. O'Malley, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. William V. 
O'Malley, 78 Andrews Rd., 
Wollaston, was awarded a 
doctorate cumf laude from Suffolk 
law School. He is a member of Phi 
Delta Phi Legal Fraternity. 

Receiving bachelor degrees 
were: 

Maryanne Conway, 13 Royal 
St.; Ann Healy Cosgrove, 128 
Shore Ave.; Mary L. Kilcommons, 
80 Alrick Rd.; William P. Malloy. 
56 Elm Ave.; Judy M. McQuinn, 
24 Macy St.; Joseph J. PreviteJr., 
97 Faxon Lane; James M. Ridlen, 
91 Rock Island Rd.; Katherine M. 
Rohan, 500 Hancock St. 

Also graduating was Mary C. 
Bono of Everett, legislative aide to 
Rep. Robert A. Cerasoli of 
Quincy. 




Attorney Services 

ALAN H. SEGAL 

175 Quincy Shore 328"6545 
Drive, Quincy 

«»-•»«. 848-6272 

General Practice 

Criminal & Family Law 

Personal Injury Claims 

Real Estate 

Wills & Trusts 

NO CHARGE FOR FIRST 
OFFICE VISIT 



— I 



v 



Raymondi Vows No Loss 
In Fire, Police Protection 



Thursday, July 23, 1981 Quincy Sun Page II 



4 Residents 
Dartmouth Graduates 



"With Proposition 2'/ 2 and the 
trend towards streamlining 
government, people ask if their 
police and fire protection will be 
reduced," said City Council Daniel 
G. Raymondi. 

"My answer is simple and direct 
— not if I'm elected mayor." 

Raymondi, a candidate for 
mayor, outlined his thoughts on 
public safety at a house party at the 
home of Marie and Joseph 
Graham, 50 Mayflower Rd., 
Squantum. 

"My public record is one of 
strong support of Quincy's 
firefighters and police officers," he 
said. "Public safety is an issue that 
I will not compromise on. 

"The protection of life and 
liberty in all sections of Quincy, 
especially in isolated neighbor- 
hood such as Squantum, Houghs 
Neck and Germantown, is 
something that I have a deep and 
personal concern about." 

Raymondi cited recent FBI 
statistics that show an alarming 
increase in violent crime such as 
robbery, rape and murder, 
statistics which prove, he said, 
"that no community is safe from 
crime." 

Raymondi told the gathering 
that he understands their anxiety 
over the possible closing of the 
Squantum Fire Station. 

"As a ward councillor," he said, 
"I am extremely sensitive to the 
absolute necessity of proper 
response times both for fire and 

Ernest Gervino 
Receives Doctorate 

Ernest Gervino, son of Mr. and 
Mrs Ralph Gervino of Quincy, 
has received a doctorate in 
applied anatomy and physiology 
from Boston University's Depart- 
ment of Health Sciences. 

Dr. Gervino, who lives in 
Dorchester, is on the staff of 
HealthStyle, a heart attack 
prevention program affiliated 
with Harvard Medical School, 
Brigham and Women's Hospital 
and Beth Israel Hospital. 

A graduate of Northeastern 
with a master's degree from BU, 
he has worked as a research 
consultant at the MIT Clinical 
Research Center and has been a 
research fellow at BU since 1977. 




Dental 
Corner 

by 



Lee A. Welky D.M.D. 

SPACES.' 

Q: Why is it important to close 
in spaces after teeth are ex- 
tracted? 

A: For several reasons: With 
several spaces in the mouth 
one can not chew properly, 
which may lead to poor 
digestion and stomach prob- 
lems? Also the adjoining 
teeth may shift, creating 
new spaces in other areas of 
the mouth, as well as maloc- 
clusion (improper bite), per- 
idental disease, and a host 
of other problems. 

Q: I went for a dental examina- 
tion, and they wanted to 
take "study models" of my 
mouth. Why? 

A: Study models are usually 
plaster casts made from im- 
pressions taken of your up- 
per and lower teeth. Putting 
them together, the dentist 
can detect any problems 
that need correcting. 

Questions May be sent to . . . 

Lee A. Welky D.M.D. 

234 Sea Street 

Quincy 

479-3030 



police protection. 

"I would continue to oppose the 
closing of any fire station in the 
city of Quincy." 

Raymondi pointed out that he 
has served as assistant district 
attorney for Norfolk County and 
as a public defender in Quincy 



District Court. 

"My experience in the judicial 
system has given me a special 
insight towards crime and its 
accompanying problems," he said. 
"That insight will be useful in 
formulating crime and fire 
prevention programs for Quincy." 



Four students from Quincy were 
among more than 1,000 young 
men and women who received 
degrees from Dartmouth college at 
its 21 Ith commencement exercises 
recently. 

They are Paul J. Atchison, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank T. 



Atchison, 55 French St.; Dcron F. 
E/ickson, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
David C. Ezickson, 35 Miller Stile 
Rd.; Brian P. Reidy, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Timothy J. Reidy. 211 
Whitwell St.; Thomas D. Nee, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. James M. Nee, 
161 Crabtree Rd. 



BACK IN HIGH 
DAN RAYMONDI RAN 
FOR MORE THAN 
TOUCHDOWNS. 




II 




'tiring the early 1960's Dan Raymondi 
was a football star at Quincy High Scliool. In 
fact, he was good enough to be named a High 
School All- American. But Dan didn't just run 
for touchdowns in high school. He also ran for 
Class President. And he was elected to the 
post in both his junior and senior years. 

After high school Dan went on to Holy Cross 
where he excelled in academics (Dean's List 
student) and athletics (captain of the football 
team). Later, while a full-time student at Boston 
College Law School, Dan ran for and won a seat 
on the Quincy School Committee. 

Four years and many accomplishments 



Raymond 



Mrs. Dennis F. Ryan, 84 Fenno Street. Wollaston, MA 



later, Dan's sense of civic duty 
prompted him to run for the City 
Council. That was six years ago. And 
in his 10 years of public life, Dan has 
never lost an election. During that time 
he has done a lot for his constituents, 
especially while serving as the newly appointed 
Chairman of the Downtown and Economic 
Development Committee. He's also served 
as an Assistant District Attorney and Public 
Defender at Quincy District Court 

Now, Dan Raymondi would like to be able 
to do even more for the residents of Quincy. 
So he's running again. Only this time he's in 
the race for Mayor. Dan is 
very serious about his 
mayoral bid. Because 
to him public 
service is 
no game. 



Mayor 





P«I5* 12 Quincy Sun Thursday. July 23, 1981 



Obituaries 



Charles Rizzo, 82, Barber, 
'No. 1 NQHS Football Fan' 



Ellen W. Hourihane, 75, 
Retired Teacher 



A funeral Mass for Ellen W. 
Hourihane. 75. of Quincy, a retired 
high school teacher, will be held 
today (Thursday) at 9 a.m. in St. 
Joseph's Church. Quincy. 

Miss Hourihane died Monday 
in Quincy City Hospital after a 
biief illness. 

Born in Somersworth, N.H..she 
was graduated from the University 
of New Hampshire. She was a 
teacher in Fitchburg. Hudson and 
Provincetown schools. 

Miss Hourihane was also 
formerly employed in the clerical 
department of Bethlehem Ste.'l 



Quincy, and Gilchrist's, formerly 
in Quincy. 

She is survived by a sister, Mrs. 
Margaret F. Gannon of Quincy; 
and cousins Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Troy of Dux bury, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jerome P. Troy of Marshfield, and 
Mr. and Mrs. MelvinK. Proctor of 
Vero Beach. Fla. 

Visiting hours were scheduled 
for 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. 
yesterday (Wednesday) at Deware 
Brothers Funeral Home. 576 
Hancock St. 

Burial will be in Holy Family 
Cemetery, Somersworth. 



A funeral Mass for Charles 
Ri//o, 82, of North Quincy, a 
retired barber and "one of the 
number one fans" of North Quincy 
High School's football team, will 
be held today (Thursday) at 10 
a.m. at Sacred Heart Church. 

Mr. RiK7.0 died Monday in 
Carney Hospital. Dorchester. after 
a brief illness. 

"He was one of the most loyal 
North Quincy supporters," said 
Carl Leone, director of athletics 
for the city of Quincy and former 
North Quincy football coach. 

"After football games, the bus 
would be stopped at the kid's 
request at his (Mr. Ri//o's) barber 



shop in North Quincy," said 

Leone. 

'The kids would get out and 
sing, and he (Mr. Ri//o) would 
award flowers to the winning 
team", said l.eone who added that 
Mr. Ri//o attended many 
Thanksgiving Day games. 

After Mr. Ri//o's retirement in 
1972, he continued toattend games 
and show interest in the team 
members, remembered l.eone. 

Mr. Rii/o was horn in Italy and 
served with the Italian Army 
during World War I. 

He came to this country in 1921. 
A lifelong barber, he lived in 
Quincv for 54 years. 



Mr. Ri//o was a member of the 
Quincv Sons of Italy, and the 
Arigona Society, Quincy. 

Husband of the late Mrs. 
Rosalia (Castrogiovanni) Ri//o, 
he was the father of Louis of 
Quincy; Salvatore A. of 
Randolph. Charles J. of Quincy 
and Anna I. Ma//ola of Brighton; 
brother of Peter Ri//oand Susan 
Cacci. both of ltaly;grandfatherof 
15 children; great grandfather of 
six children. 

Visiting hours were scheduled 
for 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. 
yesterday (Wednesday) at 
Keohane Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 



William Walsh, 84, Retired Postal Employee 



Stanley H. Becker, 90, 
Worked For Ice Cream Companies 



A funeral Mass for William 
Walsh, 84, of Quincy, a retired 
postai service employee, was held 
yesterday (Wednesday) in St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston. 



Mr. Walsh died Saturday in 
Quincy City Hospital. He had 
lived in Quincy for 30 years. Born 
in Boston, he had lived in South 
Boston before moving to Quincy. 



Funeral services for Stanley H. 
(Pop) Becker, 90. of Quincy, a 
retired employee of Select and 
McManus ice cream companies, 
were held Saturday at Lydon- 
Russell Funeral Home, 644 
Hancock St. 

Mr. Becker died July 15, in 
Quincy City Hospital after a brief 
illness. 



Quincy 
Hearing 
Aid Dispensers 



.ocated next door 

Bargain Center 

i 

Hearing aids and 

batteries are now 

available to Medicaid 

Card holders' 

*W, ■ 



He had lived in Quincy most of 
his life. 

Born in Isle of Jersey, he served 
with British Army Intelligence in 
World War I. 

Mr. Becker was employed as a 
salesman until World War 11 when 
he served with the Merchant 
Marines. 

He was a member of the Rural 
Masonic Lodge, Quincy. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Frances (Furst) Becker; and a son. 
Stanley Becker of Natick. 

Rev. Stanley Becker of Natick 
Church of Christ officiated at the 
services. 



Patricia M. Munchbach, 51 



Trials 



773-0900 

Robert Karat 

Certified Hearing 
Aid Awdioloaitr 



-trCf' MEMORIAL 



\ 



> 



GIFTS 

Luiunous vestments altar 
books candles stoles 
sacred vessels etc 



All Memorial gilts promptly 
mcmonalred without charge 

A. E. GOODHUE CO. 

13-15 School St., Quincy, 472 3090 



A funeral Mass for Patricia M. 
(Slattery) Munchbach, 51, a 
Quincy resident for 18 years, was 
held yesterday (Wednesday) at 
St. Joseph's Church, Quincy 
Point. 

Mrs. Munchbach died Monday 
in Hull following a long illness. 

She was born in Cambridge and 
had lived in Hull before moving to 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Munchbach is survived by 
her husband, Irving C. 
Munchbach; a daughter, 
Margaret Munchbach of Quincy; 
her mother, Margaret (Deprez) 
Slattery of Hull; three brothers, 
James C. Slattery of Lantana, 
Fla., John J. Slattery of West 
Palm Beach, Fla., and William P. 
Slattery of Stoughton; a sister, 
Mary Candido of Hull; and a 
grandson. 



Give Heart Fund 

Atierican Heart Association 



f. 



I 



I 

I 



Sweeney Joroihers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, SR. 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS. 

472-6344 



'1 



^IH»»— »^^Ti\— w— »HI\»»M»^w»JlnM 




uieeneo Janeral Bttmtt 



DENNIS S. SWEENEY, Director 
Non Sectarian 






74 ELM ST. 
QUINCY 

773-2728 



326 COPELAND 
W. QUINCY 

773-2728 



Successor to M. Joseph Sweeney 
PARKING FACILITIES 



Funeral arrangements were by 
Pine Funeral Home, 21 Emerald 
St., Hingham. Burial was in St. 
Paul's Cemetery, Hingham. 

Donations in her memory can 
be made to the American Cancer 
Society. 



A World War I Army veteran, 
he was a member of the Quincy 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post. 

Husband of the late Mrs. Alma 
G. (Hutchings) Walsh, he is 
survived by two sons, Robert J. 
Walsh of California and John 
Walsh of Macon, Ga.; two 
daughters, Carole Walsh and 
Claire Carroll, both of Quincy; 12 
grandchildren and three great 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were by 
Keohane Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. Burial was in Pine 
Hill Cemetery. 



Deaths 



Cieorgc J. Morris, 74, of Quincv. in 
Quincy City Hospital. July 9. 

Catherine A. (Porter) McDonald. 
78. of West Quincy, in Quincy City 
Hospital. July 10. 

Lillian A. Moodie. 93. of Quincy. in 
Quincy City Hospital, July 9. 

John O'Connell. 72. of Quincy, in 
the John Scott Nursing Home, June 9 

Kenneth C. Sharpe. 67. of 
Plymouth, formcrl> of Quincv. in 
Jordan Hospital. July 10. 

Lillian M. (MacLeod) Gale. 7K. oj 
North Quincy, in Quincy City 
Hospital, July 8. 

Florence (Fisher) Ainsworth. 92. of 
Milton, formerly of Wollaston, in a 
local nursing home. July 9. 

Mary A. (Crowley) Mirabito. of 
Quincy. July 8. 

Olga (Wolf) Husson, of Quincy. in 
Quincy City Hospital, July 18. 

Adulpina (Tamosauskas) Gerulskis, 
of Dover, Delaware, formerly of 
Wollaston. July 16. 

William K. Lorimer. Jr.. of Quincy, 



July 17. 

Minnie B. (Zinck) Hopgood. 77, of 
Hanover, formerly of Quincy. in 
Falmouth. July 16. 

Charles Ri//o, of North Quincy. 
July 20. 

Raymond J. Chandler, 80, of 
Lastham, formerly of Squantum, at 
home, July 13. 

Isabelle L. (Laing) Mandigo. 90, of 
Braintree. formerly of Quincy, in 
South Shore Hospital. Wevmouth, 
July 15. 

John A. Greene. 74. ol Quincy. in 
Quincy City Hospital. July 15. 

David M. Bennett. 62. of West 
Roxbury. formerly of Quincy, in 
Quigley Memorial Hospital, Chelsea. 
July II. 

Diana (Pepi) Teesdale. 64, of 
Roundup. Mont., formerly of Quincy. 
in Roundup Memorial Hospital. July 
13. 

Ovila Dupont. of Quincy. July 14. 

George P. Paleslis, of Quincy. July 
14. 



[—Hancock 



J Monument Co. 

John Ricciuti & Sons Inc. 

295 Hancock St., North Quincy 

[Opposite No. Quincy High School] 

Best Domestic and 

Imported Granite 

Visit Our Large 

and Complete Display 

All Monuments Reasonably Priced 

Bronze and Granite Cleaning Estimates on Request. 

Open Mon. thru Sat. by Appointment on Sunday.- 




4723447 



leiuare 



FUNERAL HOME and CHAPELS 




Donald M. Deware 

Director 



576 Hancock Street, Quincy 
Tel: 472-1 137 

Non-Sectarian 
Services rendered to any distance 

39 yeais under same Ownership and Directorship 



«— WVI^ 



Thursday, July 23, 1981 Quincy Sun Pa|e 13 



Rev. Kimmell President 
Neighborhood Housing Services 



Pastor James Kimmell of the 
F»Uh Lutheran Church was 
elected president of the Quincy 
Neighborhood Housing Services, 
Inc.. at a recent meeting of the 
board of directors at the Faith 
Lutheran Center. 

Other officers elected include: 

Gerard Kavanaugh, Planning 
Department, vice president; 
Charles Pearce, president of 
Quincy Savings Bank, treasurer; 
Charles Sullivan, senior vice 
president of the Hancock Bank, 
vice treasurer; Lucille Rusconi, 
secretary. 

Other members of the board arc 
Barbara Lynch, Granite 
Cooperative Bank; Richard 
Meade, Planning Department; 
Arthur Foley, Mary Weafer, Jean 
Bates, Ellen Hurley. Jean LaCoste. 
Mary J. Mastrantonio, Martha 
Robinson, and Lucy Vespaziani. 

Neighborhood Housing 
Services is non-profit partnership 
of local banks, the city a*nd 
residents of a target area whose 
goal is to stimulate reinvestment in 
older neighborhoods. 

The Quincy target area is 




Merrymount Church 

Youth Group 

Aids Handicapped Girls 



NEWLY ELECTED officers of the Quincy Neighborhood Housing 
Services are, left to right, Gerard Kavanaugh, vice president; James L. 
Kimmell, president; Lucille Rusconi, secretary; Charles Pearce, 
treasurer; and Charles Sullivan, assistant treasurer. 



Southwest Quincy, bordered by 
the MBTA tracks. Granite St., 
Furnace Brook Parkway and the 
Southeast Expressway. 

The QNHS office at 266 Water 
St. is currently staffed by 



Executive Director Jane Ford. An 
administrative assistant, a housing 
rehabilitation specialist and a 
home improvement specialist are 
expected to join the staff in 
August. 



St. Chrysostom's Parish Planning Auction 



St. Chrysostom's Parish, One 
Linden St., Wollaston, has formed 
a committee to plan a service 
auction at the church Oct. 3. 

Purpose of the auction is to 
generate additional funds "for the 
parish. 

Services to be offered to the 
highest bidder can include: 
preparing a dinner for four, 
providing an evening of 
babysitting, giving a one hour 
tennis lesson for a beginner, 
painting a room, washing 
windows, sewing, baking a loaf of 
bread once a month for six 
months. 

Parishioners are asked to 
consider services they could offer 
at the auction. 

Licensed auctioneer Paul 



Feeling Guilty? Many 
people do. Reasons range 
from broken homes to 
unbroken habits. What- 
ever the cause, it's an 
ugly feeling. Guilt is 
both the fact of having 
done wrong and the feel- 
ing of blame for doing 
it. It's worst when the 
way you live leaves you 
empty, frustrated, and 
filled with regret. But 
there is a solution. Face 
the fact and remember 
God forgives. Then let 
Him! Before this ad was 
placed we started pray- 
ing for you because we 
care. Give us a chance to 
share. 



'the 



Glad Tidings Church 

158 Washington Street 

QUINCY 

...A church where something 
"WONDERFUL" happens 
every Sunday! 

The Church... 

...in Study 9:30 a.m. 

...in Worship 10:45 p.m. 

...in Celebration 6:30 p.m. 
Comc.be a part. ..help us 
Grow! 



Meader has donated his services to 
St. Chrysostom's for the event. 



Auction festivities will include a 
pot luck supper. 



A youth group from Qiiincy's 
Our Lady of Good Counsel Church 
has aided in the building of a new 
playground for the residents of 
Braintree's Rainbow House, a 
community residence for handi- 
capped girls. 

Rainbow House is sponsored by 
Braintree St. Coletta Day School 
and located at 146 Mutton Lane, 
Weymouth. The fund raising 
project for building the play- 
ground began in February, 1981 
when some 30 members of the 
.Youth Spiritual Development 
Group of the Quincy parish 
decided they wanted to help out. 

The group had a cookie sale 
which raised $300 for the 
Rainbow House playground. That 
"would have cost at least $5,000" 
to build stated Patrice Kenney, 
director of Rainbow House. 

After David Kreuz, one of the 
group's adult supervisors, of 25 
Samoset Ave., decided that the 
money could be used to obtain 
materials for the playground, the 
group brought all the necessary 
materials and built the outdoor 
recreation area. The finished 
playground includes a balance 



beam, tire swing, slide, a sand- 
box, and a crawl-through 
consisting of tires. 

The group advisors include 
Rev. Peter Martocchio, Our Lady 
of Good Counsel pastor, Larry 
Shea, Louis Mazzini and David 
Kreuz. 




Wollaston Church 
of the fNazarene 




37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston 

— Services — 

Sunday- 11:00 am A 6:00 p.m. 

Wednesday- 7:00 p.m. 

"Your Community Church" 



HELP US - HELP THEM 



What 

is the 

Mass. 

Association 

for 

Handicapped | 

Children? 



You Are Cordially Invited To 

A PRIVATE EVENING 

at the 

JOHN F. KENNEDY LIBRARY 

Columbia Point on Dorchester Bay 

To Benefit 

THE MASSACHUSETTS ASSOCIATION 

FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN 

Wednesday, August 12, 1981 

At 7:00 p.m. a film on the life of 

John F. Kennedy 

by Charles Guggenheim 

Wine, Refreshments and Music 

until 10:00 p.m. 

DONATION 

$10 per person 



It is a charitable corporation organized in 1973 
under Chapter 180 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. It was started by a group of people who are 
interested in the too often overlooked problems of 
educating children who are physically 
handicapped. The organization serves as a source 
of funds for special projects and needs at schools 
and hospitals that educate, train and rehabilitate 
handicapped children. It is devoted to the principle 
that every child, whatever the physical handicap, 
should be given the opportunity to grow and 
develop so that the child may reach his or her full 
potential. 

It is an organization whose members include 
people from all walks of life, both 
professional and non-professional. 
The members share the common 
awareness that in the press of daily 
living each of us and society in 
general tends to forget about the 
young children who need a 
little extra help to surmount a 
physical handicap, 
his charity has no paid em- 
ployees, has never hired 
professional fundraisers. 
The officers of the Asso- 
ciation are: Paul Clasby, 
President and Treasurer; 
Richard Ward, Clerk; 
Edward Graham, Direc- 
tor; Joseph Clasby, 
Director; George 
Mathieson, Director. 



Ticket Coordinators: 

Ralph J. Maher 

Peter Eleey 

Joseph McLaughlin 

George Mathieson 



Please make checks payable to: 

Massachusetts Association 

For Handicapped Children 

Box 778 

Quincy, Mass. 02269 

Return address requested for ticket delivery. 



Pag* 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 23. 1981 



128 On Sterling Honor Roll 



Sterling Junior High School 
lists 128 students on the 
fourth-quarter honor roll. They 
are: 

High Honors 
Crude 7 
Mark I.. Connelly, Murk !•'. 
Crosby, Linda M. Dullnig, Brcnda M. 
I'errazzi, Cynthia L. Moore, Peter S. 
Orenberg, Lisa J. Pannella, Laurie J. 
Pitts, Joanne Sweeney. 
Honors 
Grade 7 
Jayson M. Block, Heidi M. 



Bowness, Brian T. Calabro, Kristin L. 
Caruso, Lisa Compston, Steven M. 
Constas, Carole A.Deuly, Debru A. 
DclVecchio, franklin T. Derbcs, 
Klizubeth A. Dohcrty, Michelle 
Grant, Beth T. Greenfield, John C. 
Heath, Stacey M. Horrigan, Barry M. 
Johnson, Janine M. Kelly, Cynthia A. 
LaChance, Daniel C. Litterio, Ronald 
I'. Luisi, Marion C. Martin, Timothy 
J. McCarthy, 1 lizabeth Nourse, 
Donald R. Parry, Joseph Poillucci, 
Lori M. Richardson, Steven P. 
Schow, Maria Styles. 





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165 Old Colony Avenue, Wollaston 

Teke St. Ann ■ Roed whlcfi It opposite the melngele to Vetoren t Stadium. 

Optn 7 Days — These cash n' carry prices good thru Sunday 



Hi^h Honors 
Crock 8 

Genevieve Brancaecio, Sherri A. 
Cavallo, Joanne R. Doherly, 
Christina I eterowski, Kimberly A. 
Leman, Joyee S. Leun;.', Tabatha D. 
Mclzard, William I'. Milne, Patricia A. 
Tellier. 

Honors 
Grade 8 

Jacqueline Aronson, Nancy \.. 
Begucrie, Lawrence Conome, 
Kathleen A. Bowen, Debbie J. 
Brown, Sean I'.. Cahill, Lisa A. 
Campbell, Marie A. Cedrone, Lisa M. 
Cianfarini, Joseph L. Ciardi, Diane M. 
Coletti, Paul B. Cook, Robert S. 
Corrieri, Laurie J. Davis, Panayiotis 
Delkouras, Michele A. DelVecchio, 
Carol A. DePaulo, Darline l\ Derbcs, 
Nadia L. Derbcs, Diane B. Dewevcr, 
Paul A. DiCarlo, Lesly A. DiStelano, 
Michael T. Draicchio, Patrick J. 
Duggan, James M. I oik, Melissa A. 
Hart, Scott D. Henderson, Susan P. 
Howlett, Teresa A. LaRosa, Robert 
C. Legrow, Donna M. Litterio, 
Heather M. Mackey, Brian T. Mahon, 
Bruce D. Marshall, Kenneth J. 
McKlroy, Brcnda L. Mitchell, Gary J. 
Orlando, Michael S. Rogers, Patricia 
A. Rooney, I- d ward W. Rossini, 
Chcryol A. Ruscio, Jan K. Savoie, 
Suzanne Shaw, Ruth Simon, Mary K. 
Thomas, Daron Tucker, Kathleen 
Tyler, John H. Wholey, Laureen S. 
Young. 

High Honors 
Grade 9 

Mary J. Collins, Diane M. DePolo, 
Kimberly M. Henderson, Stephen J. 
Kradolfer, Cheryl A. Miller, Norecn 
M. Sweeney. 

Honors 
Grade 9 

Jackie Boire, Lisa A. Burrelli, 
Joyce I'. Callahan, Daniel J. Carroll, 
Michael J. Carroll, Susan M, 
Chepetsky, Christopher L. Constas, 
Kelly A. Currie, Barbara A. Davis, 
Brian M. DeCelle, I rancesco Dulisse, 
Sheryl A. I.rikson, Sean Galvin, 
Nancy M. Graham, Terry C. 
Hamilton, Barbara Layman, Jessica 
M. Lumaghini, Patricia Madden, 
Cynthia A. Manupelli. Roberta D. 
Maze, Lynda K. McCarthy, Laurie E. 
Pannella, Rory M. Dela Paz, Barry J. 
Pike, Michael P. Rieca, Dennis D. 
Shannon, David J. Sico, James !•'.. 
Spink. 

Edwin Barrows 
Completes Course 

SP4 Edwin Barrows of 494 
Willard St., West Quincy. a 
member of the 283rd Transporta- 
tion Co. of the Army Reserves, 
recently completed the First Army 
Basic Non-Commissioned Officers 
Course at Camp Edwards. 



O'Brien Would Make 
School Area Changes 



James O'Brien of 19 River St., 
Quincy Point, a candidate for 
Quincy School Committee, told 
those attending a recent coffee 
hour in Houghs Neck he was 
anxious to start making changes in 
school related areas. 

The areas include teacher 
evaluations, user fees, discipline 
and responsibilities. 

O'Brien acknowledged that the 
tasks of effecting changes in these 
areas might appear intimidatingly 
difficult to some. 

Making the changes, according 
to O'Brien, would require a much 
greater flow of all of kinds of 
information to not only parents 



but all taxpayers who support the 
system. 

O'Brien believes that Proposi- 
tion 2 1 /: has sensitized people to the 
governmental processes affecting 
their lives. Today, according to 
O'Brien, an informed citizenry can 
exert the pressures needed to 
institute changes. 

The coffee hour was given by 
George and Mary McCarron. 
Among those in attendance were 
City Councillor and mayoral 
candidate Francis McCauley, Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Kamp, Mrs. 
Barbara Lynch, Mrs. Margaret 
O'Connor and Mrs. Rosemary 
Gaura. 



Cortese Censures 
Ward 2 Playgrounds 



Joseph F. Cortese, a candidate 
for the City Council from Ward 2, 
says he has inspected playgrounds 
in the ward and has found hazards 
to children, improper mainten- 
ance and noisy gatherings of 
youth. 

Cortese spoke to a gathering of 
campaign committee members at 
his headquarters. 

"After listening to neighboring 
individuals whose children use 
these playgrounds throughout the 
summer months," he said, "i have 
found there exists parental 
concern regarding their children's 
safety regarding proper 
maintenance of these areas. 

"In listeningtothecomplaintsol 
abutters, who in many cases are 
homeowners adjacent to these 
playgrounds, there is great concern 
with the considerable noise effect 
of youthful gatherings beyond the 



normal playground hours." 

Cortese said one neighbor told 
him "if anyone wants to play tennis 
here they must bring along not 
only their tennis rackets and tennis 
balls but also a net for the court as 
well as a broom to sweep away the 
broken glass and bottles. 

"It is my understanding that 
certain playgrounds in Ward 2 
have been earmarked to receive 
federal money to rehab certain of 
these areas which is expected to 
take place sometime in the late 
summer. 

"There is a definite need for 
consistency in keeping all of the 
playground areas in Ward 2 and 
their facilities up to the same high 
level of maintenance. 

"I plan to discuss with those 
currently involved with the matters 
the possibility of mW ining future 
federal rehab money for those 
areas not yet acted on." 



2nd Silver-Haired Legislature 
Set To Meet In November 



Deadline for senior citizens to 
complete nomination papers for 
seats in the second annual Massa- 
chusetts Silver-Haired Legis- 
lature is Friday, July 31 . 

The Silver Haired Legislature, 
with 200 people age 60 or older 
filling the 160 House and 40 
Senate seats, will be held over 
three days in November to high- 



= GEORGE'S DEATH = 
MUST BE DIFFICULT 
FOR THE CHILDREN. 




THEWE ALREADY BEEN ASKING 
A LOT OF QUESTIONS 

As in all other aspects of life, honesty is the best policy! 
Children can quickly see through adult uneasiness or deceit. 
Telling a child that the person died and giving a specific 
reason for the death is most honest and helpful. If children 
raise further questions, these too should be answered honest- 
ly. Death is not a common occurrence in the lives of most 
families. It is helpful to reassure children that they will be 
cared for in spite of the fact that things will be different with- 
out the deceased. It is helpful to include children in all 
ceremonies and as much as possible in decisions that will af- 
fect them but only if they wish to participate. A child's loss is 
real and will not go away by being ignored. 



Keohane 

FUNERAL HOME, INC. 

785 and 333 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY 773-3551 




light elder legislative priorities 
for 1982. 

Fifty signatures of senior 
citizens are needed to qualify for 
the ballot in the special election 
which will be held throughout the 
state Sept. 15. 

Nomination papers are avail- 
able at the Council on Aging and 
other home care agencies or by 
calling the Department of Elder 
Affairs Elder Hot Line, toll free, 
800-882-2003. 

Brian Sullivan 
Awarded Degree 

Brian T. Sullivan, 25. of 57 
Alrick Rd., West Quincy, was 
recently awarded a master of arts 
degree in mass communication at 
the 101st commencement of 
Emerson College, Boston. 

A 1973 graduate of Quincy 
High School, he is planning a 
career in television. 

He is also a 1977 graduate of U. 
Mass-Amherst. 

Receive 

Ilhaea Degrees 

Jeffrey Louis Lampert and 
Andrea L. Katz, both of Quincy, 
were graduated from Ithaca 
College, Ithaca, N.Y.. recently in 
the school's 86th commencement. 

Lampert, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Irwin L. Galkin, 31 Colonial 
Drive, Quincy Center, received a 
degree in sociology. 

Miss Katz, daughter of Mrs. 
Charlotte Katz, 60 Puritan Drive, 
and Nathan N. Katz, 57 Stewart 
St., Quincy Point, received a 
degree in planned studies. 



NEWSCARRIERS 


WANTED 


Here's a chance to earn 


extra money by building 


a Quincy Sun home 


delivery route. 


Telephone: 471-3100 



Thursday, July 23, I9SI Quincy Sun Page 15 



Drops 2 In Row 

Morrisette's Title 
Chances Hit Snag 



The hopes of the Morrisette 
Legion baseball team of winning 
the Zone 6 Division B title hit a 
serious snag over the weekend 
when it dropped successive 4-2 
decisions to Randolph and 
Holbrook to lower its record to 10- 
8. 

However, thanks to Norwell's 4- 
2 win over Weymouth, Morrisette 
remains hot on Weymouth's heels. 
Weymouth is 12-7. 

Morrisette will host Milton 
Friday night at 8 at Adams Field 
and Sunday at I at Norwell will 
finish a protested game with 
Norwell. The game will resume in 
the sixth inning with the score tied, 
3-3. 

Previous to the losses to 
Randolph and Holbrook, 
Morrisette had defeated 
Wollaston, 4-1, as Mark Millane 
pitched a no-hitter. The Wollaston 
run was unearned. 

The no-hitter came as a surprise 
to Millane and Coach Ray 
Cattaneo. Cattaneo didn't notice 
until the last inning that the 
scorebook showed no hits. 

Millane struck out five and 
walked four. He struck out Mike 
Venna to end the game with a 
flourish. 

Morrisette scored twi<£ in the 



first inning on a single by Marty 
McLoughlin, a triple by Brian 
Reale and a single by Millane. 

Morrisette added a run in the 
third when Reale walked, moved 
to second on an error and scored 
on Jim Bandera's single. It scored 
its final run in the fifth when Reale 
scored his third run on an error. 

Wollaston scored in the fifth 
when Andy Eames walked, stole 
second and scored on a fielder's 
choice and ensuing error. 

Randolph's Mike Karas 
defeated Morrisette for the second 
time last Friday night (he had 
blanked them, 2-0, earlier), with 
Dave Morris hitting a long three- 
run homer in the first inning off 
Gary DiNardo which proved 
enough to win. 

Morrisette had opened the 
scoring in the top of the first on 
Reale's single and Millane's double 
and scored its second and final run 
in the second on Kevin Howlett's 
triple and DiNardo's single. 

Morrisette hit the ball hard on 
several occasions but right at the 
fielders. DiNardo blanked 
Randolph until the sixth when it 
added its fourth run. 

Sunday night Holbrook's Dan 
Meehan saved the win for Joe 



Gainey with some outstanding 
relief work. Morrisette out hit 
Holbrook, 9-4, and had Gainey in 
trouble many times but he and 
Meehan managed to work out of 
tight jams. 

Paul Earle was the starter for 
Morrisette and went four innings, 
giving up three runs on two hits, 
but he walked six. Bruce Tobin 
and Kevin Whelan finished up. 

Morrisette scored a run in the 
fourth on a triple by John Balzano 
and a double by Bandera. It scored 
again in the seventh on a double by 
Jim O'Toole and a single by 
Reale. 

Wollaston was blanked by 
Braintree, 2-0, despite a well- 
pitched six-hitter by Steve Healy. 
Braintree's Jack Hol/man held 
Wollaston to four hits, two by 
Venna. 

Wollaston will play at Norwell 
Friday at 6 o'clock. 

Quincy was handed an III 
thrashing by Weymouth as Glenn 
Fitzgerald, the winning pitcher, 
improved his record to 4-0. Chris 
Dracchio drove in Quincy's only 
run with a single. 

Quincy will play at Hingham 
Friday at 6. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 




Over 200 Compete 
In City Junior Olympics 



The annual Quincy Recreation 
Junior Olympics were held last 
week at Veterans Memorial 
Stadium with more than 200 
competitors and spectators. 

Children from playgrounds 
throughout the city participated 
in 28 events with District 5 
winning by a close margin over 
runnerup District 2 and third 
place District 1 . Districts 3 and 4 
were close behind. 

The winners and city 
champions: 

Midget girl 25-yard dash, 
Kathy Cahill; midget boy 25-yard 
three legged race, Terri Hack and 
Tom Collins; junior boy 25-yard 



three legged race, Anthony 
Battistoro and Brian Glavin; 
midget girl 25-yard three legged 
race, Lauren McNamara and 
Katie Hardy; junior girl 25-yard 
three legged race, Tracy 
Thornhill and Julie Cosre; midget 
boy 50-yard dash, Jim DeCarli; 
junior girl 50, Caroline Morash; 
junior boy 50, Mansoor Rashid; 
senior girl 50, Karen Eames; 
senior boy 100, Paul Canavan; 
junior girl 220, Tracy Cullen; 
junior boy 220, Jimmy McAdams; 
senior girl 220, Sandra Dunn; 
senior boy 220, Charlie Murphy; 
senior girl 440, Maryanne 
Kelleher; senior boy 440, Fazal 



Rashid. 

Softball Throw: Midget girls. 
Sheila Sullivan; midget boys, 
Chris Noble; junior girls, Laurie 
Knopf; junior boys, Steven 
Constas; senior girls, Lisa Steen; 
senior boys, Kevin Whaler. 

Long Jump: Midget girls, Jodi 
Farrell; midget boys, Joseph 
Fantasia; junior girls, Tracy 
Thornhill; junior boys, Jim 
McAdams; senior girls, Sandy 
Dunn; senior boys, Fazel Rashid. 



DAN ROWLEY of Quincy was awarded a pair of varsity letters for his 
participation on Bentley College's cross country and track teams. He also 
won the Coach's Award in track. Rowley, a freshman and former Abp. 
Williams three-sport athlete, set several school records during the past 
year for the Falcons. During the indoor season he set new standards in 
both the 800 meter run (1:53.0) and the 880-yard run (1:56.0). He also 
participated on a record-breaking 1600-meter relay team during the 
spring season. 



Sports 



South Shore Upsets Hancock, 8-6 



South Shore Bank handed 
Hancock Bank its first defeat, 8-6, 
last week but Hancock still holds a 
two-game lead over State Street 
Bank in the South Shore Bankers 
Softball League. 

Hancock has a 10-1 record, 
followed by State Street Bank, 8-3; 



South Weymouth Savings, 7-5; 
Bay Bank/ Norfolk, 5-5; South 
Shore Bank, 4-7; Quincy Savings, 
3-7, and Quincy Co-operative 
Bank, 1-10. 

In last week's other games Bay 
Bank topped South Weymouth, 
10-8, and State Street Bank 
walloped Quincy Co-op, 15-1. 



Leg 



ion All-Star's Plan 
MDA Benefit Game 



Morrisette Legion coach Ray 
Cattaneo plans to hold an all-star 
game between the Zone 6 Division 
A and B stars for the benefit of the 



Muscular Dystrophy Association. 
Tentative plans are for the game 
to be played Monday night. Aug. 
3, at 7:30 at Adams Field. 



Stay AUvel 



f 



By John Vobnte 



ADVICE FOR SKIPPERS 



That too few skippers 
(whether it be of a canoe or a 
yacht) know little more than how 
to wear their yachtman's cap is 
attested to by the grim statistics 
collected annually by the U.S. 
Coast Guard. You can almost 
depend on the 1100 persons 
dying annually in boating 
accidents. 

The number one error is 
overloading the boat. Take the 
case of four fishermen who piled 
into a 14-foot boat and put out 
into a northern lake. So crippling 
was the small boat's load that 
only five inches of the craft's 
sides rose above the water. A 
clight wind blew up, and the 
resultant waves quickly swamped 
and sank the boat. Two, unable to 
swim, drowned. 



Overloading happens with 
cabin cruisers as well as row 
boats. The Coast Guard offers this 
simple advice: "If the boat looks 
or feels overloaded, it probably is, 
so don't take it out." 



* * * 
This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY. 
406 Hancock St.. No Quinev 

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: 
Charge Accounts 
Delivery Service 
Insurance Receipts 
Free Gift Wrapping 
Ostomy Supplies 
Tax Records on Request 
Utility Payments Mon. Thru Sat 9 
lo S 

Phone: 328-3426 



Welcome to 



Quirk 



FORD 



540 Southern Artery, Quincy 

(Formerly President Chev.) 

Open For: 

• SALES • SERVICE • PARTS 

400 New and Used 

Cars in Stock for 
Immediate Delivery 

770-0070 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 23, 1981 



• Babe Ruth 

Morrisette 
Bombs Firemen 



Junior League 



Morrisette exploded for eight 
runs in the bottom of the sixth 
and final inning to top Firemen, 
16-8, in a Babe Ruth League 
game, with Jack Outerbridge the 
winning pitcher. 

He went all the way, giving up 
seven hits, giving no walks and 
striking out three. Firemen 
scored seven unearned runs, one 
in the fifth and six in the top of 
the sixth as Morrisette 's defense 
fell apart. 

Morrisette opened with five 
runs in the first inning as Tom 
Connolly singled, stole second 
and scored on Vin Cristiani's 
double, Outerbridge tripled, Joe 
Grimaldi walked, Brian Scalata 
hit a two-run triple, and John 
Cristiani drove in another run 
with a single. 

In the third Morrisette made it 
7-0 on Scalata's two-run double. 
Firemen scored a run in the 
fourth but Morrisette got it back 
in the bottom half on Vin 
Cristiani's double. Firemen 
scored an unearned run in the 
fifth and then tied it at 8-8 with 
six in the sixth when Morrisette 
committed four errors. In the 
bottom half Morrisette exploded 
for eight runs. 

For Morrisette Vin Cristiani 
had two doubles and a single and 
four RBI; Scalata a double and 
triple and four RBI; Outerbridge 
and Grimaldi two hits apiece and 
Connolly, John Cristiani, Matt 
Elofson and Richie Kelley one 



each. Grimaldi and Scalata played 
strong defense. Playing well for 
Firemen were Brian Gibbons with 
two hits and Mike Miller, who 
had a key hit in the big sixth 
inning. 

Morrisette also bombed 
Barry's Deli, 15-1, behind the 
one-hit pitching of Vin Cristiani, 
who lost a no-hitter in the final 
inning on Paul Marshall's single. 
He also lost a shutout in that 
inning. He struck out 11 and 
walked three. 

Morrisette started fast with six 
runs in the first when John 
Cristiani led off with a single, 
stole second and scored on 
Connolly's single, Vin Cristiani 
and Outerbridge walked and both 
scored on Scalata's single. 
Scalata scored on Jerry Frazier's 
triple. Morrisette added two runs 
in the fourth on Outerbridge's hit 
and one in the fifth. 

It then exploded for six more in 
the sixth on a triple by 
Outerbridge, who had three hits, 
a pinch hit double by Ed Flynn, a 
triple by Kelley and singles by 
Doyle and Connolly. In Barry's 
seventh P. J. Hussey reached on 
an error, stole second, reached 
third on a passed ball and scored 
on Marshall's hit, spoiling 
Cristiani's no- hitter and shutout. 
Outerbridge and Frazier had 
three hits each for Morrisette and 
Connolly and Scalata had two 
apiece. Morrisette also played a 
strong defensive game. 



Gear Edges Rotary 
For N.L. Crown 



AIR CONDITIONED 

OLINDY'S 

170 Quincy Ave. 472-3597 
Summer Prices 

Day's A C < Evening's 

^m l/per string 

SPECIAL 

SATURDAY MORNING 
3 STRINGS for 



Foley Chrysler- Plymouth 

closed out the regular season by 
defeating Colonial Federal, 11-7, 
to improve its American League 
record to 19-3, best in either 
league, to give it the top-seeded 
spot in the Junior Baseball 
League playoffs. 

Boston Gear and Rotary 
finished with 18-4 records in the 
National League but Gear won the 
title in a playoff. 

Chris Marshall was the winning 
pitcher for Foley in the final 
regular season game, improving 
his record to 8-1. He struck out 
nine, running his season's total to 
112, walked three and he also 
scored a run. Jay DeBartolo had a 
double and single and scored two 
runs, Dan Biagini had two singles 
and scored twice, Chris Meyer 
played another outstanding game 
at first base and had a double and 
single and scored twice, Jim 
Dennis had a double and Tom 
Tagen and Sean Gately singles. 
After getting a 9-1 lead after two 
innings, Foley's usual strong 
defense collapsed and gave up 
five unearned runs in the third 
inning. 

Gear, which bounced back from 
last year's 6-16 record, edged 
Rotary, 5-4, in seven innings in 
the playoff game to decide the 
National League crown. Rotary 
had stayed right on Gear's heels 
all season, never trailing by more 
than two games. 
Mike Dever was the winning 



FINAL STANDINGS 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 




W 


L 


Foley 


19 


3 


Sears 


13 


9 


Kiwanis 


12 


10 


Burgin 


11 


11 


Remick's 


9 


13 


VFW 


3 


19 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


* Boston Gear 


19 


4 


Rotary 


18 


5 


Elks 


9 


13 


Houghs Neck 


7 


15 


Colonial 






Federal 


1 


15 


Keohane's 


6 


16 



Defeated Rotary in playoff 



pitcher, finishing with a brilliant 
10-0 record, relieving starter 
Larry Taglieri, who had pitched 
well, allowing six hits and striking 
out seven. Gear's offense was led 
by tri-captain Taglieri with three 
singles, one with the bases 
loaded, driving in the winning 
run. Matt Furtado had a double 
as did Shawn Craig and Nancy 
Flukes had a single. Tad Sheets 
made some outstanding defensive 
plays at second base. Paul 
Adams, Mike Cronin, Chris 



Higgins, Mike Paccetti, Chad 
Hallett, Mike Leonard. Ricky 
Dunham and Mossie Houlihan all 
played well for Gear. 

For Rotary Billy Burkhead 
pitched well and also had two 
doubles, John Pennellatore had a 
homer and double and Robby 
Fitzgerald, Joe Thompson and 
Bob McDonald all had singles. 
Steve Minichiello played well 
behind the plate. 

Gear, in the double elimination 
playoffs for the first time in years, 
was scheduled to meet Kiwanis 
last night (Wednesday) in its 
opener. 

Foley's opened the first round 
of the playoffs Sunday with a 7-6 
victory over Burgin Platner with 
Marshall the winning pitcher. He 
gave up seven hits, struck out five 
and walked four. It was anybody's 
game until the last out, Marshall 
striking out the final batter with 
the bases loaded. 

DeBartolo had a triple and two 
singles and scored a run, Meyer 
and Bob Laracy had RBI doubles, 
Biagini a two-run double and 
Dennis and Kevin Duffy singles. 
Mike Routier, playing third base 
in the sixth inning, made a game- 
saving grab of a line drive off the 
bat of Tom McDonald, who had 
two hits. Biagini made one of the 
best plays of the season, going 
deep behind thi.r, base to back 
hand a ground ball and throw the 
runner out, with Meyer making a 
fine pickup at first. 



Beach Swimming Schedule 



per string 



9 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. I 



The Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment announces the following 
schedule of swimming instruction 
for the city's beaches during the 
week of July 27-31. 

Monday, July 27, beach hours 
are from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 11:30 
a.m.; non-swimmer 2, 12 noon; 
beginner 1,11 a.m.; beginner 2, 
none scheduled; advanced 
beginner, 10:30 a.m.; inter- 
mediate, 10 a.m.; swimmer, 9:30 



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automotive specialists. 

471-6950 

111 McGRATH HIGHWAY, QUINCY 

Hours: 8 to 5:30 Mon. thru Fri. 



a.m.; basic rescue and advanced 
life saving, 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. 

Tuesday, July 28, beach hours 
are from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 12 
noon; non-swimmer 2, 12:30 
p.m.; beginner 1, 11 a.m.; 
beginner 2, 11:30 a.m.; advanced 
beginner, 9 a.m.; intermediate, 
10 a.m.; swimmer, 9:30 a.m.; 
basic rescue and advanced life 
saving, 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. 

Wednesday, July 29, beach 
hours are from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
The schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 
12 noon; non-swimmer 2, 12:30 
p.m.; beginner 1, 11 a.m.; 
beginner 2, 11:30 a.m.; advanced 
beginner, 9 a.m.; intermediate. 



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8:30 a.m.; swimmer, 8 a.m.; basic 
rescue and advanced life saving, 
9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

1 hursday, July 30, beach hours 
are from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 1 
p.m.; non-swimmer 2, 1:30 p.m.; 
beginner 1, 9 a.m.; beginner 2, 
9:30 a.m.; advanced beginner, 
12:30 p.m.; intermediate, 10 
a.m.; swimmer, 10:30 a.m.; basic 
rescue and advanced life saving, 

11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 

Friday, July 31, beach hours 
are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The 
schedule: Non-swimmer 1, 2 
p.m.; non-swimmer 2, 2:30 p.m.; 
beginner 1, 10 a.m.; beginner 2, 
10:30 a.m.; advanced beginner, 
1:30 p.m.; intermediate, 11 a.m.; 
swimmer, 11:30 a.m.; basic 
rescue and advanced life saving, 

12 noon to 1:30 p.m. 



A. E. GOODHUE CO. 

15 School St., Quincy 
4723090 



AIR CONDITIONING 
SERVICE 

Electrical 

Controls 

Complete System Service 

MORSE'S 

Auto Radiator 

1 79 W. Squantum St. 

Walk To The No. Quincy T 

3287464 




NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 



^J&ooyi - Girls 

3*y/ V 'Start Your Own 
Quincy Sun Paper Route' 

Call 471-3100 




Thursday, July 23, 1911 Qulney Sun Page 17 



Austin Powers Jr. Loop A.L. All-Stars, 17-4 



Steve Austin of Sears, who was 
named the American League's 
Most Valuable Player, had a 
fantastic night with two three-run 
homers, a single, a walk and four 
runs scored to lead the American 
League to an easy 1 7-4 victory over 
the Nationals in the annual Junior 
Baseball League all-star game. 

Bob Laracy, the American's 
starting pitcher, was the winner 
and also drove in a run with a long 
double that just missed going out 



of the park. Jamie McArdle, the 
fastest man in the league, had two 
hits and scored twice. Kyle 
Robertson caught a fine game, 
walked three times and scored 
three runs, Chris Marshall had a 
double and walked twice and 
scored twice, in addition to 
pitching two strong innings. Jay 
DeBartolo had a double after 
being hit in the face by a pitch in 
the first inning. Tommy Logan had 
a two-run double and also nitrheri 



two strong innings and Tom Reilly 
drove in a run with a single. Dennis 
DeCoste made the play of the 
game to end the game with a back 
to the plate running catch of a foul 
ball and he doubled the runner off 
second base. 

Chad Hallet was named the 
National League's MVP and he 
had a long two-run homer and a 
double. Bobby Fitzgerald had a 
double and scored on Hallet s 
homer, then reached on an error 



and scored on Hallet's double, 
Jack Kilrain had two singles and 
Steve Minichiello, Tad Sheets, 
Rick Nabstedt, Brett Heeney and 
Joe Innello had singles, Billy 
Burkhead had a long triple and 
scored a run. Amal Abouzeid, 
Larry Taglieri, Dan Santry, Mark 
Bilton and Shawn Mullen all 
played well. 

The National League pitchers 
gave up 13 walks, struck out 10 and 
gave up II hits over the nine- 



inning route, while the American 
hurlders struck out nine and 
walked five. 

Tom Mullaney did a fine job as 
public address announcer. The 
game was played at the end of the 
season and before the playoffs to 
allow the players on teams that did 
not make the playoffs participate. 
All the players had to play at least 
three innings and the pitchers 
could work no more than two 
innings each. 



THANK YOU QUINCY! 



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SO ADAMS STREET QUINCY 



472-4520 



/ P«|e IS Quincy Sun Thursday, July 23, 1981 



In Finland, Sweden 

Quincy Man Plays In 
World Class Competition 



Bow To Braintree 



Brian Donovan, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. John J. Donovan Jr. of 8 
Ruggles St., Quincy Point, a 
freshman at St. Joseph's College 
in Maine, has returned from a 
two-week trip to Finland and 
Sweden with the St. Joseph's 
varsity basketball team, which 
played six games with teams 
representing the Sports Federa- 
tion of Finland and Sweden. 

The trip was sanctioned by the 
NCAA and NAIA and gave 
Donovan, a 1980 graduate of 
Quincy High, and his teammates 
the opportunity to play in world 
class competition. Several of the 
teams played against are trying 
out for the Olympics. 

Donovan was a three-year 
varsity starter at Quincy and 
received a full basketball scholar- 
ship to St. Joseph's, which this 
past season enjoyed its most 
successful season (19-9). 

He was an all-scholastic, a two- 



time Suburban League all-star 
and a state coaches' all-star. 

He began his career at 8 years 
of age with St. Joseph's YMCA 
League team coached by Ray 
Dunn and Dick Travers. He has 
been a member of every all-star 
team for his league since that 
time. 

Brian underwent serious 
surgery on his right ankle last 
September and a complete 
rebuilding of the ankle was 
accomplished by sports medicine 
specialists. He came back strong 
to become a member of the 
varsity team after being immobile 
for several weeks and then on 
crutches. 

Brian feels his most memorable 
accomplishment in high school 
was scoring 30 points against 
Cambridge Rindge and Latin 
while he also covered 
Cambridge's 7-foot center, Pat 
Ewing. 



Hot Shot Competition 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department will again co-sponsor 
the Pepsi-Cola National 
Basketball Association Hot Shot 
Program. 

Located on the city's 
playgrounds, the event will be held 
in cooperation with the Boston 
Celtics and the Pepsi-Cola 
Bottling Company of Milton. 

The object of Hot Shots is to 
score as many points as possible 
within a one minute time limit as 
the player shoots from different 



Hot Spots designated on the court. 

Speed, shooting, dribbling and 
rebounding ability of the 
youngsters are tested in the 
competition, which is open to 
children between the ages of 9-18. 
Playground competitions are 
currently being held, with the 
winners moving up to district and 
city finals. Prizes and awards for 
youngsters taking part will include 
colorful Hot Shot patches, trips to 
the N.B.A. cities as well as 
certificates of achievement. 



LAS VEGAS NIGHT 

Saturday, July 25, 1981 

7:30p.m. to 12:30a.m. 

Sponsored by Randolph Babe Ruth 

Randolph Knights of Columbus 
Teed Drive 

Air Conditioned Hall 
Cash Door Prizes Admission $2.00 

Free Refreshments Bar available 

All Proceeds To Benefit Randolph Babe Ruth 




Quincy Babe Ruth 
All Stars Eliminated 



Quincy's American League All- 
Stars, coached by Dave 
MacMillan, Ray Dunn and Andy 
Oriola. won five games in a row 
after an opening day defeat to 
reach the district finals in the state 
Babe Ruth League tournament, 
but bowed to Braintree, 4-2, last 
Friday in the finals. 

Braintree now advances to the 
state finals beginning Friday in 
Foxboro. 

Following a 6-5 loss to 
Weymouth North, Quincy's 
American League stars started 
their five-game win streak with a 4- 
1 decision over South Boston. 
Chris Bunker pitched a three- 
hitter, struck out seven and walked 
six. The game was tied, I -I, going 
into the final inning when Quincy 
scored three runs. The first two 
batters reached on an error and a 
walk. Bill Cahill bunted them 
along and Mike Miller hit a two- 
run double. Bunker singled in 
Miller, Quincy was held to four 
hits, the only other hits being a 
double by Frank Reynolds and a 
single by Joe Conti. Bunker 
picked three runners off first base. 

Quincy then overwhelmed 
Hingham, 12-0, behind Mike 
Bourikas' three-hitter and a 13-hit 
attack. Bourikas struck out nine 
and walked three, striking out the 
last seven batters. 

Quincy broke fast with six runs 
in the opening inning on six hits 
and three walks. The hits were by 



Miller, Jeff Timberlake, Bunker, 
Brian Gibbons, Keith Smith and 
Bourikas. Steve Hogan, Dan 
Cuervelsand Miller walked. In the 
third Timberlake had a two-run 
double as did Hogan. Mike Gill 
caught a strong game to help 
Bourikas to his shutoyt. 

Next came a 9-3 victory over 
Weymouth South as Bunker 
pitched a four-hitter. The game 
was close until the seventh when 
Quincy erupted for five runs. 
Quincy opened with two runs in 
the first on singles by Miller and 
Bunker and two errors. Weymouth 
scored a run in the third and took a 
3-2 lead with two runs in the 
fourth. Quincy regained the lead 
with two runs in the fifth on an 
error, Cuervels' single, a fielder's 
choice and singles by Timberlake 
and Gibbons. In the big seventh 
Miller walked, Bunker and 
Gibbons singled, Smith walked 
and Reynolds wrapped it up with a 
three-run homer. 

Quincy completely outclassed 
Scituate, 26-0, pounding out 23 
hits and scoring 10 runs in the first 
inning and nine in the seventh. 
Bourikas pitched a two-hitter and 
struck out 1 1. 

Miller had four singles and a 
walk, Mike Malloy two singles, a 
walk and two stolen bases, 
Timberlake two singles, a grand 
slam homer and six RBI; Bunker 
two singles, a double, a triple and 
two RBI; Gibbons five for five, 
including two triples and six RBI: 



Reynolds a single, double,, walk 
and two RBI; Cuervels a three- 
run homer, Jim McPartlin a 
perfect squeeze bunt for a run in 
the first; Smith two for two and an 
RBI; and Conti, on base six times 
with three singles and three walks. 

Quincy then squeezed by Cedar 
Grove, 2-1, with Bunker edging 
John Munro in an extra-inning 
duel. Quincy pushed across the 
winning run in the eighth inning to 
advance to the district finals. Both 
pitchers allowed six hits as Bunker 
recorded his third tournament win. 

Cedar Grove took a 1-0 lead in 
the third on a walk, error and 
single, but Quincy tied it in the 
fourth on an error, a single by 
Gibbons and Smith's RBI single. 
Cedar Grove threatened to win it 
in the seventh. With two outs, a 
single and walk was followed by 
what looked like the game-winning 
hit but Quincy left fielder Malloy 
charged the ball and made a strong 
throw to the plate which held the 
runner at third. 

The next batter struck out and 
the game went into extra innings. 
Miller opened the eighth by 
reaching on an error and went all 
the way to third on Timberlake's 
bunt. The throw to third was wild 
and Miller scored the winning run. 

In the district finals Friday 
Braintree's Richie Stearns 
scattered six hits, Dan Mahoney 
drove in two runs with a double 
and Steve Kirby w:r 'v.o-for-two 
and drove in a run lo. Braintree. 



18 Track Club Members 
Qualify For National Meets 



The Quincy Track Club enjoyed 
one of its best weeks ever last week 
as 18 members qualified for 
national meets and several others 
may be notified soon that they 
have qualified. The QTCalso won 
19 gold medals in another meet. 

In the Arco Jesse Owens tryouts 
at Boston University 15 QTC 
members won all-expense paid 
trips to Los Angeles for the 
national meet Aug. I and 2. 

For Quincy in 10-11 boys Paul 
McLellan won the long jump, 
Robert McDonald the baseball 
throw, and the relay team of Mike 
Petta, Steve Shoap, Brendan 
Farrell and Bobby Roche won. 
Colleen Needle won the baseball 
throw in 10-1 1 girls. 

In 12-13 boys Finn Kelly won 
the high jump and Jamie McArdle 
the long jump and in 12-13 girls 
Tracy Parker won the high jump 
and Noreen Connolly the baseball 
throw. 

In 14-15 bovs Fred Bickford 



won the softball throw and in 14- 
15 girls Kristine Picarski won the 
100, Maureen Roche the long 
jump and Georgia Traficante the 
softball throw. 

Other medalists were Robbie 
Kearney, 10-11 50-yard dash; 
Corinne Radzevich, 10-11 long 
jump; the 10-11 relay team of 
Tricia Giannanadrea, Patty 
Feeney, Deirdre Murphy and 
Tracy Thornhill; Tracy Wilson, 
12-13 longjump; Don Fink, 14-15 
220; Jimmy Kennedy, 14-15 440, 
and John DeLappe, 14-15 high 
jump. 

Three QTC members competed 
in the Region I Junior Olympics in 
Scarborough, Maine, and all three 
qualified for the nationals in 
Winston-Salem, N.C., Aug. 6-10. 

Ron Farber won the discus and 
took third in the shot put, Lauren 
Andrews took second in the shot 
and third in the discus and 
Michelle Millane took second in 
the discus and third in the shot. 



Propane Gas 

Cylinders filled on our premises 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Charmglow gas grills & accessories 
Available at special low prices 

South Shore Heating 
and Air Conditioning Inc. 

38 Greenwood Ave. 
E. Weymouth 337-6100 



Boys and girls 15-18 from all 
over the Northeast took part and 
the top three finishers in each event 
earned the right to compete in the 
nationals. 

The QTC also had a big day last 
Saturday in the Hershey state meet 
in Braintree, winning 19 gold 
medals. This is the third straight 
year Quincy has scored the most 
points in the meet. 

In 9-10 boys Sean Munroe won 
the standing long jump, Tony 
Rungetta won the 50 and the relay 
team of Munroe, Paul McLellan, 
Rob Kearney and Mike Petta won. 
In 9-10 girls Colleen Needle won 
the softball throw and the relay 
team of Marta Martinez, Karen 
Cashman, Deirdre Murphy and 
Robin Guilfoy won. 

In 11-12 boys Jamie McArdle 
won the 100 and longjump, Finn 
Kelly won the 800 and the relay 
team of Stuart Coull, Mark 
Lunnin, McArdle and Mike 
Rugnetta won. In girls 1 1-12 Laura 
Coull won the 100. 

In girls 1 3- 14 Georgia Traficante 
won the softball throw. 

Other medalists were Mike 
Petta, 9-10 100; Cinday Bonner, 9- 
10 50; Fran Rodgers, 9-10. long 
jump; Mark Lunnin, 11-12 50; 
; Teresa Collings, 11-12 50; Nancy 
Sullivan, 11-12 880; Tracy Coull, 
13-14 220; Beth Tracy, 13-14 440; 
Shannon Gotter, 13-14 1500; 
Kristen Dever, 13-14 longjump, 
and the relay team of Dever, Coull, 
Geraldine Murphy and Denise 
Petta. 



CLASSES FOR MEN, WOMEN and CHILDREN 



SHAOLIN KENPO 
ARTS ASSOCIATION 

Edward M. Carey 

CHIEF INSTRUCTOR 

335-9629 

230 BRIDGE STREET 
ROUTE 3A, WEYMOUTH 



KARATE 




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INTRODUCTORY OFFER 



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MEN • WOMEN - CHILDREN OAVTIME A EVENING INSTRUCTION 



Thursday, July 2J, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 19 






At Lincoln Hancock Pool 

Swim-A-Thon For MDA 
Set For Aug. 6 



18 Residents Accepted At Bridgewater State 



The Lincoln Hancock 
Community School Council and 
Quincy-South Shore Jerry Lewis 
Telethon Committee are 
sponsoring a Swim-A-Thon 
Thursday, Aug. 6, 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
at the Lincoln Hancock pool. 

The event is being held in 
cooperation with the Quincy 
Recreation Department. 

Swimmers, who can be all ages, 
will obtain sponsors to pledge 
money per lap, with a 200 lap limit. 

Except for a mandatory five 
minute rest after one hour, 
swimmers will swim continuously. 

Jerry Lewis wristwatches will be 
given to the boy and girl who raise 
the most pledge money. 

Jerry Lewis visors will be given 
to everyone who turns in $25 or 
more. 

Every participant who turns in 
pledge money will receive a 
citationof merit from MDA. 

Deadline for turning in pledge 
money to be eligible for prizes is 
Friday, Aug. 21. 

Money should be turned in to 
The Quincy Sun office, 1372 
Hancock St., Quincy. 

Pledge forms and instructions 
are available at Quincy city 
playgrounds, swim stations, the 
Lincoln Hancock pool and The 

2 Residents 
Graduate From 

Bates College 

Two Quincy residents, Wayne 
B. Gardiner and Martin 
Levenson, were awarded degrees 
at the 115th Bates College 
commencement in Lewiston, Me. 

Gardiner, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Gardiner of 38 Riverside 
Ave., received a bachelor of 
science degree. He majored in 
geology. 

A 1977 graduate of Quincy 
High School, he was elected to 
the College Club, an honorary 
alumni service association. 

Gardiner spent his third year 
studying at the University College 
of Swansea (Wales) through 
Bates' Junior Year Abroad 
Program. 

Levenson, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Sumner Levenson of 47 Hilda St., 
received a bachelor of arts 
degree. He majored in political 
science. 

A dean's list student, he was a 
member of the Dean's Advisory 
Council and WRJR, the student- 
run radio station'. 

Active in athletics, Levenson 
made all-Maine in the 3000-meter 
event in winter track, and all-New 
England in the 10,000-meter 
event in spring track. 

Levenson, a 1977 graduate of 
North Quincy High School, spent 
his third year studying at the 
University of Lancaster (England) 
through Bates' Junior Year 
Abroad Program. 

Correction 

Paul Hussey finished first in the 
over-40 class in the recent 
Merrymount Association road 
race and not third as reported. 

Hussey finished in third place 
overall in 15:08. The overall 
winner was Matt Corbett in 14:58. 



Norfolk County 
Bar Association 

Lawyer reference service will 
help in selecting an attorney. 

If you need a lawyer and don't 
know one, call us and you will be 
referred to an attorney in your 
area who will talk to you for a 
nominal fee for the first visit. 

P. O. Box 66, Dedham, Mass. 

326-8699 

Call 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



Quincy Sun. 

Sun Publisher Henry Bosworth 
and Richard Koch, executive 
secretary of The Quincy Park- 
Recreation Board are co-chairmen 
of the Quincy-South Shore Jerry 
Lewis Telethon Committee. 

Co-chairmen of the swim-a- 
thon are Charles Alongi, Barry 
Welch, Nancy Joyce, Ronald 
lacobucci and Lucille Rusconi. 

Members are Joan Picard, 
Jeanne Giagrande, Harry and 
Anneli Johnson, Christine 
Rusconi and Geraldine Cardarelli. 

Members of the Lincoln 
Hancock Community School 
Council are: Ronald lacobucci, 
president; Anneli Johnson, vice 
president; Carol Pisano, secretary; 
Michael Jovanovic, treasurer; 
Beverly Goodwin, Joan Picard, 
Jeanne Giagrande, Marilyn Casey, 
Carol Sutterly, Lee Todd, Nancy 
Joyce, Joanne Vacca, Winifred 
Burchill, Jane McGuiness, and 
Mary Brelsford. 



Eighteen young men and 
women from Quincy have been 
accepted as students at Bridge- 
water State College and attended 
a recent orientation program prior 
to their enrollment in the fall. 

They are Mary Sue Moran, 110 
Piermont St.; Elizabeth Norton, 
65 Merrymount Rd.; Mark 
Donahoe, 16 Maiden St.; David 
Cheney, 1433 Furnace Brook 
Parkway; Scott Matthews, 20 
Northfield Ave.; Paul Andrews, 
22 Broadway. 

Susan Ohlson, 84 Pleasant St. 
Patricia Garrity, 18 Common St. 
Michelle Riggs, 230 West St. 
Margaret Croke, 17 Milton Rd. 
Lorna Nogeuira, 55 Botolph St.; 
Jacqueline Thayer, 39 Newbury 
Ave. 

Julie Minichiello, 88 Billings 
Rd.; Kathleen Butler, 149 Billings 
St.; Marc Litif, 128 Prospect 



Ave.; Kerry Kiley, 119 Crabtree 
Rd.; Patricia Gerry, 18 Prospect 



St.; Victoria Mucci, 126 Faxon 
Rd. 



:• 



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Loretta's 
DO-NUT SHOPPE 



GRAND OPENING 



t Reg. $2.25 
**Reg. $1.15 

Reg. $3.98 
Reg. $1.99 

** Reg. 62C 
Reg. 82C 



1 Doz. Donuts 
Half Doz. Donuts 




BRA-WEY ^ 
FLORIST *fc 

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Weymouth 

3370288 3370289 



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Half Doz. Muffins 



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Muffin & Coffee 



50C 

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Offer Expires July 26 

76 BILLINGS ROAD 

Mon. thru Sat. 6 - 6 

N. QUINCY Sundays- 1 3285322 

• • • 






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- - - - nwoiTi niin nwflftMu'ii u u . . 



bank to meet 
the challenges 

of the 80%. 



Even though the economy during 1980 was volatile and un- 
predictable, the South Boston Savings Bank, Massachusetts' 
highest earning savings bank, continued to grow. To see our 
strength, just look at our financial summary. 



FINANCIAL SUMMARY 



October 31 (millions) 



Assets 



% change 
1979 1978 1977 1976 1976-1980 

$459.2 $436.4 $399.0 $365.2 $325.6 +41.0% 



Deposits $421.3 $409.8 $373.4 $325.2 $295.3 +42.7% 

Mortgages and 

Mortgage-backed 

Securities $329 7 $315.3 $262.7 $245.6 $199.9 +64.9% 

Other 

Investments $123.1 $120.3 $123.7 $112.9 $118.3 + 4.1% 

Capital 

Accounts $24.2 $23.7 $21.6 $20.7 $17.7 +36.7% 

Operating 

Expenses $4.3 $4.6 $3.5 $3.0 $2.8 +53.6% 

Net Income* $5.7 S6.0 $5.7 $4.5 $3.4 +67.6% 

'Before Taxes 



^Z 



In 1980, interest paid depositors rose to a new high of 
$34.5 million. Assets increased 5.2% to $459 million. 
And deposits were up to 2.8% to $421.3 million. South 
Boston Savings Bank's growth continues, thanks to our 
depositors and their expanding needs. 
Assets comprised residential and commercial mortgage 
loans in Boston, the surrounding area, and across the 
country. Plus government, municipal and corporate 
securities and money market instruments. 
These assets give the South Boston Savings Bank the 
strength to meet the ongoing challenges of the 1980's. 
The record of growth and reliability South Boston Sav- 
ings Bank started in 1863 continues with our commit- 
ment to improve service to the public in the years ahead. 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

"ALWAYS THE LEADER" 



Main Office: 460 West Broadway 

South Boston, Tel. 268-2500 
NEPONSET CIRCLE • QUINCY 



Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 23, 1 91 1 



Arts/Entertainment 



Elks' Cerebral Palsy Outing 
Dedicated To George Fay 



Some 400 cerebral palsied 
children and adults, along with 
members of their families, 
attended the 22nd annual outing 
sponsored by the Quincy Lodge of 
Elks at the South Shore Twin 
Drive-In, Braintree. 

The outing was dedicated to 
the memory of the late George C. 
Fay, who had been chairman of the 
event since its inception, and 
whose dedication to CP children 
will long be remembered. 

Memorial plaques of apprecia- 
tion were presented by Joseph 
McArdlc. past exalted ruler of the 



Quincy Elks, and William Trifone. 
president of the South Shore 
Cerebral Palsy Association. 

Commemorative awards were 
received on behalf of the late Mr. 
Fay by his sisters. Mrs. Kay 
Connolly. Mrs. Agnes Corbin and 
Mrs. Margaret Cooper. 

Binky the Bear appeared at the 
outing, a band provided dancing 
and entertainment, and 
hamburgers, hot dogs, pi/za, ice 
cream, cake and tonic were 
enjoyed. 

The three-tiered cake was 
donated to Cerebral Palsy by 
Montilio's Bakery. 

Chairmen for the outing were 
Mike Sances of the Elks' CP 
committee; Fred Tomeo of the 
South Shore Twin Drive-In; and 
George White, advertising director 
of the Patriot Ledger. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATRE 



773-4600 



Wed. & Thurs. July 22-23 

FANTASY & ADVENTURE AS 
MORTALS CLASH WITH GODS 

"Clash of the Titans" (PG) 

Eve's 7:00 Only 




* 
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* 
* 

* 

* 
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60 DEVONSHIRE STREET 

Boston 
(One block from The 



onsatU 



:efin & JEFF 

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RDAYS 

OLDIES 

orite 1 



SHOl 



qu 



ests 



f r „«« tne i »_ 



WED. 



FRI- 



BOBBY 

Dicvine Your 



Favorite Dane 



Mu«»c 



* 

i 



P»«y»»« Y 8PMT02AM 

SERVING 

The Finest Luncheon and 
Dinner Specials 'til 9 P.M. 



* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
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■fc Dinner Specials 'til 9 P.M. )f 
£ PROPER DRESS REQUIRED i 




CHRISTINE HARDY, 12, of Houghs Neck, wound up her pitching arm to try and "dunk" Edward Bicari at 
a carnival recently at LaBrecque Field sponsored by the Houghs Neck Community Council. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dare Gillooly) 

Ticket Deadline Thursday For HN Center Trip 



Tickets must be paid for by 
today (Thursday) for the Houghs 
Neck Community Center's July 
30th trip to the South Shore Music 

Chicken Barbecue 

Houghs Neck Legion Post 
Home, 1116 Sea St., will host a 
chicken barbecue on Saturday at I 
p.m. 

Brian Young, junior vice 
commander, will be chef assisted 
by Commander John Christensen. 
Tickets will be available at the 
door. 



Circus to see Anthony Newley and 
Suzanne Somers. 

A bus will leave the center at 
6:45 p.m. the day of the show. 



Money for the bus can be paid 
the night of the sho'.v 

For more information, contact 
Patricia Ridlen at the center or call 
her at 471-8251 or 479-7682. 



e The Wizard Of Oz' At Caddy Park 



A free performance of "The 
Wizard of Oz" will be presented 
by the Stagemobile Monday, July 
27, at 11 a.m. at Caddy Park, 
Wollaston Beach. 

The Stagemobile is sponsored 



by the Metropolitan District 
Commission and operated by the 
Children's Theatre. 

It has offered live children's 
theatre for over 25 years. 



Boston )f 

(One block from The Quincy Market)^ 

Featuring the finest * 
in entertainment £ 




[SEEEmi 



Featuring 
the Finest In 
Mew England 

Cooking 



LUNCHEON 

II A.M. to4 P.M. 

DINNER 

4 P.M. to 10 P.M. 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

Bowling Banquets 

Retirement Parties Showers 

Weddings & Anniversaries 

Entertainment 

Nightly at the 

Fireside Lounge 

FOR RESERVATIONS 
Call 471 1623, 471 5540 




1514 HANCOCK ST.. QUINCY 



SAVE ON RECORDS 

TAPES-LUGGAGE 

SHEET MUSIC 

LEATHER GOODS & MORE 





Chinese Polynesian Food 
New Additional Luncheon 
Specials 11: 30 to 3 P.M. 
Dinner Specials 3 P.M. to 9 P.M. 
Banquet Facilities 
Cocktail Lounge 



TAKE OUT ORDERS 



ST CALL AHEAD FOR 

FAST SERVICE 

Banquet Facilities Available 



105 Sea St., Quincy 

TAKE OUT ORDERS 
\.. 471-2255 



Thursday, July 23, I9SI Quincy Sun Page 21 






By Warren Sattler 




Special Features 



STARSCOPE 



Clare AaMwdl 




Grandpa's Boy 



By Brad Anderson 




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WEEK OF: JULY 23 

AQUARIUS - January 21 February 19 

Conflict with Capricorn can be resolved — but tact Is crucial. Partner- 
ship ventures bring rewarding surprises If both parties are willing to put 
in a little overtime. 

PISCES - February 20 March 20 

You're slightly gullible; be prepared for some practical Jokers. Your 
best ideas may be met with cool reserve, while some random thoughts 
are greeted with applause. 

ARIES - March 2 1 April 20 

Important people figure into week's picture. Education is accented, 
and you may be filling the roles of teacher and student. Calculated risk 
pays off by Tuesday. 

TAURUS - April 21-May 22 

Short-cuts just don't pay, while a roundabout route gets you to your 
destination successfully — and includes extraordinary sights. Emo- 
tional fireworks spark — and almost immediately subside. 

GEMINI - May 23-June 21 

Unless you're willing to compromise, a domestic dispute can get out 
of hand. Good week for launching fitness program, learning a new 
sport or taking on part-time work. 

CANCER - June 22 July 22 

Social gathering can bring you in touch with an important business 
contact. A more conservative approach proves helpful at work. Old 
debts should be collected quickly. 

LEO - July 23 August 22 

Taurus or Libra can brighten the friendship picture — but don't con- 
fuse friendship with romance. Older friends may need a boost of con- 
fidence which only you can provide. 

VIRGO - Auguat 23 September 22 

A transition week. Perhaps you're between jobs ... or between 
friendships. In either case, use your time positively and don't hesitate 
to contact people in high places. 

LIBRA - September 23-October 22 

A dip in self-confidence ends when you're called on to meet a key 
challenge. Thursday-Saturday favor business transactions, with the 
accent on trading and advertising. 

SCORPIO - October 23 November 21 

Week has a sentimental appeal, highlighted by a note or call from a 
long-distance friend. Check all facts with diligence, especially If they 
relate to real estate or Investments. 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22-December 22 

A picture's worth a thousand words, so put your ideas across in a 
visual manner. Don't dismiss a co-worker's strange ideas. Weekend is 
wonderful for bargain-hunting Sagittarians. 

CAPRICORN - December 23 January 20 

Strikes and other delays can impede progress, but love life is on a 
' steady course. Good week for organizing your ideas, arranging 
priorities and hosting cozy dinners. 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

A bom romantic, a born actor, a born leader. But vanity is also in youi 
blood, and sometimes you just refuse to relinquish the limelight. In the 
coming months, productive times are broken by restrictive forces, so 
seize the moments when they come. 

BORN THIS WEEK 

July 23rd, poet John Maxwell; 24th, actress, Ruth Buzzi; 25th, 
painter Louis d'Anjou; 26th, singer Mick Jagger; 27th, producer Nor- 
man Lear; 28th, actor Michael Wilding; 29th, actor William Powell. 



IT JUST SO HAPPENED 



TSfe CHICKEN 1$ ONE 0F7HG 
MOST ABUNDANT &/RD* W 
7NE WORLD, 
IV/TNAN 
ESTIMATED 
POPULATION 
^/ P OF 3 BILLION f 




by Kern f 

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see ovs 'nki \/iu>x>e. 

DRIVE Rft.ST7 




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'^■■'•' ^ COeMieS N. MEXICO. 



FRAMED 

"LVRSTNE 

First woman cabinet 

member in tne us. 

SV£ U/aS S£C. 0FL/93OR 
FROM 1933- 1945/ 




MRPS S MEMNGS 



Crossword 



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, , By D. J. Coates 

Unmix the letters in the boxes to form a 
word. Then circle A, B or C for the cor- 
rect meaning (or definition). M-* 
Score yourself as follows : 

4 Correct-Excellent 2 Correct-Fair 

3 Correct-Good 1-0 Correct-Poor 




L 


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CLUEi In a nursery song the farmer lived here. 



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CLUE: Scientists track rocKets in space . 



3. 



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ANIMAL 
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5. 
9. 

10, 
12. 
14. 

15 
16 
17 
18. 

20. 

21. 
22. 
24. 
26. 

28. 



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Water 

barricades 

Skin disease 

Giant 

A nobleman 

Doubt 

Chinese 

pagoda 

Arab garment ?e 

1 ' 'hite yams 

ib 
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sl( N\ I 

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p- nt 

.icing point 
Taste 
Parent 
Lamb's 



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31 
33 
36 

37 
39 
40 
41. 
43. 



46. 
47. 



pen name 
Neither 



Wings 
Prefix, away 
Girls' name 
Household 
God 
State 
Put on 
Either 
Stupidity 
Exit 
Allot 
Weird 
Look at 
DOWN 

Vanish 
Siamese coin 
Japanese ship 
Treats 
with scorn 
Performs 
Kind of 
lettuce 






K1HF HelKH EHH 

BHSfl E3 BEEn 

SSuT fiDES 



BBSB BE SHOE 

mpin sEasi Ban 



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CLUE i End of a war. 



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Greek letter 

Main course 

Leg bone 

Domesticater 

Bulk 

13. Appear 

17. Goddess 

of beauty 

Only 

Short jacket 

Musical note 

Atop 

Counsel 

Medicinal 

plant 

Huge 

Even: poetic 

Routine 

Some 

U. S. holly 

Edges 

Chalice veil 

Bom 

Note of scale 



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8 

9 

11 

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21. 
23. 
25. 
27. 
29. 

30. 

32. 

34. 

35. 

37. 

38 

41. 

42. 



Ptje 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 23, 1981 



RECREATION 
ROUNDUP 



Baker Beach | Karl J. Weaver]: 
On Wednesday. Baker Beach 
played Quarterdeck in baseball. 
Baker Beach put up an impressive 
fourth inning but eventually 
surrendered to Quarterdeck, 
14-0. Baker Beach had one hit by 
Shawn Flavin, who also pitched a 
5-hit game. Eddie Flavin played 
flawlessly at shortstop and he hit 
the ball with real authority. 
Shawn Mullen was the catcher 
and held most of the hitters from 
advancing further. Joey Thurston 
made impressive throws from 
right field to hold two runs at the 
bag. Dan Reagan played second 
and reached once on a base on 
balls. In summary, the Baker 
Beach kids had a good first game. 
They executed many plays and 
showed that they have good 
potential. 

Baker Beach has been holding 
the familiar Junior Olympics. 
This competition has many boys 
and girls from Baker Beach 
competing for beach winner. This 
exciting event includes the 440 
run and various dashes. It also 
includes the long jump topped off 
by the softball throw. The 
winners of the boys softball 
throws were: Midgets, Joey 
Thurston; juniors, Eddie Flavin; 
and seniors. Ken Maher. The 
winner for the midgets in the 
girls' softball throw was Lisa 
Connelly and for the juniors was 
Susan Stanton. 

Chapel [Cheryl Carmody]: The 
recreation season started out 
great at Chapel Park with all of 
the neighborhood kids signing 
up. Whiffleball quickly became 
the favorite game at Chapel, and 
Jeff Craig and Dean Aiguier 
proved to be the best players. 
Everyone is practicing hard for 
the Special Event Whiffleball 
Tournament. 

Arts and crafts and archery are 
other favorites at the Park. Lynn 
Rimovitz and Natalie Lutchman 
made beautiful God's Eyes with 
the specialist. At archery, Chad 
Hallet, Lisa Steen, and Ricky 
Smith all hit the target at least 
once. 

Last week. Chapel Park lost a 
close game to LeBreque at Junior 
Girls' softball. Denise DeCoste 
and Cathy Brill played excellent 
defense for Chapel, while 
Michelle Smith and Stacy 
Bersanti supplied the offensive 
power. Nicole Lutchman, playing 

LEGAL NOTICE 



her first game ever was 
outstanding! 

Karen Lutchman proved to be a 
great racquetball player at the 
Playoff Club in Braintree. Her 
athletic abilities also shone 
through at the District Three 
Junior Olympics where she came 
very close to winning her events. 
Tina Rimovitz, Chris Nichol and 
Billy Rimovitz also represented 
Chapel well in their events. 

Heron Rd [Dan Boyle]: Heron 
Rd. may not have any baseball, 
basketball or softball teams, but it 
does have the best kickball and 
checker teams going. It is the 
relay-race capital of the world!! 
Some of the top news was the 
great God's Eyes*that were made 
by all of the kids. Mary Kelly, 
Karen Flaherty, Deanna Nigro, 
Shannon and Kerry Evans, Brian, 
Billy and Beth Bellew, Danny 
McGinn and Mike and John 
Johnston are some of the top 
participants in all of the activities. 
Another fun thing was all of the 
whiffleball games. The trip to the 
Racquetball Club in Braintree 
was the week's top story. All of 
the kids enjoyed it. Billy and 
Brian Bellew, Mike and John 
Johnston, Paul Hutchinson, Dan 
McGinn, Deanna Nigro, Suzanne 
and Maureen Shea all displayed 
great talent on the court, and also 
excellent behavior on the trip. 
The hot dogs and coke were very 
enjoyable and the whole day was 
a total success. 

LaBreque [Kathy Carmody and 
Fran Donovan]: LaBreque began 
its summer program with a boom, 
with over 140 kids signing up. In 
the second day of recreation, the 
junior girls' softball team had a 
scrimmage with Chapel and beat 
them, 9-2. Chris Loud and Nora 
Joyce each went three for three. 
In the Junior boys baseball game 
against Perkins, Kyle Robertson 
struck out ten batters and was the 
winning pitcher. Steve Austin and 
Tom Logan hit the ball well 
getting two hits apiece. The 
Junior Girls' softball team played 
and beat Chapel again. Kristen 
Hardy played and had a home run 
and all around had an excellent 
game! Joey Devlin led his midget 
baseball team to a victory against 
Perkins as he struck out 13 
batters. The final score was 16-2. 

What do you do when the heat 
becomes unbearable? LaBreque 
found a quick solution - WATER 

LEGAL NOTICE 



INVITATION I OR BIDS 

CITY 01 QUINCY. MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

QUINCY CITY HALL 

1305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering to the City of 
Quincy: 

School Dept. Masking and Transparent Aug. 3, 1981 at 10:00 A. M. 

Tape 
Seienee Equipment and Aug. 3, 1981 at 10:30 A. M. 

Supplies (Q.J.C.) 
Athletie Supplies & 

Kquipment 
Culinary Arts Small 

Wares 
Restaurant Paper & 

Aluminum Products 
Non-Perishable I ood- 

stuffs 
Custom Data Processing 

Forms 

Hospital Dept. Housekeeping Kquipment Aug. 3, 1981 at 1 1:00 A. M. 

Police Dept. Time Generator/Reader Aug. 4, 1981 at 9:30 A.M. 

Sewer Dept. Concrete Pipe Aug. 4, 1981 at 10:00 A. M. 

Barrel! Blocks, Cement Aug. 4, 1981 at 10:30 A. M. 

Bricks 
Vitrified Clay Pine Aug. 4, 1981 at I 1 :00 A. M. 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing Agent, 
Ouincj City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any. the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. 

I irm bid prices will be given iirsi consideration and will be received at the 
office >>l the Purchasing Agent until the time and dale slated above, at winch 
lime and date they will be publicly opened and read. 

Bids must be in a scaled envelope. The outside of the sealed envelope is to 
be deai I) marked, "BID I NCI < >SI l>" with time dale of bid tall 

I ,! '. righl d tu reject an) or all bids or to accept an) part of a bid 

oi the one deemed best tor the City . 

Arthur II. I r>bin, M. 
William J. Kelly, Purchasing \ nl 
7 23/81 



Aug. 18, 1981 at 10:00 A. M. 
Aug. 19. 1981 at 9:30 A. M. 
Aug. 19, I9S1 at 10:00 A. M. 
Aug. 19, 1981 at 10:30 A. M. 
Aug. 19, 1981 at 11:00 A. M. 



FIGHTS!!! Peggy McMillen 
began the war and Skeeta 
Callahan was quick to join in. 
Hank Miller was drenched from 
head to toe as he was held down 
and soaked. It seems as if 
everyone was wet except leader 
Fran Donovan. Watch Out!!! 

Perkins [Stacey Lynch and Dan 
Molloy]: Opening day at Perkins 
Field was a big success! Over 75 
kids signed up. Since then, many 
thing have been happening at 
Perkins. Jeff Pugliese still holds 
the title as the checkers champ, 
but Marty Tolson is trying awfully 
hard to steal it away from Jeff! 

In archery, Mary McManus hit 
the bull's-eye on her first try! ! 1 

The winners for Junior 
Olympics from Perkins were 
Midgets, Teresa Noenickx, 
Michelle Thackery, Laura Iorio, 
Matt Collins, Paula Tolson, Terry 
Hack, Kerry Tolson and John 
Grennon; juniors, Maureen 
Tolson, Chris Holland, David 
Maimaron; seniors, Ann Marie 

LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81 1 1864121 

Notice of Appointment 

To' all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES BROWNLIE late of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that SOUTH SHORE BANK of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executor named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/19/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. LORD, 
Esquire, first Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Ninth day of July in the 
Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/9-16-23/81 

COMMONWEALTH OI 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Trial Court of 

Massachusetts 

East Norfolk Division 

Civil Docket No. 40812 

At the District Court of East 
Norfolk, holden at Quincy, within 
the County of Norfolk for civil 
business, on the eighth day of July, 
A.D., 1981. 

FREDERICK W. G1LMORE, 
Plaintiff vs. JESSE ROSE, 
Defendant. 

This is an action of a Petition to 
Enforce Lien and I or Storage and 
Cost of Motor Vehicle against the 
defendant Jesse Rose, as set forth in 
the Plaintiffs Complaint dated Julv 
6, 1981. 

And it appearing to the Court by 
the suggestion of the Plaintiff and on 
inspection of the officer's return on 
the plaintiffs summons, that no 
personal service of said complaint has 
been made upon the defendant Jesse 
Rose. 

IT IS ORDERED BY THE 
COURT, here, that the Plaintiff give 
notice to the defendant JESSE 
ROSE, of the pendency of this 
action, and to appear before the 
Court, on the thirty-first day of 
August, 1981, to answer to the same, 
by causing an attested copy of this 
order to be published in the Quincy 
Sun, a newspaper published in 
Quincy, Massaehusetts, once a week, 
three weeks successively; and that 
this action be continued to the 
thirty-first day ol Aurust. 1981. or 
until notice shall be given to the 
Defendant Jesse Rose agreeably to 
this older. 

JAMI S I. I Ol K\ . JK. (T.I RK 
A 1 rue Cup) Attest. 

John Dal ton 
Assistant Clerk- Ma: 1 is! rate 
7/16-23-30/81 



Noenickx. Paul Canavaghn, Mi- 
Mi Connolly, A. J. Pugliese, and 
Diane Costigliola. Go Perkins!!! 

Arts and Crafts is very popular. 
Cathy O'Brien drew a beautiful 
picture of Willy Water Bug, and 
Chrissey and Kelly Ross drew a 
crazy picture of their recreation 
leader. 

The Junior girls' softball team 

LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OE 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81F1896E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CESAREO PENA late of 
Quincy, in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned mattti of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that MARIA CUMMING of Braintree 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executrix named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

I lyou desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/26/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. EORD, 
Esquire, lirst Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Ninth day of July in the 
Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/23-30 8/6/81 

COMMONWEALTH Ol 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81M1084-D1 

CATHERINE BRUND1GE 

Plaintiff vs. RICHARD ROSS 
BRUNDIGE Defendant. Summons 
by Publication. 

To the above-named Defendant: 

A complaint has been presented to 
this Court by your spouse, Catherine 
Brundige, seeking a divorce for cruel 
and abusive treatment. 

You are required to serve upon 
Nancy Lorenz, plaintiffs attorney, 
whose address is Greater Boston 
Legal Services 85 Devonshire St., 
Boston, your answer on or before the 
14th day of October, 1981. If you 
fail to do so, the Court will proceed 
to the hearing and adjudication of 
this action. You are also required to 
tile a copy of your answer in the 
office of the Register of this Court at 
Dedham, Norfolk Probate Court. 

Witness, ROBERT M. I ORD, 
Esq., first Judge of said Court at 
Dedham. Julv 15, 1981 . 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/23-30 8/6/81 

COMMONWEALTH OI 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81IT816F1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CALOGERO GAZIANO 
also known as CHARLES GAZIANO 
late of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
thai ANTHONY M. GAZIANO of 
Medford in the County of Middlesex 
be appointed Executor named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

It you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/12/81 

Witness, ROBERT M. I ORD, 
Esquire, I irst Judge ol said Court at 
Dedham. the twenty -ninth ijay of 
June m the Year of OU1 Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and 
I I. ht\ one, 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/9-16-23 81 



is going to make a big come back 
after losing their first game to 
LaBreque. 

The boys on the Park are 
anxiously awaiting the start of the 
whiffleball world series. .. 

LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OE 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81F1900E1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CECELIA M. MERRILEES 
Also Known As MARGARET C. 
MERILEES, CECELIA M. 

MERRILESS and MARGARET C. 
MERRILESS late of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that CATHERINE S. NEUMEYER of 
Orange Park, Florida be appointed 
Executrix named in the will without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/26/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. I ORD, 
Esquire, lirst Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Ninth day of July in the 
Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/23-30 8/6/81 

COMMONWEALTH Ol 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 80 106 36 El 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOSEPH W. SMITH, late of 
Quincy, in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that JOHN N. KALLIS of Canton in 
the County of Norfolk be appointed 
Executor named in the will without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/26/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. I ORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Seventh day of July in 
the Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/16-23-30/81 

COMMONWEALTH Ol 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81 1 1584K 1 

Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of RUTH H. NICKERSON late 
of Quincy, in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will and codicil of said 
deceased praying that SARAH 
THORN COUCH of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
Executrix named in the will without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or bet ore ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/19/81. 

Witness. ROBERT M. I ORD, 
I squire, I trst Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Seventh day ol Inly in 
the Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and ' : y-anc. 

THOMAS I tTRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/23-30 8/6 SI 



Thursday, July 23, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 23 



IS^ CLflSSIFIEDUDS! 



HELP WANTED 



FOR RENT 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



Part Time 

Earn $5-10 hourly servicing our 
customers from home on your 
telephone. 924-7450. 

7/30 



FOR SALE 

75 Suzuki GT550 

Black, Excellent Running 
Condition. $1,000. 
479-5211 after 6:00. 

7 23 

Waterbeds 

New Queen or King Size Waterbed, 
never opened, 10 year waranty, 
walnut stained pine frame, 
headboard, deck, pedestal, 
mattress, liner, heater. Originally 
$330.00, now $199.00. 828-1662, 
Canton. 

8'20 

Dutchmaid 

Quality clothing for the entire 
family. 10% off all underwear 
orders. For the month of July only. 
Party plan or individual orders. 
Call Clemie Brill 479-6538. 

7/30 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Miracle Of The Wood 

DMSO 
(organic) 

Distributed by St. Marks Inc. 464 
Granite Ave., Milton, Mass. 617- 
698-0223. 7/30 

PERSONALS 

"A MESSAGE 
For Jehovah's Witnesses" 

Are you a Jehovah's Witness with 
questions? We may have the 
answers for you. Call 843-1836. 
New message weekly. 

7/23. 

WANTED 



Air Conditioners & 
Refrigerators Wanted 

Will pay you $10.00 cash for your 
air cond. or refrig. I960 and up. 
471-5153 after 7:00 p.m. 

7/23 

American Host 
Families Wanted 

American families wanted, to room 

and board select international 

students. Screening and 

supervision guaranteed. Min. 

Length of stay 4 mos. Please reply: 

TOM CUNN1FF 

S.P.S. Language Center 

883 Boylston St. 

Boston, MA 021 16 (262-0383) 

7 tO 



Nancy's Nook 
537 Sea Street 

(2 minutes from Police Station) 
We are looking for 
children's and women's 
clothing in excellent 

condition, also cribs, 

portacribs, carriages, strollers, 
umbrella strollers, dressing 
tables, high chairs, playpens, 
etc. 

Arts & Crafts, small 
furniture, such as tables, 
chairs, desks, etc. Turn your 
articles into cash by bringing 
them in for consignment. 

Closed for vacation from 
July 18th through July 29th. 
Fall clothing being accepted 
now. 

Quincy 472-9433 



NEWSCARRIERS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



Cottages For 
Rent 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore. Housekeeping 
cottages. Studio and 3- 
room available. Weekly 
rentals $165 to $200. 
Private beach. Tennis 
available. Call 328-1300, 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

IK 

INSTRUCTION 



JAY'S 

TREE REMOVAL 

DONE BY TRAINED 
EXPERIENCED PERSONNEL 
Free Estimates 

LOW Fully lmured 

low' 

RATES 

CALL AFTER 4 P.M! 

843-6115 




Reading Tutoring 

Reading tutoring and SAT prep, 
verbal only. Jr. -Senior high schoo, 
Jr. college level. Certified specialist, 
references available. Call Peggy 
Buck, 471-4279. 
8/6 

Guitar Lessons 

By professional guitarist and 
teacher. All sivIcn. all ages. 773- 
35X8. 

7 t() 

Music Lessons 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 

BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER 

27 Beale St., Wollaston 

Call 773-5325 

SERVICES OFFERED 



Gordon 

Air Conditioning & 

Refrigeration 

Specializing in Residential Repair 
471-5153 after 6 p.m. 

7/23 

John J. Donovan 

Plumbing, Heating & 

Gas Fitting 

Specializing 
in Bathroom Remolding, gas & oil 
heating systems. Boiler & Hot 
water heater. Replacements. 
Emergency Repairs. Master Lie. # 
8617. 328-5675. 7 .to 

Larry's 
Home Repair 

Interior - exterior painting, scroll 
ceilings, gutters, roof repairs, and 
property maintenance. 328-8735, 
659-7471. 

Rainbow Painters 

Interior Exterior 

Painting Free Est. 

Old Fashioned Quality 

328-7266 328-6323 

7/23 



BOB'S ODD JOBS 

Rubbish Removal 

Hauling a Moving 

Landscaping 

Interior/Exterior Painting 

Ganeral Home Maintenance 

& Repairs 

Many other services 

Free Estimates Very Reasonable 

472-0868 Nights S Weekends 



Professional 

Shrub & Hedge 

Pruning 

Free estimates, 
satisfaction guaran- 
teed. 
DAN 773-2198. 



8/6 



Housepainting 

Two experienced college students 

looking for summer work painting 

houses, interior and exterior. 

Quality work at very reasonable 

rates. 

For free estimate, please call Matt. 

773-6833. eves. 7/23 

John's Appliances 
Service & Repair 

Refrigerators, freezers, air 
conditioners, electric stoves & 
electric dryers. Reasonable prices. 
Call John 328-7745. 7/23 



MOORE'S PAINTING 

INTERIOR -EXTERIOR 

FREE ESTIMATES 

High Quality - Low Cost 

College Student /ears ot experience 

Call Rory - 925-2419 after 5 p.m. 



Keys Made 

Locksmith on Dut; 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

86 Washington St., Quincy 
479-5454 



T.F. 



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Wollaston Fuel & Burner Service 



WE SERVICE 

Oil Burners 
Oil Heating Systems 
Gas Heating Systems 
All Motor & Controls 
All Hot Water Problems 

773-3443 



WE INSTALL 

Oil Burners 

Oil Fired Boilers 

Gas Fired Boilers 

Enertrol-Computor 

Energy Savings - Vent Damper 
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Enertol . JfJJ , /24 

Dealer Jerry i - a ^ amme ' 



42 ST. ANN'S ROAD 

HAVING YOUR OIL BURNER CLEANED NOW WILL SAVE 

YOU MONEY THIS WINTER - ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



Atlantic 

CARPET « UPHOLSTEP.V CLEANING SPECIALISTS 




CARPETS and UPHOLSTERY 
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• KCK UP A DELIVERY 



WATER DAMAGE 

FREE ESTIMATES 

471-3142 



walter j. mclean 



GLASS WORK 

Table tops - plexiglas tinted & clear. 
Mirrors installed clear and 
goldvein. Screens, storm windows 
& sashes repaired. 7 days. Call 328- 
7 1 32 or 426-7989. Gene. 

7/23 



Hall For Hire 

Weddings, showers, meetings, 
banquets. Elks Home. 1220 
Hancock St., Quincy. 

472-2223 t.f. 



Reliable Floor Service 

Hardwood floor sanding. 
Specialists since 1962. Poly- 
Urethane. Free Est. 335-5509. 8/13 



A&T VACUUM 

Repair Specialists On All Makes 

• FREE Pickup, 
Delivery, Estimates 

• Belts, Bags, Hoses all vacs 

• New, used. Rebuilt vacs 

• $9.95 special 
(General overhaul) 
only on carry in 
service with Aa 

• Electrolux Bags N., 

(14 Pkg$4.29- 5 Pkg$l.59) 
25 Beale St. Wollaston - 479-5066 
357A Wash. St. Bnjintree- 848-A476 

T.F. 




£ 



Your South Shore 

Headquarters 

For 

Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE A APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St., So Quincy 

472-1710 T.F. 




TREES and STUMPS 
REMOVED 

Free estimates/ references. Call Tim 
O'Brien 269-2025. 

8/I3 



HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a basic 
Homeowner's policy for $30,000 
and are paying more than $148. 00 a 
year. Call 479-4242 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency. T.F. 



Hall For Rent 

North Quincy K of C. Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. For information please 

ca " 328-0087 



T.F. 



"Tunerville Trolley" 

(ONE-MAN BAND) 

Yesteryear's answer for music and 
entertainment and your extra- 
special occasions. Call 773-3588. 

M 

Eager Beaver 

Tree Service 

Experience At 

Low Rates 

Pruning - Cutting - Removal. Lots 
cleared. Free estimates. Serving 
South Shore area. Call Cliff at 767- 
0359. 7/l6 



Insulate Yourself 

We have a trailer of Cellulose Class 
I available. Rent blower or pour in 
place. THE DR Insulation Co., 600 
Southern Artery, Quincy, next to 
Duane's. 471-5777 

9/30 



INDEX FOR 
CLASSIFIED 

CHECK ONE 

□ Services 
D For Sale 

□ Autos 
D Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Pets, Livestock 
D Lost and Found 

D Real Estate for Sale 
D Real Estate Wanted 
D Miscellaneous 
D Work Wanted 
D Antiques 
D Coins and Stamps 

□ Rest Homes 

□ Instruction 




MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
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Pagr 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 23, 1981 



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The proposal also will raise 
local bus fares from 25 cents to 50 
cents for the first six miles and by 
25 cents for each three miles 
thereafter. The maximum bus 
fare would be $1.75. 

Grace Coleman of Hull, a 
member of the MBTA's advisory 
board, noted that a commuter 
from Hull would pay 50 cents for a 
bus to Hingham, $1 for a second 
bus to Quincy. and $1.50 on the 
Red Line to Boston. 

"Don't you think," she asked, 
" that $6 is a lot to pay to go to and 
from work?" 

O'Lcary allowed that it was, 
adding the MBTA is going to 
create a special $4.75 round trip 
rate for Hull. 

Sen. Paul D. Harold noted that 
the MBTA increased fares from 
25 cents to 50 cents only a year 
ago. 

"We made certain suggestions 
at the fare hearings a year ago," 
he said. "I'm sorry to see that 
they were not taken into 
consideration. I want to record 
myself in opposition to this 
increase." 

Robert Gibbons, speaking for 
Rep. Thomas F. Brownell, made a 
pitch to have the fare at the new 
Quincy Adams station $2.25 and 
Quincy Center $1.50 for a round 
trip. 

"Quincy is burdened by an 
unfair transit poliey," he said. 

Jim Devlin of Quincy, who 
described himself is i parttime 
rider for a transit magazine, 
excoriated the "stupid, inefficient 
union work rules" and "idiot 
repairmen making $50,000 a year 
with overtime." 

O'Leary told him that the 
MBTA is making "a strong effort 
to upgrade its maintenance 
program" and is receiving a high 
degree of cooperation from the 
unions. 

Alice Borden of Quincy taunted 
the MBTA general manager with 
the fact that the T "is paying 
people who sweep stations 
$40,000 a year." 

"1 have to live with collective 
bargaining agreements that were 
made in past years," he said. 
"We are making every effort to 
hold things down." 

City Councillor Joanne Condon 
noted that city officials have 
worked very hard to revitalize 
downtown Quincy and that the 
coming of the MBTA has helped. 

"But," she added, "I am 
concerned that the different rates 
for Quincy Center will discourage 
people from coming to the 
Square." 

The fare hike hearings, trailed 
by cameras from all three TV 
stations in Boston, moved on to 
Belmont Tuesday night, Maiden 
on Wednesday, and the grand 
finale tonight (Thursday) at 
Faneuil Hall, Boston. 

Solar Bus Here 

The Solar Bus will arrive at City 
Hall July 27 at 10 a.m. to help 
educate the public on the benefits 
of solar energy. 

Powered by 100 percent alcohol 
fuel made from grain and waste 
paper, the bus contains working 
solar energy devices for public 
viewing. An active solar domestic 
hot water system, a solar 
electricity panel, simple passive 
solar devices and several 
pamphlets are aboard the bus. 

"We hope Quincy residents 
come to view the bus and the 
solar display," said State Energy 
Secretary Joseph S. Fitzpatrick. 
"The purpose of the tour is to 
show the public that solar energy 
is available simply and cheaply." 

The bus will be at City Hall for 
one hour. 



69120 ' v u 4 * 0U T n b 





Vol. 13 No. 44 



Thursday, July 30, 1981 




After Proponents, Opponents Have Their Say 

Connector's Fate In State's Hands 



By TOM HENSHAW 

The fate of the contro- 
versial East-West Con- 
nector is in the hands of the 
state. 

Upwards of 150 people 
who packed the City 
Council Chamber at City 
Hall last Thursday for a 
State DPW hearing 
appeared to be split just 
about equally for and 
against the federal and state 
funded project. 

Proponents of the half-mile 
cross town roadway asserted that it 
was needed to offer easy access to 
the downtown business district 
from the proposed Burgin 
Parkway Extension. 

"If Quincy Center is to survive, 
we must build that road," Planning 
Director James Lydon told the 
hearing. 

"We have witnessed 20 years in 
which Quincy Center has declined 
as a major shopping center of the 
South Shore. We no longer have a 
major department store, mostly 
because we offer no easy access 
from outside. 

"Our concern must not be for the 
10 businesses that must be 
relocated for the road. Our 
commitment must be for the 
betterment of the entire 
community. We must sacrifice for 
a better future." 

Most of those who opposed the 
connector said they were Heartily 
in favor of the Burgin Parkway 
Extension, which would connect 
with the Southeast Expressway 
and open up Quincy Center from 
the south. 

But they drew the line at the 
East-West Connector as not 
needed and/or too disruptive of 
existing businesses on Hancock St. 
and/ or premature since it does not 
include any new development. 




PA RT OF CROWD of some 150 people who overflowed the City Council Chamber at City Hall for the state 
hearing on the East- West Connector last Thursday. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Dave Gillooly) 



Bernard Reisberg, proprietor of 
Bernie's Modern Formal, 1586 
Hancock St., and president of the 
Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association, 
registered his personal and the 
QCBPA's opposition to the road. 
"It is common sense, " he said, 
"that if construction of the 
connector starts in 1983 and is 
completed in 1985, Quincy Square 
has got to go down the drain. 

"Two of the largest stores in 
Quincy have commited to me that 
if the connector is announced they 
will close their doors and move 
out, even though Quincy is their 



See Sunbeams Page 4 

*0*1 t0t0*0* 0* 0*0i0*0q0*0t0^0*0*0*0*0t0^ 

best stores. 

"It is said that the project will 
cost more than $14 million. That is 
a mere token compared to the 
destruction of a prestigious 
downtown shopping center. 

"I he recent successful Sidewalk 
Bazaar showed that Quincy Center 
can make it. We are fighting for a 
proud business community and 
our livelihoods. 

"I think a great deal of the 
controversy that we have is 



because the merchants have lost 
confidence in the East-West 
Connector. They feel they have 
been misled and misinformed. 

"We were told from the 
beginning that Burgin Parkway 
Extension and the connector was 
one project. We're told tonight the 
extension can be built without the 
connector with some changes in 
the plan." 

Mayor Arthur H. Tobin, an 
advocate of the connector, 
conceded that the QCBPA voted 
against the connector, but he 
added. They didn't tell you it was 
less than five people on either 



side." 

'That's almost 50 per cent," he 
said. "That would tell me a good 50 
per cent of the businessmen in 
downtown Quincy do not oppose 
it. 

"But the East-West Connector 
should not be constructed because 

Mayor Tobin wants it. Nor should 
it not be built just because a group 
of downtown merchants don't 
want it. 

"It should be constructed or not 
constructed because it is good for 
the city of Quincy." 

Tobin pointed out that hearing 
officer Paul McHugh, a DPW 
engineer, said the Burgin Parkway 
Extension could indeed be built 
without the connector but only 
after major modifications and 
considerable delay. 

"That is the crux of the whole 
thing," he said. "We are now in 
1981. We could face a delay in 
building the extension until 1984 
or 1985. 

"If the East-West Connector 
goes down, we don't have to worry 
about the next mayor addressing 
the problem. By the time it gets to 
the drawing board you will be 
talking about several mayors." 

Two of those who would like to 
be the next mayor of Quincy 
announced stands on the East- 
West Connector for the first time. 

Francis X. McCauley and 
Daniel G. Raymondi were 
opposed to it, as of now, the 
former more strongly than the 
latter. 

"1 have spent some time talking 
to the public at large about thi 
project," said McCauley, "and 1 
find little or no public acceptance 
for this program. 

"What we are being asked to do 
is bring a road across the 
downtown area. It will 
inconvenience many and displace 
10 or 12 businesses. It will cost a lot 
of money. Is it all worth it? 

(Cont'd on Ha/ie ii) 



They're For It And, They're Against It 



JOHN R. HERBERT, presi- 
dent, Quincy Cooperative Bank: 
T am terribly afraid that if we do 
as some people have suggested, 
build the Burgin Parkway 
Extension and leave out the cross 
town connector, that that will be 
the end of Downtown Quincy as a 
shopping area. Relatively 
inexpensive land along Penn St. 
will become the new shopping 
center. The connector is the last 
best hope for Quincy Square." 

JAMES R. McINTYRE. former 
mayor: "Quincy is at a cross 
roads now. Are we going to move 
ahead with the road that is our 
lifeline to the south? Are we 
going to move forward with the 
East- West Connector? I think we 
should for the future life of Down- 
town Quincy." 

THOMAS S. BURGIN, former 
mayor: "I love Quincy. I want to 
see it go forward. I've seen it go 
forward. I've see it also down. 
And I don't want to see it go 
backward. It's most important to 
have the connector to bring traffic 
into the area." 



MICHAEL W. MORRISSEY, 

State representative: He noted 
the progress that has been made 
in the North Quincy business 
area, adding "the reason we've 
had success is access. The down- 
town area is starting to bud. The 
trees are starting to bear some 
fruit." 

WILLIAM AUSTIN, president. 
South Shore Bank: "Mistakes 
were made in the past and Quincy 
has paid the price. We've seen 
other areas grow at our expense. 
We believe this may be one of the 
last times this option will occur in 
Quincy. Funding in the future is 
more doubtful than it is now. 

"The South Shore Bank is 
willing to work closely and at a 
preferential rate (of interest) with 
any affected merchant if this 
program does movp fnrwarH " 

FRANCIS X. FINN, chief of 
police: "The city of Quincy is 
lacking in access across the city. 
The subway goes through the 
city. The Southeast Expressway 
goes through the city. But it is 

(Coni'il on I'aitf ~tl 



JOSEPH E. BRETT, former 
state representative and city 
councillor: "I am heartily in favor 
of the Burgin Parkway Extension 
but I see no reason for the 
connector. You can get to 
Hancock St. by School, Granite 
and Dimmock Sts. It's a terrible 
waste of the taxpayers' money. 
There is no problem getting from 
one side of the city to the other." 

ROBERT A. CERASOLI. State 
representative: "It may help the 
downtown in the future but we 
have to be concerned with the 
people who are in the downtown 
now and how it will affect them. 
The Burgin Parkway Extension is 
definitely needed. But is this 
necessary to the extension? I 
haven't seen the question 
answered." 

JACK LONDON, Quincy Furni- 
ture: "There are too many 
unanswered questions for me to 
approve this. It's utterly 
inconceivable that this hasn't 
been planned out a little more 
carefully. I ask, 'Why, why do 
they want it?' And they can't 
answer it." 



ARTHUR M. CHANDLER, 

president, Quincy Citizens 
Association: "The Square and the 
city are changing drastically 
physically. It is no longer the city 
we knew and want. We're fast 
becoming a mini-Boston and the 
bottom line is that we can't afford 
it. We're one of the highest taxed 
communities in the state. Big 
building projects have not helped 
us; they've probably done more to 
harm us. 

"It is beating a dead horse to 
think that we can compete with 
the South Shore Plaza. What we 
really need is money spent on 
remodeling the existing build- 
ings. Many don't think the 
Square is dead. We don't see that 
many buildings closed. The 
biggest problem is the economy 
itself, not the Square. 

"Perhaps the whole question 
belongs on the ballot this summer 
and let the chips fall where they 
may." 

SUMNER COHEN, Kincaides. 
1609 Hancock St.; "Surgery of 
the main artery in a business area 



is a very serious thing. It car 
easily lead to the death of the 
area. The road would affect 60 to 
80 businesses, not just 10. The 
effects would range from 100 per 
cent destruction to a drop of 40 
per cent in volume of business. A 
40 per cent drop must be 
considered fatal." 

JACK ALLEGRINI. Paperama. 
169 Parkingway: "Our store 
attracts close to 500.000 
customers a year. It is our most 
successful store. We really don't 
need an East- West Connector to 
get people downtown. The Iridge 
(over the MBTA tracks) would in 
a de facto sense close our store. ' ' 

CHARLES RYDER, Ryder's. 
1487 Hancock St.: "I'm not 
against progress. I fully support 
the Burgin Parkway Extension. I 
do not support the connector. The 
destruction of business in down- 
town Quincy for two years during 
construction is too high a price to 
pay." 

DR. CARL GOODMAN. 
dentist. 37 "Revere Rd.: "No 

(( iml'd on Paftv j) 



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«. uy Councillor Francis .1. 
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taking permanent city positions 
until two years after their 
appointments expire. 

McCauley, a candidate for 
mayor, said he was inspired to 
prepare the ordinance because of 
recent bid to establish the $25,000 
a year post of Director of 
Materials Management at City 
Hospital. 

A leading candidate for the 
position is City Purchasing Agent 
William J. Kelly. 

The ordinance establishing the 
position failed to pass the City 



Council by a vote ol five for and 
three against last week but City 
Solicitor Robert Fleming then 
ruled Council approval was not 
needed. 

Mayor Arthur H. Tobin said he 
and Hospital Director Michael 
Kitchen are awaiting a written 
opinion by Fleming before making 
the next move. 

"Mr. Fleming's oral opinion is 
that the enterprise account for the 
hospital gives the Hospital Corp. 
of America the right to operate the 
hospital and reorganize from 
within," said Tobin. 

'This is part of the reorganiza- 
tion by HCA. 

There were no candidates for 




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the position sponsored by the 
mayor. If there ever was an 
argument for keeping politics out 
of the hospital this is it. They saw 
the political football and kicked 
it." 

McCauley noted that Kelly 
would be the second purchasing 
agent appointed by Tobin to wind 
up in a $25,000 post at the hospital. 
Aggrippino (Rocky) Roccuzzo 
was appointed two years ago. 

McCauley promised to 
challenge any ruling that would 
deny the City Council the right to 
approve or reject new positions at 
the hospital. 

"I find nothing in the recently ' 
passed home rule petition that 
gives the hospital administration 
the unrestricted right to create new 
positions," he said. 

'This action flies in the face of an 
overwhelming vote of the citizens 
of Quincy for reduced government 
through their approval of 
Proposition V/i." 

McCauley said any person 
appointed to a position in his 
administration would take the 
position with "full knowledge that 
no permanent position will be 
created for them at a later date." 

110 Building 
Permits In June 

A total of 110 permits for 
building estimated to cost 
$1,508,100 were issued during 
the month of June, it was 
reported by Building Inspector 
Allan MacDonald. 

One permit was issued for 
construction of a single family 
home valued at $40,000. 

There were 79 permits for 
residential alterations at 

$214,420; 15 for other alterations 
at $1,194,500; six removals at 
$5,500; nine signs at $3,080; and 
25 miscellaneous jobs at $50,600. 

Department receipts for June 
totalled $6,479 for permits and 
$300 in inspection fees. 



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Ihursday, July 30, I9SI Quincy Sun Page 3 



Now, Candlelight Dinners At Home With Rent-A-Chef 



By NANCY McI.AHGHMN 

Have you ever wanted to 
surprise someone with a special 
candlelight dinner, but shied 
away from the idea because of 
all the time, effort and expertise 
involved? 

Wouldn't it be nice if the 
dinner could magically appear 
without all the fuss? 

Well, it's not magic, but Chef 
Bob Sanderson of 181 Belmont 
St., Quincy, can prepare such a 
meal for you in your own home. 

Sanderson, a professional 



chef, who owns and operates 
the new catering service Rcnt- 
A-Chef, can come into your 
home and prepare a candlelight 
dinner while you relax and 
enjoy yourself. 

The chef brings with him 
linen, dishes, pots and pans, 
champagne and food. He 
prepares the meal, serves you 
and cleans up afterwards. 

Specializing in candlelight 
dinners for two or small groups 
of up to eight, Rent-A-Chef 
offers a selection of dinner 
entrees. Suggestions include 



baked smiled lohster. center 
cut sirloin steak, boneless 
chicken breasts, baked stuffed 
shrimp, or any dinner you 
desire. 

Candlelight dinners make 
great surprises for birthdays, 
anniversaries or other 
occasions with someone 
special, suggests Chef Bob. 

Besides offering candlelight 
dinners. Rent-A-Chef also 
offers private cooking lessons 
for those who "can't boil 
water". 



Hancock Court Project 
Gets A Green-Light 



The State Division of Water 
Pollution Control has conceded 
that it made a mistake when it 
denied a permit for Hancock 
Court on School St. to make a 
sewage connection with the Town 
Brook Interceptor. 

Hancock Court is an eight-story 
building with 80 units of elderly 
housing plus commercial space on 
the ground floor. 

Last May, the Division of 



Water Pollution Control turned 
down the sewer connection 
permit on grounds that the Town 
Brook Interceptor could not 
handle the expected flow from the 
building. 

"It was a mistake," said 
William Slagle of the DWPC. "It 
wasn't researched enough. 
Quincy did not pick up the fact 
that the sewage enters the system 
downstream of the interceptor." 



In fact, he said, the flow from 
Hancock Court will enter the 
system at or about Revere Rd. 
and will not impact the 
inadequate South Quincy section 
of the line. 

This week, the DWPC is 
publishing in The Quincy Sun its 
permission for OCB, Inc., the 
O'Connell Brothers, builders of 
Hancock Court, to go ahead with 
the sewer connection. 




Conservation Commission Meets 



RENT A CHEF, a new catering service based in Quincy, has just 
started cooking. Michael and Gale Morin get set to enjoy their 
candlelight dinner prepared by Chef Robert Sanderson. 

(Quincy Sun Photo by Date Gillooly) 

98 Plumbing Permits In June 



The Quincy Conservation 
Commission was scheduled to 
hold a regular meeting last night 
(Wednesday) at 7:30 p.m. in the 
conference room at 100 Southern 
Artery. 

Items on the agenda were: 



checks on the status of removal of 
illegal fill on: Rockland St.- 
Chatham St.. adjacent to 10 Beebe 
Rd., and at Russell Park-Cedar 
Place; request from Sumac Road 
Abutters to restore a ramp at the 
end of Sumac Rd.; and a Citv 



Council order of June 30, 
involving George Howard 
accepting a donation of three lots 
of land on Manet Ave. for 
conservation. 



The Department of Plumbing 
and Gas Inspection issued 98 
permits for plumbing estimated 
to cost $86,867 during the month 
of June. 

A total of 155 inspections were 



made and $975 in permit fees was 
collected. 

There were 55 gas fitting 
permits issued and work 
estimated to cost $37,397; and 
1 1 1 inspections were made and 
$388 collected in fees. 



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Quincy Suti 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quiney Sun Publishing Company 

1372 Hancock St., Quiney. Massachusetts 02169 

*& Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

15c Per Copy - $7.00 Per Year - Out of State $10.00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass 

POSTMASTER: Send address change to 

The Quincv Sun. 1372 Hancock St. 

Quiney. Mass. 02169 

Member New England Press Association 



The Quiney Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that 
part of an advertisement in which the typographical error 
occurs 






Raymondi Stresses 
Controlling Spending 



"Quincy's future depends upon 
controlling city spending and 
fiscal responsibility to the city's 
taxpayers." said mayoral 
candidate and city councillor 
Daniel G. Raymondi. 

"Making sure city funds are 
well spent." said Raymondi, 
"will guarantee that our city will 
continue to prosper and provide 
necessary city services. We must 
ensure that we get the most out of 
our tax dollars. 

Speaking at a coffee party at 
the home of his supporters, John 
and Patricia Rodophele of 126 
Harvard St., Raymondi cited his 
10 years in public service of 
"scrutinizing budgets" and 
responsibly dealing with 

spending issues as evidence of his 
fiscal management skills. 

"Long before Proposition 2 l A, I 
was concerned with city spending 
and its impact on the property tax 
of Quiney. I was the only city- 
councillor who voted against a 
city budget five years ago which 
resulted in a $35 tax increase for 
Quiney," stated Raymondi. 

"It was clear to me that the 
residents of Quiney could not 
afford the impact of such a 



property tax increase and that 
more could have been done to 
reduce city spending. I felt it was 
my fiscal responsibility and 
responsiveness to the residents of 
Quiney to vote, no." 

Raymondi stressed the 
"desperate need" for a firm hand 
at Quincy's coffer and pledged to 
operate city government in an 
apolitical and professional 
manner. "The days of over- 
estimating receipts and manipu- 
lating figures are over," said 
Raymondi. 

Commenting on the legisla- 
ture's latest state budget which 
returns higher state aid to Quiney 
than was originally expected, 
Raymondi said, "Hopefully, the 
state aid formula will be changed 
to benefit cities like Quiney even 
more. If that change occurs, 
Quiney will be in a better financial 
condition. Proper management of 
city funds ensures our ability to 
provide essential city services 
while keeping spending costs 
down. My background in leader- 
ship positions at the city council 
has given me the experience to 
guide our city on a firm and sound 
financial course." 




uincy 



Cjuiz 



Two winners in the Quiney Quiz this week. 

Kristin A. Murphy, a knowledgeable visitor from Houston, 
Texas, wins a T-shirt and John Gilfeather, 55 West Elm Ave., 
Wollaston, wins a bumper sticker. 

Each week two Quiney Sun T-shirts and two Quiney Sun 
bumper stickers are offered as prizes in the Quiney Quiz. 

The first two readers (one a mail subscriber) to submit to the 
Sun office in writing the correct answers to the week's five 
questions receive T-shirts. The next two receive bumper stickers. 

One person in each home is eligible to compete in any one week 
and no person is eligible to win more than three T-shirts. 

This week's Quiney Quiz: 

1. What is the name of the coach of the Morrisette Junior 
Legion baseball team? 

2. True or false: Moon Island is part of Quiney. 

3. In what section of the city is Bass St.? 

4. John J. Quinn has served on the City Council for 22 years. 
Who was mayor when Quinn first became a member of the 
Council? 

5. What well-known Quiney landmark is located at 1517 
Hancock St.? 

Answers to last week's Quiney- Quiz: 

1. The newest member of the Quiney Housing Authority's 
Board of Commissioners is Frank Terranova. 

2. True. Quiney was the ninth largest city in Massachusetts, 
according to the 1980 U.S. census. 

3. Crabtree Rd. is in the Squantum section of Quiney. 

4. Francis X. McCauley and Daniel G. Raymondi are members 
of the current City Council who served terms as elected members 
of the School Committee. 

5. Francis X. Finn has been chief of the Quiney Police 
Department since 1966. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



We Must Work Together 



The proposed cross-town connector in the 
past few days has become one of the most 
controversial — and emotional — local issues in 
quite sometime. 

More so, even than the recent closing of 
elementary schools. 

Long time friends and business acquaintances 
have lined up on different sides of the issue with 
strong feelings separating them. 

So far though, most of the downtown 
businessmen and women are still friends, 
respecting one another's right to differ on an 
issue of such impact. 

And that's the way it should be. 

The worst thing that could happen to Quiney 
right now — particularly the downtown area 
is for those on opposite sides to let their personal 
feelings run amok. 

Members of the Quiney Center Business and 
Professional Association are closest to the 
question of to build or not to build the connector 
and they will be most directly affected whether it 
does or does not become a reality. 

Some feel the roadway leads to nowhere. 
Others insist it will lead to downtown Quincy's 
funeral, disrupting and splitting the Hancock St. 
area. so. that downtown can't survive. 

But others are convinced that Quiney is now at 
a crucial crossroads and the city's not just the 
downtown area's future is at stake. The 
connector is seen by them as the last chance to 
make the downtown area viable and 
competitive. They see it as a matter of vibrant life 
or a slow death. 

At a meeting of the QCBPA just hours before 
last week's public hearing, those present voted 
24-9 in opposition to the connector. But in a 
telephone poll, members contacted voted 18-8 in 
favor. Together, the vote was 32-27 — a scant 
five vote difference. The association has 117 



members. 

Later that same day, the Progress For 
Downtown Quiney (PDQ) voted 14-0 for the 
connector. There were three abstentions. 

On the strength of the two votes, it would be 
hard to claim opposition to the connector is 
overwhelming in the downtown area. But it is 
strong on the part of those who oppose the 
connector. It seems unlikely opponents can be 
wooed over to the proponents side. 

In fact, it is strong enough that there was some 
flip-flopping from "for" to "against" in the few 
hours between the QCBPA meeting and the 
public hearing as pressure was exerted here and 
there. 

But for the most part, proponents and 
opponents are standing their ground. 

Whether the day will ever come tha^t you will 
drive along a connector, remains to be seen. 
Meanwhile the arguments will go on until a final 
decision to build or not to build is made and 
maybe for years after that. 

But it is hoped that regardless of that decision 
it will not divide — emotionally or otherwise 
those owning or running stores and other 
businesses in the downtown area. 

These are tough times. People who disagree 
on one issue can't let it become a personal thing. 
They've got to continue to work together lor a 
common goal and that is a better Quiney. 

As downtown goes, so goes the rest of the city. 

A community is really judged by its 
downtown. A shabby, deteriorating downtown 
hurts everyone even if you have a well manicured 
front lawn and tennis courts in the backyard on a 
picturesque residential street. A viable 
downtown helps everyone. tax revenue, jobs 
— and image. 

Downtown is a community's municipal badge 
for all to see. 

It's either shiny or it isn't. 



Committee Named 
For Mclntyre Mall Dedication 



Mayor Arthur Tobin has named 
a committee to plan the dedication 
of Mclntyre Mall. 

The first meeting of the 
committee was scheduled for last 
night (Wednesday) at 7 p.m. in the 
second floor conference room of 
City Hall. 

Mayor Tobin called the meeting 
to begin making plans and 
discussing an agenda for the 
dedication. 

"Mclntyre Mall was named in 
memory of Police Captain 
(William F.) Mclntyre, explained 
Tobin," and I believe the time is 
most appropriate that the many 
friends of the Mclntyre familyjoin 



together to establish a fitting 
memorial and dedication of 
Mclntyre Mall", Tobin said. 

The Mclntyre family, he said, 
has made a "lasting and significant 
contribution to the history and 
growth of our City." 

"Captain William F. Mclntyre 
served our community with 
dedication and devotion and 
instilled in his children those 
qualities and virtues of helping 
their fellow man." 

Appointed by Tobin to the 
dedication committee were: 

Taylor Ahern, Carl W. 
Anderson, Rev. Bedros Baharian, 
Fire Chief Edward F. Barry, 



Henry .1. Bertolon. Henry W. 
Bosworth, Louise M. Braba/on. 
Mayor Thomas S. Burgin. Louis 
Caruso. Rita Daniels. Police Chief 
Francis X. Finn. City Clerk John 
M. Gillis. Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon. Joseph Hassan, Patricia 
F. Hunt, Paul A.M. Hunt, John.1 
Kelliher. Rabbi Jacob Mann. 
Patricia Marella, George B. 
Mathieson, William F. Mclntyre, 
Richard E. Post, Sr.. City 
Councillor John J. Quinn, James 
J. Ricciuti, George R. Riiey, 
Monsignor James J. Scally, 
Francis L. Sullivan, Frank R. 
Terranova. Henry Underbill, 
Hazel Usherand Frank W. Vallier. 



REMEMBER Willi 





Remember when ... 

... the Congregational Church 
of Christ stood by the side of 
the road in Houghs Neck. 

...Vou were not just a Policy 
Number and Retained your 
own identity, when personal 
service was always given... It 
still is at. 



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PLATNER 

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1357 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY 472-3000 



Thursday, July 30, 1981 Quincy Sun Pa|< 5 



They're For The Connector 



(l.tmt'il from /Vi#r I) 
difficult getting across the city. 
The connector would benefit 
emergency vehicles going back 
and forth across the city." 

ROBERT V1GODA. developer 
of property at Hancock and 
Dimmock Sts.: "We see the 
crosstown connector as a vital 
road for Quincy to reduce the 
congestion that will be created on 
completion of this development 
and to attract tenants and 
shoppers necessary to revitalize 
the downtown. " 

RICHARD LUNDGREN, vice 
president, Hunneman and Co., 
real estate service: "Quincy has 
always had a problem in the 
downtown area with respect to 
vehicular accessibility. It's 
difficult to get here from the 
major regional highways. Once 
you get downtown, it's difficult to 
get around. The connector would 
greatly improve vehicular 
accessibility." 

MICHAEL HARRINGTON, 
former congressman, speaking in 
behalf of Gateway Associates, 
developers: "My home city of 
Salem has been dealing with the 
question of access. If one doesn't 
get on and make a decision the 
likelihood is that the cost will be 
excessive and the likelihood is we 
will all be losers, developers and 
others." 

RONALD ZOOLECK. execu- 
tive vice president. South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce: 

"Members of Progress for Down- 
town Quincy (PDQ) voted 14 in 
favor of the connector and three 
abstentions. It is a local question. 



so the South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce takes no stand on it." 
BRENDAN GALLAGHER, 
president, North Quincy Develop- 
ment Corp., statement read by 
Janet Crowley: "It may cause 
inconvenience while under 
construction and lose some 
existing stores but in the long run 
it will benefit not only the down- 
town but the city as a whole. It 
will make easier access to the 
shopping area from all 
directions." 

JAMES A. SHEETS, city 
councillor: "Many cities facing 
2'/j and other economic problems 
would retrench. We have not 
done that. We have done some 
bold things in the last three years. 
The Campanelli building was a 
bold step forward. The '80s is a 
decade of opportunity for us. We 
must take this bold step if we are 
to revitalize the south end of 
Hancock St." 

STEPHEN J. McGRATH, city 
councillor: "Downtown Quincy is 
in serious trouble. Are we going 
to take Quincy into the 1990s or 
are we going to continue dealing 
with problems piecemeal? Access 
to Route 3 will bring people into 
Quincy. Burgin Parkway will 
solve one problem and create 
another, a traffic bottleneck. The 
connector will address this 
problem." 

JOANNE CONDON, city 
councillor: "Downtown Quincy is 
an important part of the city. Over 
the years it has steadily 



deteriorated. No one I have talked 
to in Downtown Quincy is happy 
about where they stand. We do 
not encourage new people to 
come in on a regular basis until 
we make it easier for shoppers to 
come in and leave." 

JOHN J. QUINN, city council- 
lor: "I would hate to see our great 
community come to a halt by 
reversing itself and returning to 
the bottleneck at Granite St. by 
not having proper exits or egress 
to Burgin Parkway. To delay 
decisions any longer may see 
evaporation of the federal and 
state money and an end to any 
action on the road." 

MARK DICKINSON, presi- 
dent, Dickinson Development 
Corp., Braintree: "It's the old 
chicken or the egg problem. 
Which comes first, the road or 
development?In my experience, 
the first thing is a commitment for 
the road. There is a commitment 
for the Burgin Parkway. There is 
no commitment for the cross town 
connector. For development of 
the Hancock Parking area or 
Hancock St.. a commitment for 
that road is absolutely essential." 

RONALD DRUKER, executive 
vice president, Druker Co. of 
Boston, developers: "Major 
tenants are only interested in 
areas in which they can get to and 
from easily. Also they have to 
know that any new roads are not 
just proposed but are real. It 
would be virtually impossible to 
interest a company in locating in 
Downtown Quincy without the 
connector." 



And, They're Against It 



(C.onl'il from Piifii' 1/ 

matter how you figure, this road 
will chop up the business section 
of Quincy. Burgin Parkway 
should be constructed first. A 
distributor road should be made 
into the Ross Parking Area, even 
at the city's expense. The after- 
effects of the road should be 
evaluated. If the cross-town 
connector is a valid road it will 
still be valid at that time." 

JOSEPH G. PRONE, attorney, 
1601 Hancock St.: "It appears to 
be a short-term disaster, possibly 
of some benefit in the distant 
future. The city exists for the 
benefit of the people who are in it. 
It doesn't exist to attract maybe 
someday people for a 10-story 
building. It's not a progressive 
move to flatten a considerable 
part of the downtown area with 



nothing to immediately replace 
it." 

ARDEN KEARNS, 61 John St., 
Montclair: "The connector will 
draw traffic away from Hancock 
St. and down to Chestnut St., 
Washington St., and Southern 
Artery. You are proposing the 
absolute death of the downtown 
Quincy business district." 

TONY DiGIACOMO, retired 
engineer: "I'm against the East- 
West Divider for many reasons. 
It's going to divide the city into 
two parts. That part's going to die 
and another section of the city is 
going to rise up. If you look at the 
people who voted for this here, 90 
per cent of them are people who 
are financially involved and 
people who don't live in the city 
... the Quincy Ledger, WJDA, the 
Quincy Sun, they used to live 



maybe some of them in Quincy 
but they have as much interest in 
Quincy as a fellow in Chicago. 

"They're saying that these 
people by making office buildings 
and by doing this and doing that 
we're going to have more 
business in Quincy. Far from it. 
It's an illusion they're giving you 
under the pretense of reducing 
the taxes. Whats going to happen 
is the people who have lived here 
all their lives are going to pay 
through the nose for a lot 
longer." 

TIMOTHY P. CAHILL, 35 
Packard's Lane, candidate for 
City Council: "I am against the 
road. The fact that it is pitting 
politicians and businessmen 
against each other will do far 
greater damage than building or 
not building the road." 



Connector In State's Hands 



(('onl'il from Pane I) 

"At this particular time, there is 
nothing at the end of that road. 
This is just not the proper time to 
displace businesses and spend the 
amount of money they want to 
spend. 

"We've got to have a 
commitment downtown and until 
it is made I don't think we should 
build the connector." 

Raymondi expressed his "strong 
unequivocal support" of the 
Burgin Parkway Extension but he 
added "there has to be some 
cautious concern" about the 
connector. 

"Back in the 1950s," he said, "the 
leaders of the community allowed 
the Southeast Expressway to be 
built without access to downtown 
Quincy. At that time, it allowed us 
to maintain a retail operation. 

"But that policy decision really 
began to hurt us in the 60s. It had a 
severe impact in the 70s. It's really 
killing us in the 1980s. 

"I can conceive of no other 
solution to open up access to the 
downtown area than to have the 

Upland Rd. (Burgin Parkway) 



Extension but I share concerns on 
the connector, particularly the 
potential closing of Hancock St. 

"Construction won't begin on 
the Burgin Parkway Extension for 
another two or three years. 
Perhaps that is the time to begin 
the process of looking at this 
connector and where it should be 
placed." 

City Councillor and former 
Mayor Joseph l.aRaia noted: "The 
concept of the roadway was born 
during my administration in 1977. 
But it was born with the idea of 
joint development at the same 



time. One gentleman who referred 
to it as 'pie in the sky' happens to be 
sitting in the mayors office today. 
I supported the whole idea then 
and 1 support the concept now. But 
the roadway does not now include 
development, which leaves a whole 
lot of questions on the net benefit 
of the connecting link." 

Others who wish to make state- 
ments pro or con on the connector 
have until Monday, Aug. 3, to 
send them to Justin L. Radio, 
chief engineer. Department of 
Public Works. 100 Nashua St., 
Boston 021 14. 



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1402 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY 
773-3636 



Quincy s 
Yesterdays 

By lorn Henshaw 




He'd Ban 
Women Drivers 

Benjamin F. Earl, 755 Washington St., Quincy Point, who 
claimed to have driven over a million miles since 1 898, told 
interviewers the road would be a lot safer if women drivers were 
banned. 

Women, he said, take advantage of 
their sex and expect men to be chivalrous 
and give them the right of way at all 
times on the road. 

There isn't one good woman driver in 
a thousand," he said. The only thing a 
woman knows how to do is steer a car 
between two curbings." 



July30-Aug.5, 

1936 

45 Years Ago 
This Week 



DILORETO SETS MARK 

Joe DiLoreto, slugging right fielder for the league-leading Fore 
River team, set two City League records and tied another when he 
hit three home runs in an 1 1-6 victory over the Copelands. 

DiLoreto, known as "DiMaggio 2nd" in Quincy Point, hit two 
homers in the Shipbuilders eight-run second inning and the third 
in his next time at bat for two new records. 

His three round-trippers in the same game tied the mark set by 
Al Kussmaul of the Italian American AA. 

Fore River - Grocott 3b, Carella 2b, Bowles ss. Desmond lb, 
McKeag cf, DiLoreto rf, Willdridge If. Duffy c, O'Leary p. 

Copelands - Malvesti 2b, Pellegrini ss, Kolson rf, F. Cavanaugh 
lb, W. Cavanaugh lb, Herbert rf, Pettiti cf, R. Smith c, Fra/ier 
3b, Davis p. 

SHOPLIFTERS AT WORK 

Quincy police issued a warning to downtown merchants that a 
band of organized shoplifters were operating in the city, ripping 
off shopkeepers in downtown Quincy. 

Louis Messick Dry Goods, 1476 Hancock St., lost 18 dresses; 
Markson Brothers, 1446 Hancock St., a man's suit; and Kane's 
Furniture, Hancock St., a radio, all the past fw days. 

SUNDAY AUTO SALES 

John P. Flavin, attorney for the Quincy auto dealers, appealed 
to the state to enforce a law in Weymouth, Braintree, Milton and 
Hingham that bans the sale of automobiles on Sunday. 

Police Chief John J. Avery had ordered all Quincy auto 
salesrooms closed on Sunday and Flavin told Public Safety 
Commissioner Paul Kirk that Quincy dealers were losing sales. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

The Quincy Yacht Club crew of Capt. Bud Montgomery and 
George A. Nash were eliminated in the semi-finals of the Prince of 
Wales Trophy competition in Yarmouth, N.S. . . . Work was in 
progress on a lower Hancock St. building that will house the new 
Sears Roebuck store . . . Mayor Thomas S. Burgin wired 
congratulations to Navy Capt. William F. Amsden of the USS 
Quincy following his ship's rescue of 140 Americans from civil 
war-torn Spain . . . Ralph McLeod, the star outfielder from North 
Quincy who was signed by the Boston Bees, got five hits in a 
doubleheaderfor McKeesport of the Pennsylvania State League. 
. . Ice cream was 30 cents a quart at Brett's, 205 West Squantum 
St., Montclair ... A mini-tornado cut a narrow path across Penn's 
Hill, South Quincy, lifting the hotbed sashes from the gardens of 
Russell Almquist on Hoover Ave. . . . City Clerk Emery L. Crane 
swore in four police matrons, Mrs. Margaret Matthews, Mrs. 
Marcella Byrne, Mrs. M.J. Taylor and Mrs. Annie Dorley . . . 
Andrew H. Peterson of Squantum, the state PWA director, 
conferred with President Franklin D. Roosevelt during a 
presidential stopover in Springfield . . . Mayor Burgin signed a 
formal WPA application to build a $100,000 high school sports 
stadium on the site of Pfaffman's Oval in Merrymount Park 
Norman Thomas, the Socialist Party candidate for president, 
opened his New England campaign with a speech at Quincy High 
School . . . Charles Francis Adams, former mayor and Secretary 
of the Navy, observed his 70th birthday at his summer home in 
Scituate . . . The 75-cent dinner at the Hollow (formerly Abbott's), 
516 Adams St., West Quincy, was fruit cup, soup, roast stuffed 
turkey, green peas, mashed potatoes, boiled onions, garden salad, 
rolls butter, coffee and blueberry pie . . . Arthur W. Paul took over 
as resident manager of the WPA Houghs Neck Communiy 
Center . . . "White Angel," the story of Florence Nightingale, 
starring Kay Francis, was playing at the Strand . . . Sgt. James J. 
Mullin of the Quincy Police was attending a two-week course in 
accident prevention at Harvard College. . . Audrey McGinnis, 16, 
of 201 Winthrop St., Houghs Neck, filled in for her older sister, 
Dorothy, and won the Miss Quincy title in a contest at Taylor's 
Ballroom . . . Samuel S. Mossman, 51 A Spear St.. a first cousin to 
Alfred M. Landon, the Republican candidate for president, 
registered to vote in Quincy . . . Chet and Elsie Young of 
Squantum won the citywide mixed doubles tennis title by 
defeating Betty MacFee and Alec Robb. 6-2. 12-10, on the Faxon 
Courts . . . Rump steak was 45 cents a pound at Foy's Markets, 
1177 Hancock St. and 39 Franklin St.. South Quincy. 



Pace 6 Quino Sun Thursday, Jul) 30, 1981 








DAVID NELSON recently was installed as president of the Lions Club of Quincy. I. eft to right, David 
Smith, secretary; Fred Nolan, first vice president; Nelson; Ed O'Leary, outgoing president; George Smith, 
treasurer; Arthur Gillis, past district governor, installing officer. 

tQitiiHY Sun I'lioln by Hick Malihni s) 

Quincy Women's Club Plans Social Aug. 4 



FONTBONNK ACADEMY'S Class of 1982 student council officers are, 
from left, Cynthia Yered of Jamaica Plain, treasurer; Anne McCarthy of 
Quincy, vice president; Maureen Ryan of Milton, president; and Clare 
Donelin of Quincy, secretary. 

Mr., Mrs. Richard Koch Grandparents 
Twice Over Week-end 



Mrs. Theodore Buker, First vice 
president and finance chairman, 
announces the next social and 
card party of the Quincy 
Women's Club will be Tuesday, 
Aug. 4 at 12:30 p.m. at the 
clubhouse, 148 Presidents Lane, 
Quincy. 

Mrs. John Rennie is chairman 



assisted by Mrs. Charles LeVine 
President, Mrs. Buker, Mrs. 
Madelyn Faunce, Mrs. Richard 
W. Forrest, Mrs. Alan C. Heath, 
Miss Helena F. McCormick, Mrs. 
Carl Oberg and Mrs. Samuel 
Rodman. 

Refreshments will be served. 



There will be a prize for each 
table. All proceeds go to the 
club's General Fund. The parties 
are open to the public. 

The next party will be for the 
Scholarship Fund on Tuesday, 
Aug. IS at 12:30 p.m. at the 
clubhouse. 



Leanne Woolsey Traveling In Western Europe 



Leanne Woolsey, 22. daughter of Wollaston. is traveling in 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Woolsey Europe this summer as part of the 



$10 OVEN CLEANED $10 

$14 RUGS CLEANED per room $14 

Bob's Oven Cleaning Service 773-8171 



DRAPERY 

CLEANING 

PLUS 

Plus Take Down and ReHang in your home or office 
Plus No Shrink written statement 
Plus the finest gentle cleaning and perfection pleating 
CALL 698-8300 ~ 



Walk m drapery cleaning 
accepted at all locations 



Eileen s 

A^Special Sizes 

12ft to32'/ 2 , 36 to 54 

We Specialize in the Latest Half-Size 
Fashions at Budget Prices 




Final Clearance 

Sale 

All Summer 
Merchandise 

50% off! 

Limited time only 



* Blouses 36 to 54 
* Slacks 30 to 46 * Dresses 12% to 32 % 
Vests, Skirts, Tank Tops and More!! 
New Fall Fashions Arriving Daily 
Quincy's Only Store Specializing in Half-Si7.cs 

1464 Hancock St., Quincy 479-7870 




(Across from Child World) 
Open 9:30 to 6 Thur. & Fri. til 9 



VISA' 



Gordon College European 
Seminar program. 

A member of the Western 
Europe team, she will travel 
extensively thoughout France. 
Switzerland. Austria. Germany, 
Holland, and England tracing the 
Protestant Reformation and its 
impact on the modern world. 

The team will spend two months 
in Europe. 

Miss Woolsey, a senior 
psychology major at Gordon, 
Wen ham. 



The stork was busy in Quincy 
last week-end as Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard J. Koch of 241 Newbury 
Ave., North Quincy, became 
grandparents again twice. 

The Koch's daughter, Mrs. 
Linda J. Bowes, delivered a 10 lb. 
10 ounce girl. Kristen Marie, 
Saturday at Quincy City Hospital. 

Their daughter-in-law, Mrs. 
Nancy Koch, delivered a boy. 
Matthew Richard, weighing 7 lbs, 
13 ounces Sunday at the same 
hospital. 

Both mothers are in the same 
room in the hospital. 

M-tthev is the first child for Mr 



and Mrs. Richard J. Koch, Jr., 
who live at 46 Putnam St. 
Maternal grandparent is Mrs. 
Dorothy Kelly of Wollaston. 

Kristen is the second child for 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Bowes of 
241 Newbury Ave., North Quincy. 
They also have a son, Thomas, Jr., 
age two. 

Mrs. Anna Bowes of Neponset is 
paternal grandmother. 

Richard J. Koch, Jr., and his 
sister Mrs. I.inda Bowes both have 
birthdays in April. There is an II 
month and one week difference in 
their ages. 



Flea Market 
At Memorial Congregational 



Memorial Congregational 

Church, 65 Newbury Ave., North 
Quincy. will sponsor a flea market 
Aug. 15, on the church lawn, from 
10 a.m. to4 p.m. 



space, call 
328-5420. 



either 328-5220 or 



Glendon 
announces 
spaces to 



Crowell, chairman, 
that there are 40 
rent. To reserve a 



There will be a snack bar open 
during the day, serving hot dogs, 
hamburgers, tea, coffee and soft 
drinks. 

In case of rain, the flea market 
will be held on Aug. 22. 



NEWSCARRIERS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



Carol DiGiusto On Dean's List 



Carol A. DiGiusto, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. DiGiusto 
formerly of Quincy, was named to 
the dean's list at Tufts University 
after maintaining a 4.0 grade 



average. 

Miss DiGiusto, who plans to 
pursue a career in medicine, will be 
a sophomore in the fall. 



:s£a 



Helen Gurieh's 

.BEAUTY GARDENS 

1436 Hancock St., Quinc^jjj 

Wishes To Announce 

NEW HOURS 

For Your Convenience 

472-9117 
472-9112 



Births 






Mon. thru Fri 8a.m. -10p.m. 



Sat. till 5 p.m. 










!*4 **" 



tyaW Aug. 4th 

Senior Citizens Discount 



•: •:•:• 



•:•:• :•:• 



%m 



>.«. .•.«.•.• 



Closed Mondays 

Open Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 A.M. - 5:30 P.M. 

Open Thurs. eves 'til 8:30 



July 1 2 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Brophy, 
(Irene Downey) I0X Granger St.. 
Wollaston. a son. 

July 13 

Mr. and Mrs. William 
Huyhurst, (Karen Giuliana), 10 
Cyril Ave. Bryanuillc. a son. 

July 21 

Mr. and Mrs. William Uee 
(Mary Salmon), 28 Cherry St., 
Quincy. a daughter. 

July 22 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Larson 
(Suzanne Townson), 20 Prout St., 
Quincy. a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James O'Hara 
(Valerie Pope), 31 Clement 
Terrace, Quincy, a daughter. 



The Florist 

389 Hancock St. 
Quincy 

3283959 

Since 1900 





Norfolk County 
Bar Association 

Lawyer reference service wilt 
help in selecting an attorney. 

If you need a lawyer and don't 
know one, call us and you vitii be 
referred to an attorney in your 
area who will talk to you for a 
nominal fee for the first visit. 

P. O. Box 66, Dedham, Mass. 

326-8699 

Call 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



Thursday, July 30, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 7 




MR. and MRS. JOHN GUGLIELMI 

(Mclntire's Studio) 

Jean M. Keyes Married 
To John A. Guglielmi, Jr. 



Jean M. Keyes and John A. 
Guglielmi. Jr., were married 
recently during a double ring 
ceremony and nuptial Mass at 
Most Blessed Sacrament Church, 
Quincy. 

The ceremony was performed by 
Rev. George Carlson and included 
a candle lighting ceremony. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Richard H. Keyes of 75 
Post Island Rd., Adams Shore. A 
graduate of Quincy High School 
and Quincy Junior College, she is 
employed as a legal secretary for 
Powers and Hall law firm, Boston. 

The bridegroom, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. John A. Guglielmi of 201 
West St.. West Quincy, is also a 
graduate of Quincy High School 
and Quincy Junior College. He is 
attending U. Mass-Boston, and is 



employed as a computer 
programmer for Boston Insulated 
Wire. 

Maid of honor was Cheryl 
Cantelli of Marshfield. Brides- 
maids were Lori Guglielmi. Lois 
Guglielmi, Lisa Guglielmi and 
Patricia Stewart, all of Quincy. 

Flower girl was Kerry Keane of 
Somerville. 

Best man was Vincent Picardi of 
Quincy. Ushers were Robert Lutz 
of Rockland; Joseph Greene of 
Marshfield; Stephen Bergonzi and 
John Keyes both of Quincy. 

A receptjon was held at the 138 
Motel, Easton. 

Folloing a wedding trip to 
Bermuda, the newlyweds are 
making their home in West 
Quincy. 



QHS Class Of 1946 
Planning Oct. 5 Reunion 



The Quincy High School Class 
of 1946 is planning a 35th class 
reunion Oct. 5. at Valle's, 
Braintree. 

The reunion committee has been 
unable to locate the following class 
members: 

Mrs. Pat (Dolan) Cray. 
Edmond Emond, G a e t o n 
Salvucci. Mrs. Edith (Krupnick) 
Koppekin. David Doyle, Francis 
McDonald, Ero Ruttila, Mrs. Ann 
(Doherty) Sweeney, Hugo Luoto, 
Elizabeth Baratelli, Rev. William 
Gray, Mrs. Jean (Galeaz/o) Smith. 



William Salvucci. Bruce Wiggins. 
John Killilea, Mrs. Nancy 
(MacAndrew) Tomlin. Mrs. 
Maureen (Moulton) Finan. Owen 
Dellalucca, Mrs. Barbara (Little) 
Masarik. Richard Hatch, Rev. 
Hoover Wong, Raymond 
Shepherd. Mrs. Phyllis (Lloyd) 
Snow. Mrs. Mary (Doherty) 
Murphy and Mrs. Rosemary 
(Marshall) Gardner. 

Anyone having any information 
on the whereabouts of the missing 
class members is asked to contact: 
James DeCristofaro, 773-5478, or 
Albert Thompson, 335-5745. 



Mr., Mrs. Robert Lancellotti Parents 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Lancellotti of Long Beach. Ca.. are 
parents of a son, Christopher 
Robert, their first child, born June 
8, at Long Beach Memorial 
Hospital. 

Mrs. Lancellotti is the former 
Debra Toutloff. 



Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Victor Folkins of Weymouth, 

1 II. ., ~A 



Mrs. 
California 



Folkins ot Weymouth, 
ly of Quincy; and Mr. and 
Anthony Lancellotti of 



formerly ui v u,,,, -. v < a,,u 
Anthony Lance 




ENGAGED - The Hon. and Mrs. 
John G. Turner of Albany, N.Y., 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Faith Ann, to 
Sean V. Chrisom, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Peter J. Chrisom of Milton, 
formerly of Wollaston. Miss 
Turner, a graduate of St. 
Michael's College, Winooski, Vt., 
is an evaluator for the Regents 
External Degree Program in 
Albany. Mr. Chrisom, a graduate 
of Archbishop Williams High 
School and St. Michael's College, 
is pursuing a master's degree in 
accounting at Northeastern 
University. A Sept. 12, wedding 
is planned. 



Social 



Judy Lutts 

Visiting 
Ohio Valley 

Judy Lutts, a Quincy Cadette 
Girl Scout for the past six years, 
was chosen to attend the 1981 
Wider Opportunity "Try It Now" 
in Ohio from July 19 to July 30. 

An eighth grader, Judy enjoys 
rowing and sailing lessons and is 
active in her school's chorus. 

She will travel to the cultural 
and historical Ohio Valley where 
she will further develop her 
camping and aquatic skills, 
joining 126 other Girl Scouts in 
side trips and intercultural 
exchanges. 

The opportunity is offered by 
the Buckeye Trails Girl Scout 
Council of Dayton, Ohio, with 
participant chosen on the basis of 
Girl Scouting experience, written 
applications, and personal 
references. 



BRA -WE Y ^4» 
FLORIST *$. 

94 Washington Si *" 
Weymouth 
3370288 3370289 



INSTANT COLOR 

PASSPORT 
PHOTOS 

JicJntlre 3 

Stuaio 

679 Hancock St., Wollaston 

Liosed Monday Tel: 479-6888 



Save Gas and Money .. 
... Shop Locally 



Guys & Gals 

Get the Latest 
Blow Cut 

# Shampoo* Precision Cut* Blow Dry 



Virginia's Nursery 
Day Care and 
Kindergarten 

on Wollaston Beach 

Open Year Round. Early 
Childhood Education. 
Call Virginia 

328-4332 




At a price you can afford 
■ Cr HI S ' noludes cut. shampoo, 
creme rinse, styling 
\to appointment necessary - just come on in! 



M2 



Mastercharge - Visa Accepted 



Parking In Rear Of Shop 

Hours: 8:30-6:00 Daily 
Thurs. & Fri. til 9 



Marvel 

5 Cottage Ave., Quincy 
472-9681 




MR. and MRS. ALFRED TRIPOLONE 



(Mclntire's Studio) 



Kathleen Bouchie Married 
To Alfred Tripolone, Jr. 



Kathleen A. Bouchie and Alfred 
Tripolone, Jr., were married 
recently at St. Joseph's Church, 
Quincy Point during a double ring 
ceremony and nuptial Mass 
performed by Rev. Joseph 
Nar/venis. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. I 
and Mrs. Robert Bouchie of 75 
Cleverly Ct., Quincy Point. A 
graduate of Quincy High School, 
she is attending Massasoit 
Community College and is 
employed as a bookkeeper for 
IBC. Corp. 

The bridegroom, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred Tripolone of 247 
Forest St., Brockton, is a graduate 
of Brockton High School. He 
attended Massasoit Community 
College and the University of 
Alaska, and also served for three 



years in the U.S. Army. He is 
employed as a salesman by Knapp 
Shoe. 

Maid of honor was Lori Prince 
of Milton. Bridesmaids were Ellen 
Bouchie of Quincy; Laura Fussell 
of Jacksonville, Fla.; Anna 
Tripolone, Mary Tripolone and 
Linda Prohaska, all of Brockton. 

Best man was James Andrews III 
of Brockton. Ushers were Robert 
Bouchie, Jr., of Wareham; Joseph 
Bouchie of Ayer; David Tripolone, 
Joseph Tripolone and Arthur 
Tripolone, all of Brockton. 

Ringbearer was Jason Gould of 
Brockton. 

A reception was held at the 
Viking Club, Braintree. 

Following a wedding trip to 
Maine and Florida, the newlyweds 
are making their home in 
Brockton. 



LOVE IS 




. a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 

Speak to Terry Slracco - She's our rental agent - 
specializing in complete wedding package plans 
and all other occasions. The Golden Lion Suite 
accommodates up to 300. The Venetian Room up 
to 1 50 guests. Give Terr; a call for an appointment 
for your reservation. New brochures are available, 
(air conditioned) 

CALL Quincy Sons of Italy Social Center 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy, MA 02169 

NEW NUMBER is 472-5900 



^dfe^i BAKERY 



m 

kiwi if •:•.' 



Mass. Retail Bakers Assoc. 
1st Prize Winner for Wedding Cake Decoration 



flc 






Your Wedding Will Be Better 
With A Cake From Whitey's 

Birthday, Shower and Anniversary Cakes, Frozen 
Desserts, Ice Cream Rolls, Ice Cream Cakes and Tarts 



SPECIALS FOR 1 WEEK 

FROM THURS. JULY 30 THRU WED. AUG. 5 



27 Washington St. 
Weymouth Landing 

3371471 



Boston Cream Pies 

REG. $2.65 $415 

NOW ONLY 



*2 



Buy 1 Dozen Cookies 

AT OUR REG. PRICE M. 44 Doz. 

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GET HALF 
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Sugar - Chocolate Chip - Peanut Butter 
OPEN DAILY 6:30 A.M. TO 6 P.M., SUN. 7 A.M. TO 2 P.M. 



Page 8 Quimy Sun Thursday Jul) «<>, 1981 



Quincy City Club's 
Happy Acres Camp Cookout Aug. 4 



The Quincy City Club will 
sponsor its annual cookout for the 
stall and members of the Happy 
Acres Hay Camp Tuesday. Aug. 4. 
at noon at Pageant Field 
Merrymount Park. 

Theodore DeCristofaro. vice 
chairman of the Park and 
Recreation Board, will prepare the 
food for the cookout committee, 
assisted by Shaun Mulvaney and 
Raymond Cattaneo. 

The cookout is one of a series of 



projects provided each year by the 
organization on behalf of the 
elderly and retarded. 

Incorporated in 1974. the 
Quincy City Club has been a 
charitable service oriented group. 



donating gifts and equipment to 
hospitals and organizations. 

Richard J. Koch is president of 
the City Club, Thomas R. Burke, 
treasurer and Joseph M. I.ydon. 
secretary and clerk. 



John DiDonato On Dean's Lis! 



John A. DiDonato, 61 Keating 
St., has been named to the dean's 
list for the spring semester at 



Merrimack College, North 
Andover. DiDonato is a junior 
majoring in electrical engineering. 



PRE-OPENING 



Of 2 New 

JOY HEALTH SPAS 

• 102 Parkingway, QUINCY 



How To Get Rid Of 
Ugly Cellulite 



QUESTION: 

ANSWER: Joy Health Spas 

/ Got Rid Of My Ugly Cellulite At Joy 
I've been needing to lose weight, but what really bothered 
me was the ugly cellulite. 

I lost the weight but nothing helped. Finally I came to Joy. I 
went from Size 1 1 to Size 7. But most importantly I got rid of 
those ugly lumps! This is the first year that I'm actually 
looking forward to bathing suit season. 

r VALUABLE COUPON J 

i 8 Great Weeks 



Offer 
Expires 
8/3/81 



WITH 
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it i 

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programs • dressing rooms • private lockers • unlimited visits • certified 
I instructors • private showers 



VISA' 



Free 

HEALTH m *** »»'"»' 
SPAS Quincy 328-9355 




IN APPRKCIATION — Former State Rep. Joseph E. Brett (left) was 
honored at a recent awards dinner for his service on the board of directors 
of Cerebral Palsy of the South Shore Area, Inc. Presenting a plaque to 
Brett is Anthony Famigletti, chairman of the annual testimonial dinner 
dance. 



69 On Point Honor Roll 



Quincy Point Junior High 

School lists 69 students on the 

fourth-quarter honor roll. They 

are: 

High Honors 

Grade 7 
Kathleen Bitetti, Catherine M. 
Brecn, Kevin J. Jolley, Sang Chul 
Yoo. 

Honors 
Grade 7 
Sandra M. Benson, Michelle M. 
Bevilacqua, Christina L. 

DeBettcncourt, Dawn M. DcPolo, 
Anthony J. Fantasia, Robert T. 
Fitzgerald, Lynn A. tullerton, 
Michael A. Hanrahan, Gregory C. 
Harper, Chuong Hong Ly, John J. 
Morey Jr., Edward J. O'Brien, Alfred 
P. Perez, Robert P. Pitts. 
High Honors 
Grade 8 
Silvana Bagu, Laura J. Brennan, 
Patricia M. Brown, Sule Cagdas, 
Susan C. Dextradeur, Daniele A. 
Marini, Irene Papamarkou. 
Honors 
Grade 8 
Vincent J. Baldi. Claudia M. 



Cicerone, Thomas R. Delaney, Karen 
M. DiNardo, Andrea J. Griffin, 
Lynnc M. Gurney, Kathleen !•'. 
Keelcy, Patricia A. Lindblom, 
Catherine M. Lomanno, Carol A. 
MacLellan, James A. Mayo, Jeanninc 
M. McLaughlin, Danielle M. Morris, 
William J. Shaughnessy. 
High Honors 
Grade 9 

Maria Andrews, Annamarie 
Cicerone, Dorothy DelGizzi, Jeffrey 
M. I'crris, Melissa Flaherty, Paula C. 
I'oye, Andrea Garofalo, Eric J. 
Jolley, Lisa M. Lawlor, Stacy L. 
MacPherson, Teresa A. Miller, Charles 
M. Sadlier. 

Honors 
Grade 9 

Amy M. Barron, Catherine R. 
Barry, Debra A. Bonvie, Tammy L. 
Canale, Deborah M. Creighton, 
Cheryl A. Cullen, Daniel J. Curtin, 
Luciana Iraneiosa, James R. Grassi, 
Carol I. Hennessy, Jeanninc M. 
Houle, Lisa Joseph, Jennifer T. 
Josephs, Karen M. Kardoose, Lorric 
J. Overby, Maureen Perry, David J. 
Smith, Danielle L. Twomey. 



Senior Citizens Shopping 
Service Special 




SQUJUnVM PHARMACY | 

746 E. Squantum St., Quincy 328 1082 



$1.00 off on any new 
or transferred prescription. | 

One coupon 



With this ad I 



per prescription. 



exp. 8/26 



% 



Colonial Federal Savings 

and Loan Association of Quincy 



Reduced rate registered checks for senior 
citizens who are depositors. 

We recommend direct deposit of 
government pension checks to assure safety 
and regularity of receipt. 

NOW accounts available - generous 
conditions. 

Quincy • 15 Beach St., Wollaston 471-0750 
Also in Hoi brook, Wareham, hast Weymouth 




A Mug of Coffee and a 
Muffin of your choice 

Breakfast, 

Sandwich Luncheon. 

Dinners 



472-9641 



■pStyoBgCfi 





mm 

HEAL ■ ST., WOLLASTON 



Quincy 
Hearing 
Aid Dispensers 



fl 24*. (Uncock St. 
' ocilfd nr»t door Uy\ 
Bargain Center 

/V Service, Sell, and| 
tepair all Makes o'f 

Aidsjand Carry 

: a Complete 

: LifeArV 

Batteries 



Trials 



773-0900 



Hearing Aids 

and batteries 

are now available to 

Medicaid Card Holders. 

Wie make house calls 

to nursing homes 

and shut-ins. 



ROBERT KARAS 

Certified Hearing 

Aid Audiologist 



Quincy cooperative bank 

Outstanding Banking Services For Senior Citizen s 



Main Office. 1259 Hancock Street 
Quincy . Massachusetts 02 1 69 • 1 61 7 1 479 660* » 



Q 



Other offices: 1000 Southern Artery, Quiruy. 
Route 3 A, Cohasset: Routes 53 & 139, Hanover. 
280 Grove Street, Braintree. 



Thursday, July 30, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 9 



INCREDIBLE 
TWO-DAY OFFER 

Saturday August 1, and Monday August 3, 1981 




This is the same thirty month 
term certificate that is so popular. 



ALL DEPOSITS 
FULLY INSURED 





27 * 

BUYS OUR $1,000 
TERM CERTIFICATE 

Thousands Sold at $737.86 this year! 

WHY JUST TWO DAYS? 

Were quite serious about this. By act of Congress a small loophole exists - a matter 
of just a few business hours - wherein old interest rates are no longer valid and new 
interest rates are not yet established. You'll get the advantage of this - a situation 
that has never happened here before and is unlikely to ever happen again. 

Get $ 1,000 at maturity -Earn *318.73 



Yes! You are reading this correctly. 

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Of course penalties apply for early redemption if permission to redeem is granted by the bank. 



Pair 10 Quinr) Sun Thursday. Jul> «). |»XI 




FORREST I. NEAL (right), longtime Quincy businessman, receives 
silver Paul Revere bowl at Quincy Neighborhood Club reception from 
Michael J. Powell, executive director of the MBTA Retirement Fund in 
recognition of his II years of service on the fund's board of directors. He 

retired in 1978. 

(Quincy Sun Phalli by Mary O'kt'of/c) 

Daniel lli^ins On Duly In Kn^laml 



Airman First Class Daniel J. 
Higgins. son of Mrs. Arlene R. 
Higgins, 132 Palmer St., German- 
town, has arrived in England for 
duty at the Royal Air Force Base 



in Benrwaters. 

Higgins, an aircraft crew chief 
with the 81st Tactical Fighter 
Wing, was previously assigned to 
Pease AFB.N.H. 



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Mr. Anthony's 
Barber Shop 



* Senior Citizens' Haircuts 
$2.75 -Male and Female 

• Children under 12 years -$3.00 
•All Others $3.75 



Shaves $2.00 

Shampoos $2.00 

Hair color ing and Shampoo... $5.00 



• Housecalls also made for Invalids 

393 Water Street 

Brewer's Corner 47 1 -9497 

West Quincy 



225 Receive Service 
Pins At Quincy Hospital 



Michael Kitchen, director of 
Quincy City Hospital, presented 
service pins to 225 employees at 
awards ceremonies recently. 

A reception followed the 
presentations. 

Invited guests included Mayor 
Arthur H. Tobin, members of 
the City Council, Hospital Board 
of Managers and the hospital 
administrative staff. 

Presented service pins, 
covering the years 1979, 1980 
and 1981 were: 

10 Year 

Doris Adams, Klanor Allison, 
Marjorie Archer, Charles Arien, 
Pamela Baker, Muriel Banks, Virginia 
Bauman, Mary Joan Beagan, Susan 
Becker, Mary Bennct, Cecily 
Bergman, Jane Betzger, Maureen 
Bisognano, Joan Botte, Robert 
Bradbury, Frances Bresnahan, 
Maureen Brosseau, Catherine 
Buerhaus, Joseph Calvi, Stephanie 
Carnali, Candida Cellueci, Rita 
Ccrrato, Amy Chase, Ruby Ciol'tl, 
Dorothy Civitarese, Patricia Clancy, 
Constance Comeau, Mary Cuddyer, 
Barbara Daiute, Helen Daniels, Janet 
Dcmiter, Mary Dcschainc, Muriel 
Devaney, Patricia Dulkis, Barbara 
hair weather, John I'antucehio, John 
lelci, Jane field. 

Linda I'arrag, Catherine Fisher, 
Margaret Flaherty, Margaret Flynn, 
Mary lolun, Gerard Calvin, F.velyn 
Goldt'arb, Albcrtina Graz.io, Gertrude 
Gray, Barbara Griffin, Doris Henley, 
Kathleen Herman, Mary Ann Hunter, 
Maria Incis, Mary Ann Johnson, Jean 
Jones, Susanne Kadlick, Victoria 
Keif, John Kelly, Carol Knowlton, 
Rita Korctsky, Janet Koster, Carol 
Lang, Jean Larson, Agnes Leonard, 
Linda Leone, Jean Leslie, Rose Less, 



Kathleen Little, Barbara Logan, 
Gerard Long, Laura Lubin, Joanne 
Malley, James Martell, Dorothy 
Mateza, Patricia McF.achern, Margaret 
McGahan. 

Fileen McGillicuddy, Patricia 
McGillvray, Karen McKim, Corine 
McNeice, Helen Nickle, Arthur 
Milmore, Mary Miller, Carol 
Minieucci, Sandra Montgomery, 
Judith Moore, Sandra Morgan, 
Dorothy Mullen, Marie Murphy, 
Maura Murray, Jeanne Nelligan, 
Alex Inn Nicklas, Marion Nelson, 
Barbara Norkus, Donna Noscworthy, 
Marily Novak, William O'Brien, 
Patricia O'Reilly, Maureen 

Remondini, Alice Rich, Dorothy 
Rockwood. 

Sylvia Rosen, Constance Rossini, 
Lydia Rubant, Larry Ryan, Shirley 
Schultze, Nicolas Scolomiero, Helen 
Shea, Irene Shea, Gcraldine Smith, 
Shirley Smith, Jean Smith, Lois 
Spector, Richard Speranzo, Maureen 
Sudduth, Rita Sullivan, Catherine 
Swan, Ruth Thicssen, Telli 
Thompson, John Vignoni, Barbara 
Vincent, Gertrude Walsh, Mary 
Walsh, Joan Whiffin, Paul Wirta. 

15 Year 

Ken Berry, Laurice Brow, Nancy 
Blanchard, Alice Briehta, Richard 
Brown, Audrey Burgess, Jeanette 
Carroll, Mary Ann Carroll, Helen 
Chancy, Karen Chiros, Maureen 
Cooke, Valerie Corwin, Patricia 
Coughlin, Ann Cummings, Marilyn 
Curtin, Jennie Davis, Philip Donnell, 
Marsha Farbcr, Angela I'errone, Lois 
Finn, Lena Flashman, Anna Gangi, 
Patricia Godfrey, Eleanor Gordon, 
Virginia Grasselli, Mary Harrington, 
George Horgan, Marilyn Hoyle, 
Jenney Ignani, Maddalena Janciscs, 
Monica Kclsch, Elizabeth Kirby. 

Jean Ladas, Olinda Lange, Joan 



Lind, Annette Lyons, Roland 
MacGillivray, Mary Mahoney, Marcia 
Maloney, Dorothy Manson, Fmmy 
Martinson, Adwilda Mathews, Helen 
Mclnnis, Mary Jane Mudge, Dorothy 
Olson, Gloria Partridge. Eleanor 
Pendleton, Edward Oueenan, Charles 
Queenan, Marie Romano, Regina 
Ross, Irene Shannon, Carole 
Scavuzzo, Agnes Shepard, Cora 
Spatola, Anne Stearns, Nancy Sylvia, 
William Tondini, Ilia Volpe, Joan 
Warmington, Dorothy Wassmouth, 
Mary White, Elizabeth Williams, 
Violet Wolfe. 

20 Year 

Mary Altleri, Theresa Anderson, 
Gwynne Bergstrom, F.rncstine 
Calcagno, Catherine Caldwell, 
Carmela Cocio, Regina Carnathan, 
Harold Darrow, Helen D'ltalia, 
Josephine Dellongo, Jean DesRosiers, 
Nancy Douglas, Dora Giagrande, 
Emma Hassan, Mary Magee, Bertha 
Magnes, Lillian McLaughlin, Marion 
Morse, Helen Mina, Barbara Newell, 
Richard Parsons, Helen Roy. 
Michaeline Russell, Ann Tabor, Mary 
Thomas, Alice Trubiano, Louis 
Varrasso, Beverley White, Donald 
Wilkinson. Emily Winquist. William 
Wood. 

25 Year 

Sara AJlie, Grace Barry, Elizabeth 
Collins, Louis DiDonatis, Felice 
Daru, Janet Harrington, Theresa 
Lorito, Ruth Lundin, Helene Meehl, 
Ann Pemberton, Mina Wossetti. 

30 Year 

James Cavicci, Adelaide Chapman, 
Veronica Franio, Mary McCullough, 
Virginia Norling, Maria O'Connell. 

35 Year 

Kenneth Leavitt, Ida Palestrini. 



Central Ninth Graders 
Hold Teachers' Reception 



Members of the ninth grade 
executive board at Central Junior 
High School recently held a 
reception for teachers who were 
members of the staff at the school 
during the past three years. 

Many teachers who are no 
longer members of the Central 
staff, including Mario Casale, 
Gloria Volpini and Ruth 
Higginbotham, joined in the 
festivities in the media center, 
where punch and pastries were 
served. 

Hospitality was handled by Jean 
Shea, Deborah Mallory, Lauren 
O'Rourke, Kerry Gannon, Vicker 
DiGravio, Bernadette Murphy, 
Suzanne Picard. Julie Nee, 
Carolyn Mercier and Mark 
Denneen, assisted by head 
counselor Mary Catherine 
lannoni. 

The Central yearbook staff held 

a special assembly to present the 

first copy to Mario Casali, who 

25 years as a teacher at the 



school, and to whom the yearbook 
was dedicated. 

The dedication reads: 

"This yearbook is proudly 
dedicated to Mr. Mario (Mike) 
Casali in grateful appreciation for 
his enormous contribution to 
'Central Spirit.' 

"Mr. Casali has given Central 
25 years of teaching, coaching, 
inspiration, help and friendship to 
all Central students. 

"Mr. Casali, you were a winner 
when you first came toCentralasa 
student. Now, after 25 years as a 
Central teacher, you leave once 
again a winner. Thanks, 'Mud', we 
love you." 

For the past year, Casali has 
been a counselor at Sterling Junior 
High School, but remained as 
basketball and baseball coach at 
Central. 

Awards to students were made 
at a recent graduation assembly. 
7 hey went to: 

Kerrv Gannon and Vicker 



DiGravio, American Legion 
award; Mark Denneen, Walsh 
award; Elaine Sugarman, 
Hallem Haddad Memorial Award 
for Enthusiasm in Science. 

Principal's awards fo r 
outstanding service to the school 
went to Robert Blaney, Nunzio 
Carbone, Ann Carroll. Maryellen 
Cordon, Michelle Dunn, Maura 
Feeney. Kristin Howard, Julian 
Macri, Jennifer McCauley, 
Carolyn Mercier, Julie Nee, 
Natalie Nigro, Jamie Paz, Suzanne 
Picard. John Ramsden, Terry 
Stark, Elizabeth Toland. 

Class presentations were made 
to Mary Catherine lannoni, head 
counselor, and Vincent Moscar- 
delli, principal. 

Student speakers on the 
program were Robyn Linehan, 
Elaine Sugarman, Maura Feeney 
and Mark Denneen. The welcome 
was given by Suzanne Nolan, 
president of the Class of 1981. 



Cancer Detection Class For Women Aug. 6 



Quincy women are invited to 
attend a lecture Aug. 6, at 7:30 
p.m. being held by the American 
Cancer Society for women of the 
Mormon Church and others 



interested in learning about breast 
self examination techniques. 

The lecture will be held at the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter 



Day Saints. 379 Gardner St., 
South Hingham. 

Dr. Peter Barrett, a specialist in 
cancer detection, will conduct the 
class. 



CALL ME BEFORE 
SOMETHING 



HAPPENS 



Joseph M. Doherty Insurance Agency. Inc. 
518 Hancock Street, Quincy. 472-1224 
LIFE • BUSINESS • PERSONAL AUTO 





Thursday, July JO, 1981 Quinry Sun Page II 



Quincy Couple's Relatives 
Injured In K.C. Hotel Collapse 



Patricia Mitchell On Dean's List 



Patricia M. Mitchell of Quincy, 
a senior at l.asell Junior College. 
Newton, has been named to that 



school's dean's list for academic 
achievement 



By NANCY McLAlGHLIN 

To many people, news of the 
July 17, collapse of the two "sky 
bridge" walkways across the lobby 
of the Hyatt Regency Hotel, 
Kansas City, Mo., was a sad and 
distressing news story, but not one 
that effected them personally. 

But to William Hancock and his 
wife, Lillian, of Viden Rd., South 
Quincy, the news was more than 
just another story among those 
seriously injured in the Collapse 
were Mr. Hancock's brother and 
sister-in-law. 

According to Mrs. Lillian 
Hancock, Harry L. Hancock and 
his wife Dorothy of Grandview, 
Mo., were at the year old Hyatt for 
their second Tea Dance, a weekly 
event. 

They paused to watch the 
festivities from a walkway which 
subsequently collapsed into a 
lower walkway and then the lobby. 

Over 100 people were killed in 
the collapse. The Hancock's were 
among the more than 100 injured. 

Mrs. Hancock was taken to St. 
Luke's Hospital with a broken leg, 
collar bone and right ankle, and 
cuts and lacerations on the ears 
and head. 

Mrs. Hancock was taken to St. 
Mary's Hospital with a compound 
fracture of the right leg, fractured 
ankle, and cuts and lacerations on 
the ears and head. 

Both are reported in stable 
condition. 

The William Hancocks heard 
the news the day after the collapse 
when a nephew called them from 
Missouri. 

"It was a terrible thing," said 
Mrs. Hancock, "my husband is all 
shook up." 

Mrs. Hancock said she and her 

Lt. Hodgkins 
Wins Wings 

Second Lt. Russell D. Hodgkins 
Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Russell D. 
Hodgkins. 37 Dixwell Ave., 
Quincy. has graduated from pilot 
training at Vance Air Force Base, 
Okla. 

He is assigned to Vance AFB as 
a full qualified T-38 instructor 
pilot. 




Dental 
Corner 

by 
Lee A. WelkyD.M.D. 

REPAIR OR REPLACE? 

Q: I've been wearing the same 
partial upper bridge for the last 
ten years, and it still fits me 
just fine. Now 1 have to have a 
front tooth extracted. Do I 
need a new bridge? 

A: If your old bridge really does 
fit you well enough, a new 
tooth tiui usually be welded on 
to the old framework. 

Q: I'm wearing a full denture on 
top that I've had for about 20 
years. It's kind of wobbly, but 
I get by. I'm trying to decide 
whether or not to get a new 
one. What do you think? 

A: These teeth have served you 
well, and would probably make 
an excellent "spare" set of 
teeth in an emergency, but new 
full denture would be a good 
idea to improve your comfort 
and chewing ability. 



Presented as a 
-community by 



service to the 



Lee A. WelkyD.M.D. 

234 Sea Street 
Quincy 
479-3030 



husband had visited Missouri just early 60's. 

last May. "It's going to take time for them 

She said her husband's brother lo recover from this, " said Mrs. 

and sister-in-law are both in their Hancock. 




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Obituaries 



Sister Madeleva 
Former St. Mary's Teacher 



A funeral Mass for Sister 
Madeleva (LeSagc) of Framing- 
ham, who taught for 25 years at 
St. Mary's School, West Quincy. 
was held Friday at Bethany 
Convent. 

Sister Madeleva died July 21. 
at Bethany Hospital after a long 
illness. 

She was born in Charlcstown 
and taught fourth grade at St. 
Mary's. Known for her love of 
Quincy. she was considered by 
students as one of the finest 
teachers at the school, according 
to sisters at St. Mary's. 

She also taught at Our Lady of 



Lourdcs and St. Thomas Schools 
in Jamaica Plain. 

Sister Madeleva retired four 
years ago to Fontbonne Hall, a 
retirement home for Sisters of St. 
Joseph. 

She is survived by a sister. 
Corinnc LeSagc of Quincy. 

A funeral Mass was celebrated 
by Rev. John J. McMahon, pastor 
of St. Mary's. Rev. James 
Langergan, also of St. Mary's, 
wasconcclebrant. 

Buria! was in St. Joseph's 
Cemetery. West Roxbury. 

Donations in her memory may 
be made to Sisters of St. Joseph, 
Bethany Hospital, Framingham. 



Mrs. Carol A. Lewis, 30 



A funeral Mass for Mrs. Carol 
A. (Russo) Lewis. 30, a lifelong 
Quincy resident who battled 
cancer for 16 years, was held July 
20, at St. John's Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. Lewis died July 16. at 
Deaconess Hospital. 

She was a graduate of Quincy 
public schools. 

Mrs. Lewis had been employed 
by New England Telephone Co., 
Braintree, until last October. 

Daughter of the late Mr. James 
A. Russo and Mrs. Alice 
(O'Brien) Russo, she is survived 



by her husband, Kevin Lewis; a 
son, Matthew Kevin Lewis; a 
brother, James A. Russo, Jr.. of 
Andover; and two sisters, Alice 
Messias of Scituate and Paula A. 
(Russo) McKeever of Lynnfield. 

Funeral arrangements were by 
Joseph Sweeney Funeral Home, 
74 Elm St. Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Contributions in her memory 
may be made to the Oncology 
Research Fund. New England 
Deaconess Hospital. 110 Francis 
St., Boston. 



Timothy Hawco, 95, 
Retired Rigger 



A funeral Mass lor I imothy 
Hawco. 95. of Quincy. a retired 
rigger for Bethlehem Steel 
Corporation, was held (Wednes- 
day) at St. Joseph's Church. 

Mr. Hawco died July 26. in 
Quincy Citv Hospital after a long 
illness. 

Born in Newfoundland, he had 
lived in Quincy for most of his life. 

Mr. Hawco was a life member of 



Give Heart Fund 

American Heart Association 



t. 



the Holy Name Society of St. 
Joseph's Church. 

Husband of the late Mrs. Anna 
(Armstrong) Hawco, he is survived 
by a son, Philip Hawco ol 
Weymouth; three daughters. 
Patricia Hosang. I.oretta Grant 
and Marjorie Pcttinelli. all of 
Quincy; a sister. Elizabeth Healey 
of Nova Scotia; 17 grandchildren 
and nine great grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were by 
Joseph Sweenev Funeral Home. 
74 Him St. Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemeterv. 



Parsons & Richardson 

INSURANCE AGENCY 
INC. 



'Be Sure Now - Not Sorry Later 

Robert W. Richardson 

PResident 3-1276 



Opposite Quincy 
Center MBTA 



I^awrenee R. Swain, 80, 
Retired Food Service Executive 



\ burial sen ice for 1 aurence R. 
Swam K0. of Wollaston. a retired 
food service executive for the Ritz- 
Carlton Hotel. Boston, will be held 
today (Thursday) at 1:15 p.m. in 
Blue Hill Cemetery. Braintree. 

Mi. Swain died Monday in a 
Boston hospital alter a brief 
illness. 

He had lived in Wollaston for 22 
years. 

Mr. Swain had been employed 
b\ the New Haven Railroad, 
dining car division and the H..I. 
Sciler Co.. of Boston, a food 
service concern, as well as the Ritz- 
C'arlton. 



Born in Hoboken. N..l..hewasa 
member ol Emmanuel Episcopal 
Church. Braintree. He was also a 
life member and former president 
of the International Food Service 
Executives' Association, formerly 
known as the Boston Stewards' 
Club, and was a 32nd degree 
Mason and a member of the Delta 
Masonic Lodge, Braintree. 

Husband of the late Mrs. Emma 
W. (Whitcomb) Swain, he is 
survived by two sons. Laurence R. 
Swain Jr. of Scituate and the Rev. 
Allen W. Swain of Monument 
Beach. Bourne, director of the 
Briarwood Episcopal Conference 



Center; and live grandchildren. 

A eucharistic memorial service 
will be held today ( I hursday) at 2 
p.m. in Emmanuel Episcopal 
Church. 519 Washington St., 
Braintree. The Rev. William E. 
O'Connell. rector, and the Rev. 
Swain will co-officiate. 

Visiting hours and flowers have 
been omitted. 

Donations in his memory may 
be made to the general fund of 
Emmanuel Episcopal Church. 

Funeral arrangements are under 
the direction of Mortimer N. Peck 
Funeral Home. 516 Washington 
St.. Braintree. 



William K. Robertson, 60, Sports Cartoonist 



A funeral service for William 
K. (Brob) Robertson, 60, of North 
Andover, former sports cartoonist 
for The Patriot Ledger, and 
Boston Herald Traveler was held 
Monday at St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church, North Andover. 

Mr. Robertson died July 23. in 
Lahey Clinic Medical Center, 
Burlington, after a long illness. 

He worked at The Patriot 
Ledger from 1955 to 1961. Mr. 
Robertson was also a sports 
cartoonist for the former Boston 
Herald Traveler during the earlv 
1970's. 

He worked from 1973 to 1976 as 
':,. » or a t D R ' Associates. 



Inc.. a Haverhill printing 
company. He retired in 1976. 

Born in Norfolk. Va., he had 
lived in Fast Weymouth before 
moving 14 years ago to North 
Andover. A graduate of Newton 
High School, he was also 
graduated from the Museum 
School of Fine Arts. Boston, and 
Tufts University. 

His memberships included the 
Vesper Country Club. Lowell, the 
Golf Writer's Association of 
America, the Harness Writers' 
Association of America, and the 
Baseball Writers' Association of 
America. 



He was an Armv veteran of 
World War II. 

He is survived by his wife. 
Helen (Smith) Robertson; two 
daughters. Tracy R. Howard of 
Bradford and Jody K. Robertson 
of North Andover; two brothers, 
Melville K. Robertson of Norfolk. 
Va.. and Richard Robertson of 
Virginia Beach, Va.; and a grand- 
daughter. 

Burial was in Ridgcwood 
Cemetery. North Andover. 

Donations in his memory may 
be made to the Cancer Research 
Fund, Lahey Clinic Foundation. 
Burlington. 



John G. Campbell, 49, Youth Hockey Director 



A funeral Mass for John G. 
Campbell. 49, of West Quincy, a 
sell-employed house painter, was 
held Monday at St. Mary's 
Church. 

Mr. Campbell died July 24, at 
Sidney Faber Cancer Institute. 
Boston. 

He came to West Quincy from 
Ireland 25 years ago. 

Mr. Campbell was a member of 
the Knights of Columbus and the 
Quincv Youth Hockey Board of 



Directors. 

Husband of Barbara A. 
(Magnuson) Campbell, he is 
survived by five sons. Michael 
Campbell. Edward Campbell. 
David Campbell. James Campbell 
and William Campbell, all of 
Quincy; a daughter, Marie 
Campbell of Quincy; his mother, 
Mary (O'Farrell) Campbell of 
Ireland; three brothers. Ralph 
Campbell of West Roxbury, 
Edward Campbell and Anthony 



Campbell, both of Ireland; lour 
sisters. June Craig of Dedham. 
Delores Sheehy of Waltham. 
Cecily Madden of West Roxbury 
and Marie Feelev of Ireland. 

Funeral arrangements were by 
Joseph Sweeney Funeral Home, 
326 Copeland St.. West Quincy. 
Burial was in in Pine Hill 
Cemeterv. West Quincy. 

Donations may be made to the 
Sidney Farber Cancer Clinic. 44 
Binnev St.. Boston. 



James J. McDonald, 65, Retired Machinist 



A funeral Mass for James J. 
McDonald. 65, a lifelong Quincy 
resident who was a retired 
machinist for Townsend Co., 
Braintree, will be held today 
(Thursday) at 9 a.m. at St. Mary's 
Church. West Quincy. 

Mr. McDonald died Sunday in 
Veterans Administration 



Hospital. Boston, after a long 
illness. 

He was a World War II Army 
veteran and a member of the 
George F. Bryan VFW Post. 

He is survived by a brother, 
Thomas M. McDonald of North 
Quincy; and three sisters, Mary A 
McDonald and Helen M . 



McDonnell, both of Quincy, and 
Catherine V. Haley of Wareham. 

Visiting hours were scheduled 
for 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. 
yesterday (Wednesday) at the 
Joseph Sweeney Funeral Home. 
326 Copeland St., West Quincy. 

Burial will be in St. Mary's 
Cemeterv. West Quincy. 



Ira Schwartz, 83, Retired Market Owner 



A funeral service for Ira 



H\^. MEMORIAL 
C3- GIFTS 



\ 



^\ Luiunoui »psirrn?nts altar 
\ bi, oh:, candits stoles 
sacred vessels Ht 



All Mcnonal gitls promptly 
aiemortaii 'Pd without charge 

A. E. GOODHUE CO. 

13 !5 School St., Quincy. 472 3090 




uieeneo funeral £>ztvitz 



DENNIS S. SWEENEY, Direct 
Non Sectarian 



or 






74 ELM ST. 
QUINCY 

773-2728 



326 COPELAND 
W. QUINCY 

773-2728 



Successor to M. Joseph Sweeney 
PARKINC. I A( ILII1I S 



Schwartz. 83, of Quincy, retired 
owner of Schwartz Kosher Meat 
Market, Mattapan, was held 
Sunday in Stanetsky-Schlossberg- 
Solomon Memorial Chapel, 
Brooklinc. 



Mr. Schwartz died July 23. at 
home. 

A native of Russia, he operated 
the market at 1200 Blue Hill Ave. , 
for 50 years. 

He was a member of the 
Hammct Masonic Lodge, Temple 
Beth Hillcl in Mattapan, and 
Temple Shalom of Milton for 30 
years. 

He formerly lived in Milton. 



He is survived by his wife. 
Florence (Nathanson) Schwartz; a 
son. Dr. Norman B. Schwartz of 
Sudbury; a brother. Louis 
Schwartz, of Weymouth; a sister, 
Lucille Wasserman of Milton; and 
two grandchildren. 

Cantor Irving Kischel of 
Temple Shalom officiated at the 
service. Burial was in Congrega- 
tiona Kehillath Jacob Cemetery, 
West Roxbury. 

Memorial week was to be 
observed at the home of Dr. 
Norman Schwartz, 69 Barton 
Drive, Sudbury. 

Donations in his memory may 
be made to any charity. 



leuiare 
Srottjera 

FUNERAL HOME and CHAPELS 




Donald M. Deware 

Director 



576 Hancock Street, Quincy 
Tel: 472-1 137 

Non-Sectarian 
Services rendered to any distance 

39 yeais under same Ownership and Directorship 



Ihursda), July JO, 1981 Quinc) Sun Page 13 



Last Graduating Class 

35 Graduated From Vo-Tech 
Practical Nursing Program 

Thirty-five nursing students 
pledged to devote themselves to 
the welfare of those committed to 
their care at the final 
commencement exercises of 
Quincy Vocational Technical 
School's Practical Nursing 
Program. 

This fall, nursing students will 
attend Quincy Junior College. 

Graduated at the ceremonies 
held at North Quincy High 
School's auditorium were: Nancy 
J, Benoit. Michele J. Braver, 
Denise Cartolano, Diane Colligan. 
Anet DeCola. Susan M. DeSantis. 
Margaret Downey, Jacquelyn 
Doyle. Julia A. Doyle. Kathleen 
A. Faiella. Anne E. Finneran, 
Doris A. Flanigan. Karen E. 
Hakala, l.inda Holbrook, Yvonne 
Koelsch. I.vette M. Lank. Thelma 
E. Litchfield, Susan L, Mclver, 
Maureen A. McNally. Pamela A. 
Mooncy. Elaine V. Nave. Janice 
M. O'Neil, Dianne C. Peckham. 
Susan Peters, Mary M. Pitts, Alice 
J. Reid. Donna M. Ruggiero, 
Ellen M.Simmons, Kimbcrly llene 
Smith. Diane L. Sousouris. Mary 
A. Stewart, Patricia A. Sullivan, 
Marion E. Sylvester, Tina L. 
Wilkinson and Janice L, Wunder. 

Mrs. Wunder of Weymouth, 
was married just hours before the 
commencement. 

Rev Kenneth Lehman, pastor 
of Atlantic United Methodist 




FAMILY TRADITION, Tina Wilkinson of Quincy (left) was recently 
graduated from Quincy Vocational Technical School's Practical Nursing 
Program, following in footsteps of two sisters. Presenting her diploma is 
Patricia Toland of the Quincy School Committee. At rear are School 
Committee members Vice Chairman Christopher F. Kennedy, (left) and 
Committeeman John Sullivan. (Quincy Sun Phou, by Dave Gltlooly) 



Church, gave the invocation. 

Christopher F. Kennedy, vice 
chairman of the Quincy School 
Committee, presided over the 
commencement. 

Edward T. Hannon, acting 
director of Quincy Vocational 
Technical School, gave the 
welcome. 

Dianne Carbonneau. soloist, 
presented musical selections 



accompanied by Thomas Voz/ella. 

The commencement address 
was given by Carl R. Deyeso, 
director of academic education for 
the Quincy Public Schools. 

School superintendent Dr. 
Lawrence P. Creedon presented 
the class. 

Graduate Nancy J. Benoit gave 
remarks. Kimberly Smith led the 
graduating class in the Nightingale 
Pledge. 



Vacation Bible School At Faith Lutheran 



Faith Lutheran Church will 
sponsor a one-week vacation Bible 
School program at Faith Lutheran 
Center. 65 Roberts St.. August 3-7 
from 9 a.m. to noon. 

The theme is "Promises. 



Promises - from God!". The school 
will offer Bible studies, music. 

crafts, recreation and snacks plus a 
cookout for the families of the 
students on Friday. 



Classes are open tochildren who 
will be entering nursery through 
grade 7 in the fall. 

For more information or to 
register, call 472-1247 mornings. 



Squantum Church Continues Sermon Series 



The series of sermons based on 
the Book of Revelations continued 
Sunday at The First Church of 
Squantum when Rev. Dr. Gene 
Langevin, Pastor, preached on 
"I he Final Conflict: Armaged- 
don." 

Previous sermons in this series 

Receive Degrees 

Judith L. Lafleur and Steven R. 
Bonoli. both of Quincy, were 
among 607 students awarded 
degrees recently at the 110th 
commencement of Plymouth 
State College in New Hampshire. 
Miss Lafleur was graduated 



have been: June 28. "Can This 
Book Be For Us?"; July 5. "The 
Conquering Lamb"; July 12, 'The 
Prayers of the Saints"; and July 19, 
"Seeing The Beasts That There 
Are." 

Next Sunday's sermon will be 
"Watching Babylon Fall". The 
final sermon Aug. 30, will be "The 

From Plymouth Stale 

magna cum laude. 

Wollaston Church 
of the fiNazarene 



Coming New Heaven and Earth." 




INDOORFLAGS OUTDOOR 

State ACCESSORIES Church 

Flags Flags of All Nations Flags 

FLAGS MADE TO ORDER 

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WoUaston. Mass. D2 1 70 4 72-824 2 




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Wednesday- 7:00 p.m. 

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people do. Reasons range 
from broken homes to 
unbroken habits. What- 
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both the fact of having 
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158 Washington Street 

QUINCY 
...A church where something 

"WONDKRHT." happens 
even Sunday! 

The Church... 

...in Stud) 9:30 a.m. 

...in Worship 10:45 p.m. 

...in Celebration 6:30 p.m. 

...Come... be a part. ..help us 
Crow! 




STATE HOUSE TOl R - Cub Scouts from Troop 27. Pack 8. Sacred 
Heart School North Quincy, were welcomed to the State House recentl) 
by Senator Paul D. Harold. From left Martha Campbell, a chaperone, 
Brian Glennon, Jeff Campbell, Kevin Glennon, Danny Gilmartin, 
Anthon> LeMay, Senator Harold and Den Mother, Mrs. Michele 
Glennon. 

Youth Commission Sponsoring 
Rent-A-Kid Program 



The Quincy Youth Commission 
is sponsoring a Rent-a-kid 
program for young people ages 1 1 
to 15 years. 

Applications for this program 
can be obtained at the Youth 
Commission office, 1 120 Hancock 
St., Quincy. 



Once applications are filed, the 
youth staff will refer these young 
people to job openings in the area 
such as: yard work, house work. 
and babysitting. 

For more information on this 
program, call Susan Kelleher at 
773-1380 ext. 479. 



GARDENS 



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Pa(» 14 Quinc) Sun Thursday Jul) M, 1981 



Office, Pre-School Equipment Auction 



The Quincy YMCA and 
Weymouth Planning Board will 



conduct a sealed bid joint auction 
of office and pre-school equip- 



$pSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS^>^ aS^g 

Mzaiz £>t. 
3\b\\ flarket 

35Yearsat35BealeSt. 

• Fresh Seafoods Daily 

• Cooked Seafoods 

• Eat in-or out 



Fresh ColeSlaw & Potatoe Salad 85* lb. 
Fresh Lobster Meat $1 4.95 lb. 

Fresh Crabmeat Salad Roll $2.15 each 

Stuffed Flounder with Newburg Sauce 
or 
Baked Haddock with Lemon Butter Each served with 
French Fries or Potato Salad. $1.95 



Wollaston 479-0039 



ment Friday at 4 p.m. at the 
Weymouth YMCA, 203 Middle 
St. 

The material to be auctioned 
was to be available for viewing 
yesterday. (Wednesday) through 
Friday, 2 to 4 p.m. 

The Quincy YMCA will auction 
equipment including three office 
desks, a four-drawer file cabinet, 
chairs, tables and other items. 

The pre-school equipment was 
utilized until recently by the 
Weymouth YMCA Day Care 
Program. 

It is made up of 24 lots 
including children's tables and 
chairs, musical instruments, 
wooden toys, story books, fish 
tank, bulletin boards and black- 
boards, and other items. 

Sealed bids will be read aloud 
at the auction. 

For more information or written 
description of the auction items, 
contact Paul Harvey, 479-8500, 
concerning the Quincy YMCA 
equipment, Alan Perrault or 
Joseph Nugent, 335-2000, ext. 15. 
regarding the pre-school 
equipment. 



Dr. Joseh Nicastro Asst. Supt. 
King Philip Regional District 



Dr. Joseph S. Nicastro of 
Quincy was recently appointed 
assistant superintendent of the 
King Philip Regional School 
District. Wrentham. 

The district consists of the towns 
of Plainville, Norfolk and 
Wrentham. 

In addition to his new duties. 
Dr. Nicastro will also keep his 
positions as director of the King 
Philip Regional Vocational High 
School and director of Adult 
Continuing Education of the King 
Philip Regional School District. 
He has been employed there for the 
past nine years. 

Prior to his employment ir 
Wrentham. Dr. Nicastro wa> 
employed in the Quincy Schoo! 
System for 20 years at various 
administrative and teaching 
positions. 




DR. JOSEPH S. NICASTRO 

Dr. Nicastro and his wife 
Josephine (Gambino) who reside 
at 45 Edison St. Quincy. are 
parents of Joseph C, Dean Paul, 
Susan Mary, and John Paul. 



O'Connells Move To Join 
In Marina Development 






Effective August 1st 

The LEADER does it again! 

Announcing new 
higher interest 

rates on Vk year 

term certificates! 



EFFECTIVE 

ANNUAL 

YIELD 







Act now to receive a guaranteedYate for 30 months on your 
investment. You'll receive this high rate of return no matter what 
the economy does. Remember, your interest is compounded 
continuously. Early with- 
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only with the consent of the 
Bank. Federal regulations 
require a substantial penalty 
for early withdra wal. 



We always pay the highest 
interest rates allowed by law. 
All deposits insured in full. 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

- "ALWAYS THE LEADER" 



RATE 

EFFECTIVE 
AUGUST 1ST 

THRU 3RD 

$1000 MINIMUM 
DEPOSIT 



MAW OFFICE: 

460 Wett Broadway 
South Botton 

9am lo3 30pm — 
Monday thru Friday 
Saturday — 10 a m to 1 p m 
Call 268-2500 

NEPONSET CIRCLE OFFICE: 
740 Gellivan Boulevard 
8 30a m to 5 30pm — 
Monday. Tuesday 
Wednesday & Friday 
Thursday — 8 30 am to730pm 
Saturday — 8 30 a m to 12 Noon 

QUINCY OFFICE 

690 Mm Street, 
Lekln Square 

Monday Tuesday. Wednesday. 
Thursday 830am loSpm 
Friday 830am to 7pm 
Saturday — 8 30 a m to 12 Noon 



Peter and William O'Connell of 
OBC, Inc., the construction 
company, are negotiating to join 
Marina Industries in developing 
the old Squantum Naval Air 
Station land. 

"There is a good chance we will," 
said Peter O'Connell, "but it is 
kind of premature to talk about it 
now. We are working out the 
details. A month from now we will 
either be with it or we won't." 

O'Connell described the deal as 
a "restructuring of the ownership" 
of Marina Industries Inc., which 
leases the old airfield land from 
Boston Edison. 

"The Marina will be expanded 
to include us," he said, "that means 
Peter and William, not OBC, Inc." 

Marina Industries is currently 
planning to build 142 units of 
condominium on the easternly side 
of the land. OBC, Inc., is 50 per 
cent owner of the project and the 
builder. 

The development has received 
the approval of the City Council 
under Planned Unit Development 
with 15 restrictive amendments. 

One of the amendments specifies 
that a second access road in 
addition to East Squantum St. 
must be obtained for the project 
and negotiations are underway to 
secure Commander Shea Blvd. 
from Jordan Marsh. 

4 Residents 
Accepted For 

College Academy 

Four Quincy students have been 
accepted into College Academy 
this summer. 

They are Robert Mitchell, 1344 
Quincy Shore Drive, Majorie 
Swanton, 10 Samoset Ave., 
Vincent DiGiacomo, 110 
Lancaster St., and Anthony 
Rugnetta 1060 Furnace Brook 
Pkwy. 

The academy is designed to meet 
the intellectual needs of gifted and 
academical talented children in 
grades four through eight. 

Patricia Howe 

On Dean's List 

Patricia Howe, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Larry Scarnici of 24 
Sunnyside Rd.. West Quincy, was 
named to the dean's list for the fall 
and spring semesters at Salem 
State College. 

A nursing student, she was a 
member of the college's swim 
team. 

Stone In Basic Training 

Eric Stone, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
.lason J. Stone of 243 Holbrook 
Rd., Montclair. a 1981 graduateof 
Quincy Voc Tech School, has left 
for Air Force basic training at 
Lackland AFB. San Antonio. 
Texas. 



Thursday, July 30, 19*1 Quincy Sun Page IS 



Out Of Title Contention 

Morrisette Bows 
To Hingham 

12-0 In Finale 



Morrisette Legion's baseball 
team, failing again to win its 22nd 
Zone 6 championship, ended its 
season Monday night by losing to 
Hingham, 2-0, and finishing with 
a 13-9 record. 

Morrisette finished two games 
behind Weymouth (15-7). 

Morrisette was held to four hits 
by John Beatey, who out-pitched 
Paul Earle. Earle, after giving up 
both runs in the second inning, 
pitched a fine game, allowing 
seven hits and striking out 10. 

Hingham scored both runs in 
the second when Steve Gilbert 
walked, Beatey singled, Dave 
Rohrer singled to fill the bases, 
Dan Morrison singled home 
Gilbert and Mike Lynch walked to 
force in the second run. 

Sunday night Morrisette had 
one of its best games of the entire 
season, bombing defending state 
champion Brockton, 13-2, behind 
the four-hit pitching of Gary 
DiNardo. Mike Marshall pitched 
the last inning. 

Morrisette scored a run in the 
first on a walk to Dan Boyle, who 
stole second, and Mark Millane's 
single. It added three in the 
second on a walk to Bob Beniers, 
DiNardo's single and three 
errors. 

In the third Beniers hit a two- 
run homer and DiNardo tripled 
and scored on a wild pitch. 

Morrisette exploded for six 
runs in the fifth on three hits, a 
walk, three errors and several 
wild pitches and passed balls. 

Beniers had two hits and drove 
in three runs, Millane had two 
hits and two RBI and DiNardo two 
hits and an RBI. 

Last Sunday, in the continua- 
tion of a protested game, 
Morrisette topped Norwell, 4-3. 
Norwell had previously been 
credited with a 4-3 win, but 
Morrisette won its protest of an 
umpire's decision dealing with a 
ground rule and the game was 
started in the sixth inning with 
the score tied 3-3. Morrisette 
scored the winning run in the 
seventh when DiNardo singled, 
was bunted along by Marty 
McLoughlin, went to third on an 



error and scored on Kevin 
Howlett's long sacrifice fly. 

Beniers made a great running 
catch on a fly in the bottom half of 
the inning with a man on base. 
DiNardo was the winning pitcher. 

Last Friday night Morrisette 
edged Milton, 1-0, in 10 innings 
in one of the finest played games 
of the season. 

Millane was the winning 
pitcher, allowing four hits and 
striking out eight, while loser 
Matt Regan also pitched 
brilliantly, giving up four hits and 
striking out five. 

Morrisette scored the winning 
run when Howlett singled, Steve 
Pecevich reached on an error and 
Dan Boyle singled home Howlett. 
Jim O'Toole made two out- 
standing plays at second base. 

Wollaston, finishing up strong 
as it did a year ago, won four of its 
last five games. 

Wollaston defeated Milton, 
7-4. as Bob Bolster relieved 
starting pitcher Rich Hallberg 
and retired the three batters he 
faced. Hallberg struck out six and 
gave up five hits in six innings. 
Wollaston scored three runs in 
the first as Mike Venne led off 
with a walk, Mark Righini, who 
had two hits, singled, both 
runners scored on John 
Kavanaugh's triple and Steve 
Healy, who had two hits, singled 
Kavanaugh home. 

Wollaston scored two more in 
the second on Jim Sullivan's two- 
run double and added two in the 
fourth. 

Wollaston walloped Norwell, 
13-2, with Sullivan having four 
hits and six RBI. Steve Belcastro 
had three hits, while Righini, Gus 
Gonsalves and Healy had two hits 
each. Righini scored four runs. 
Jim Kelly and Healy combined to 
hold Norwell to three hits, with 
Healy the winner. 

» TOM SULLIVAN 



Save Gas and Money . 
. . . Shop Locally 



i 

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Jack Garrity Hockey Clinic 

Sponsored by Quincy Youth Arena Every Sunday Evening 
during the Month of August. 7:50 p.m. • 9:30 p.m. 

Registrations Are Limited. Varsity and J.V. Players Only. 
Register at Quincy Youth Arena. 

Cost $35.00 

Mail Check to Q.Y.A., P.O. Box 751 
Quincy, Mass. 02169 or Call 479-8371 



AIR CONDITIONED 

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170 Quincy Ave. 472-3597 
Summer Prices 



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THE CELTICS RECENTLY completed their first season in the Quincy Youth Soccer League, competing in 
the Grades 1 and 2 division. Front, left to right, Robin Praetsch, Christine Welsh, Danielle lacobucci, 
Eleanor Ryan, Katie McDonough, Jennifer Kay, Suzanne Harrington and Maureen Fewer. Second row, 
Audra Burnett, Holly Soderstrom, Diane IMonteith, Stephanie Olsen, Destine Ryan, Amy Bertrand, 
Jeannie Manning and Mary Ellen Cameron. Back, assistant coaches Bob Olsen, Bob lacobucci and Dick 
Fewer and head coach Dave Bertrand. 

(Photo by Rick Prarlnch) 



Sun Sports 

Legion All Stars In 
MDA Benefit Game Monday 



The Zone 6 and 6A American 
Legion baseball all-star teams will 
meet Monday night at 7:30 at 
Adams Field for the benefit of the 
Muscular Dystrophy Association. 

Tickets can be obtained at the 
Quincy Sun office or by calling 
ticket chairman John Doucette at 
472-9193. 

The Zone 6 stars will include 
Gary DiNardo, Mark Millane and 
Brian Reale of Morrisette; Jamie 



Walsh and John Costigan of 
Quincy; John Hancock, Rich 
Devin, Bob Guillemette and 
Kevin Croker of Brockton; Rick 
Roach, John Beatey and Paul 
Morrison of Hingham; Brian 
Smith, Mike Conville and Dan 
Ronaghan of Weymouth and 
Kevin Pizzi. Paul Gammel and 
Rollie Belyea of Norwell. 

The Zone 6A stars include 
players from Wollaston, Brain- 



tree, Randolph, Canton, Holbrook 
and Milton. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building 
a Quincy Sun home 
delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



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MOST STORES HONOR 









I'igf 16 Quinc> Sun Thursday. July 30. 1981 



Track Club Relay 

Qualify Teams 
For National Meet 



Junior League 

Boston Gear Wins 
3 Straight To Qualify 



With the results in from the 
other New England states in the 
Hershey Youth Program, the 
Quincy Track Club wound up 
qualifying eight athletes for the 
National meet in West Virginia in 
the form of two relay teams. 

Qualifying are the 9-10 girls 
team of Marta Martinez, Robin 
Guilfoy. Deirdre Murphy and 
Karen Cashman, and the 11-12 
boys team of Jamie McArdle. 
Mark Lunnin, Stuart Coull and 
Mike Rugnetta. 

The QIC made an outstanding 
showing last week in the Waltham 
Track Club Invitational meet with 
April Hamilton the star of the day. 
The 8-year-older jumped 11-2 in 
the long jump to set a meet record 
for 9-under girls. 

Mike Petta and Laura Ciulla 
scored a pair of impressive 
victories and Nancy Sullivan and 
Harry Morash turned in excellent 
performances in the distance runs. 

In 9-under boys Chris 
DiGiacomo took third in the 100 
and in 9-under girls Jill McLellan 
took third in the long jump and 
Meghan Farrell third in the 
softball throw. 

In 10-11 boys Sean Hunter and 
Tony Rugnetta were 2-3 in the long 
jump. Petta won the 100 in 12.98 



with Hunter and Rugnetta 2-3, 
Petta won the440 and Tom Walsh, 
Paul Scola and John Dundcrdale 
swept the 880. In the girls events 
Corinne Rad/evich took second in 
the long jump. Tricia Giannandrea 
took third in the 220 and Patty 
Feeney and Martinez were 1-3 in 
the 440. 

In boys 12-13 McArdle won the 
long jump, took second in the 220 
and third in the 100, Lunnin took 
second in the shot and Morash 
won the 880 in 2:34.8. In girls 
events Marie D'Attilio took 
second in the long jump, Tracy 
Parker and Mary Beth Bonner 
took I -3 in the high jump, Noreen 
Connolly, Tracy Fostello and 
Denise McLellan swept the shot 
put, Ciulla won the 100 in 12.05 
and also won the 220 and Nancy 
Sullivan outkicked the field with a 
lap to go to win the 880 in 2.36.0. 

In 14-17 boys Mike Williams 
took second in the 440 and long 
jump and in girls events Julie 
Supple took third in the high jump 
and Georgia Traficante third in the 
shot put. 

Next week 15 members of the 
QTC will be in Los Angeles for the 
Arco Jesse Owens games. The club 
will also compete in the Brockton 
Summerfest next week. 



Boston Gear, the National 
League champion, bounced back 
from an opening loss to Kiwanis 
to win three straight games and 
qualify for the finals of the Junior 
Baseball League playoffs. 

Foley Chrysler- Plymouth, the 
American League champ with the 
best record in either league, 
moved into the semifinal round 
and faced Kiwanis. the surprise 
team of the playoffs, Tuesday 
night. The Foley-Kiwanis winner 
will face Gear tonight (Thursday) 
at 6 o'clock at McCoy Field for the 
city championship. 

After being walloped by 
Kiwanis, 9-2, in the playoff 
opener, Gear came back to defeat 
Burgin Platner, 7-3, with Larry 
Taglieri the winning pitcher. 
Gear's attack was led by Nancy 
Flukes with three singles and five 
RBI, Chad Hallett had two singles 
and Ricky Dunham, Tad Sheets, 
Taglieri and Shawn Craig a single 
each. Paul Adams, Mike Cronin, 
Mike Leonard, Chris Higgins and 
Mike Paccetti all played well for 
Gear. Playing well for Burgin 
were Robbie McDonald, who had 
three hits and sparkled at short- 
stop and Tom McDonald and 
Bryan Mosher. who had two hits 
each. 

Gear then edged Sears, 1-0, in 
one of the finest games of the 



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year as both teams played 
errorless ball. Mike Dever of Gear 
had a no-hitter for five innings 
until Matt Raymond singled. The 
game was scoreless at the end of 
regulation time. In the top of the 
seventh, Hallett singled, Craig 
walked and Flukes singled in the 
winning run. In the bottom half 
Hallett, the regular catcher, 
pitched in his first game all 
season and struck out the side. 
Taglieri had two singles and Matt 
Furtado, Hallett, Craig and 
Flukes one each. Flukes drove in 
the winning run for the second 
time in three games. Higgins, 
Adams, Paccetti, Furtado. 
Sheets, Leonard, and Dunham 
stood out on defense. Tom 
Callahan pitched an outstanding 
game for Sears and Bob Hubbard 
and Bob Austin, who alternated 
at second base, played strong 
defense. 

Gear moved into the finals with 
a 2-1 win Monday night over 
Kiwanis, with winning pitcher 
Taglieri striking out six including 
the final three batters with the 
tying and winning runs on base. 
He allowed six hits and walked 
five. Taglieri had a double, 
Leonard a double and Flukes and 
Dunham singles. 

Furtado was the anchor on 
defense for Gear with several 
spectacular catches in the out- 
field, while Higgins, Adams, 
Sheets, Hallett, Craig, Paccetti. 
Dever and Joe Gendreau, who 
had to leave the game with an 
injury, all played strong games. 
T. J. Steen pitched an out- 
standing game for Kiwanis, 
giving up only four hits. Matt 
Hurley had two hits for Kiwanis 
and Ron Fletcher, Dennis 
DeCoste, Chris Riccuiti and 
Tommy Reilly one each. Paul 
Connolly and Billy Bellew played 



well. 

Foley advanced to the semi- 
finals with a 9-4 victory over 
Rotary. Chris Marshall pitched 
six-hit ball, struck out six and 
walked four for his second playoff 
win. He also singled, walked and 
scored two runs. Dan Biagini had 
a home run and single, Tom 
Tagen a run-scoring triple, Kyle 
Robertson a double (also played a 
strong game behind the plate), 
and Bob Laracy, Sean Gately and 
Kevin Duffy a single each. Duffy, 
for the second game in a row, 
made a great catch in centerfield 
to rob John Pennellatore of a sure 
home run. Pennellatore later hit a 
homer and also had a single. 

Previous to its tough loss to 
Gear, Kiwanis, which finished 
with a 12-10 record and was 
seeded fifth in the playoffs, had 
upset Gear and Rotary, which had 
finished 18-4 in the National 
League (Gear topped Rotary in a 
playoff for the National League 
title). 

In its first game Kiwanis 
surprised Gear, 9-2, beating 
previously unbeaten Mike Dever, 
who had a 10-0 record going into 
the game. Riccuiti led the 
Kiwanis attack with a long homer 
over the center field fence, a 
double and a single. DeCoste and 
Hurley had two hits each. 
Fletcher ended the game by 
starting an around the horn 
double play and Steen was the 
winning pitcher, going all the 
way. 

Kiwanis then upset Rotary, 6-2, 
with Eddie Flavin pitching a two- 
hitter. Riccuiti, Fletcher and 
Flavin had two hits apiece and 
Ronnie Hersey had one. Steen 
made an excellent running catch 
in left-center to squelch a Rotary 
rally. Billy Burkhead pitched well 
for Rotary. 



Leone 10th In 
Youth Golf Classic 



Jack Leone, former outstanding 
North Quincy High golfer, 
trackman and football player, shot 
an 80-73-153 in the recent 
Massachusetts Insurance Youth 
Golf Classic at Amherst, finishing 
10th. 

Leone missed by two strokes of 
qualifying for the National 
Insurance Youth Classic Aug. 7-1 1 
in Augusta. Ga. Brian Stewart of 
Plymouth won the Mass. event 



with a 69-75-144 and will bejoined 
by Guy Newton (147) of Milford. 
N.H.; Mike Stone (148) of New 
Bedford, John Whouley (150) of 
Belmont, Kevin Rourke (150) of 
Danvers. Kevin Quinn (150) of 
Northboro, Fran Quinn (151) of 
Northboro and Steve O'Neil ( 151) 
of Halifax in the Nationals. 

Edward Reilly of Quincy shot an 
80--85-I65 in the Massachusetts 
tournament. 



Propane Gas 

Cylinders filled on our premises 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Charmglow gas grills & accessories 
Available at special low prices 

South Shore Heating 
and Air Conditioning Inc. 

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Thursday, July 30, I9SI Quincy Sun Page 17 



i r ": 



Quincy Man 
Competing In 

Martial Art Games 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Quincy's Michael O'Malley, 
the first American to win four 
gold medals in the National AAU 
Tae Kwon Do martial art 
championships, is in Santa Clara, 
Calif. , this week competing in the 
World Games. 

O'Malley, who is in the welter- 
weight division, will travel to 
Korea in October to try for the 
world championship. 

Tae kwon do is the only martial 
art that has received recognition by 
the Olympic Committee and is 
being strongly considered for 
inclusion in the 1984 Olympic 
competition. In addition, 
President Reagan has expressed 
his support for tae kwon do and for 
Americans who are vying for the 
world championship. 

"We feel Michael has an 
, excellent chance of bringing the 
world championship to the United 
States," said Nicolai Diatchenko, 
who is connected with the Jae Hun 
Kim Institute of Boston, where 
O'Malley is a full-time instructor. 
Mike also is a part-time instructor 
at Boston University. 

O'Malley born and raised in 
Boston but a Quincy resident for 
several years, won the welterweight 
title in the fourth annual AAU Tae 
Kwon Do Tournament in 
Washington in 1978, repeated in 
the nationals in Dayton, Ohio in 
1979 and was named "Fighter of 
the Year," and won again in the 
nationals in Berkeley, Calif., last 
year and won the Ken Min Award. 

O'Malley took first place in the 
Pan American championships last 
year in Houston. The U.S. team 
won six of a possible ten gold 



medals in the tournament and it 
marked the first time a U.S. team 
came out on top in the overall 
standings in a major international 
event. 

O'Malley began studying the art 
10 years ago when he was 14, after 
visiting the J.H. Kim Tae Kwon 
Do Institute in Boston. His 
attraction to the art and instructor 
Jae Hun Kim was both immediate 
and overwhelming. 

"1 had always been interested in 
the martial arts, but tae kwon do 
completely enveloped me," he said. 
"And Mr. Kim had so much to 
offer. He is one of the few Koreans 
I know who has graduated from 
both MIT and Harvard. With his 
analytical approach from his 
studies of physics and business- 
combined with the knowledge of 
tae kwon do he learned in Korea — 
Kim has a very unique method of 
teaching. Plus he's a very 
personable man. There are many 
instructors you like right off the 
bat. Mr. Kim is one you love. Our 
relationship goes beyond that of 
student and instructor -he's almost 
like a father." 

Tae kwon do makes a lot of 
demands on O'Malley's time, but 
he gives it gladly. He teaches five to 
six classes daily, seven days a week 
at Kim's institute. 

"1 would like to see tae kwon do 
get accepted in the 1984 olympics- 
that's been one of my long standing 
goals," he said. "Acceptance would 
lend us a little more prestige. Right 
now my goal is to win the world 
championship. No American has 
ever won a gold medal there. Many 
people say I have a good chance 
and I'd like to live up to their 
expectations." 



State Street Moves Up 



The State Street Bank handed 
Hancock Bank its second straight 
defeat last week, 1 1-10, to move to 
within one game of Hancock in the 
South Shore Bankers Softball 
league. 

Brian Croke and Jack Mahoney 
had home runs and Mike Gerrish 
had three hits for Bill Sims' State 
Street team. Terry McCormack 
had a three-run homer and Al 
Sassi a bases-loaded triple for 



Charlie Cahill's Hancock club. 

Last week's other results: South 
Shore Bank 9. Bay Bank/ Norfolk 
8, and Quincy Savings Bank 13, 
Quincy Co-Operative 1. 

The standings: Hancock Bank, 
10-2; State Street Bank, 9-3; South 
Weymouth Savings, 7-5; Bay 
Bank/ Norfolk, 5-6; South Shore 
Bank, 5-7; Quincy Savings Bank, 
4-7, and Quincy Co-Operative, I- 
II. 



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STUDENTS from Quincy High School's Marine Technology course, part of the Industrial Arts Program, 
recently built 16 and 18 foot boats. From left, seated, are students who worked on the boats Kevin Breen, 
Steve Kamb, who owns t|e boat, and John Clark; Peter l.ind, industrial arts instructor; students Matt 
Taylor, and Robin Lotti, boat owner. Standing are Principal Lloyd Hill (left) and Edward Hannon (right) 
director of career education. 

((Juincy Sun Phnlo by Rick \lallhou*l 

Beach Swimming Schedule 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department announces the 
following schedule of swimming 
instructions for the city's beaches 
during the week of Aug. 3 to 7. 

Monday, Aug. 3, beach hours 
are 12 to 5 and high tide is 2:32. 
The schedule: non-swimmer 1, 12; 
non-swimmer 11, 12:30; beginner 1, 
4; beginner II, 4:30; advanced 
beginner, 3:30; intermediate, 1; 
swimmer, 1:30; basic rescue 
advanced life saving, 2-3. 

Tuesday, Aug. 4, beach hours 
are 12:30 to 5:30 and high tide is 
3:17. The schedule: non-swimmer 
1, 12:30; non-swimmer II, I; 
beginner I, 4:30; beginner II, 5; 
advanced beginner, 1:30; 
intermediate, 2; swimmer 4; basic 
rescue advanced life saving, 2:30-4. 
Wednesday, Aug. 5, beach 
hours are I to 6 and high tide is 
4:03. The schedule: non-swimmer 
1, I; non-swimmer II, 1:30; 
beginner I, 5; beginner II, 5:30; 
advanced beginner, 4:30; 



intermediate, 2; swimmer, 2:30; 
basic rescue advanced life saving, 
3-4:30. 

Thursday, Aug. 6\ beach hours 
are 2 to 7 and high tide is 4:50. The 
schedule: non-swimmer I, 2; non- 
swimmer II, 2:30; beginner I, 3; 
beginner II, 3:30; advanced 
beginner 4- '" , P r mediate. 4-W; 
swimmer, 6:30; basic rescue 
advanced life saving, 5-6:30. 



Attorney Services 

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175 Quincy Shore 328-6545 
Drive, Quincy 

< B oor r „ns,.. 848-6272 

General Practice 

Criminal & Family Law 

Personal Injury Claims 

Real Estate 

Wills & Trusts 

NO CHARGE FOR FIRST 
OFFICE VISIT 



Friday, Aug. 7, beach hours are 
3 to 8 and high tide is 5:39. The 
schedule: non-swimmer I, 3; non- 
swimmer II, 3:30; beginner I, 4; 
beginner II, 4:30; advanced 
beginner, 6:30; intermediate, 7; 
swimmer, 7:30; basic rescue 
advanced life saving, 5-6:30. 



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P«H* I* Quinc> Sun Thursday, Jul> JO. 1981 




KAREN CASHMAN, 9, of Wollaston won the gold medal in the 
preliminary B-l category at the (ape Cod Interclub figure skating 
competition at the (.alio Arena in Bourne. She represented the 
Commonwealth Figure Skating Club and was the youngest soloist in this 
> ear's show. Karen has passed both her preliminan freestyle and figure 
tests. She is also a member of the Quincy Track Club and the Wollaston 
Junior Bowling league. 

(I'lmtti l>\ Frci/ (ashman) 

Eddie Pellagrini Clinic 
At Adams Field Aug. 5 



The Quincy Recreation Dept., 
together with the Pepsi-Cola 
bottling company of Milton will 
sponsor the Eddie Pellagrini free 
baseball clinic next Wednesday. 
Aug. 5. at 10 a.m. at Adams Field. 

Pellagrini. former Red Sox 
inliclder and a 10-year major 
leaguer with the Red Sox, Pirates, 
Phillies and Reds, is conducting 
his ninth annual free clinics. 

The objective of the program is 
to make major league playing and 
training available to hometown 
youngsters, and all those over six 
years of age are eligible to attend. 

Pellagrini of Weymouth, who is 
being assisted by John (Tinker) 
Connelly of Northeastern 
University. Dick (Moe) Maloney 
of Watertown High and Bobby 
DeFelice. former Red Sox minor 
league catcher, began his two-a- 
day clinics on June 24 and will 



have conducted nearly 50 of them 
when they end next Wednesday. 

The personable Pellagrini, a 
member of the Red Sox pennant 
winners of 1946 and a teammate of 
Ted Williams and Johnny Pesky 
among others, may best be 
remembered as a rookie who hit 
the game-winning homer-his first 
time at bat for the Red Sox. He 
followed that with another homer, 
triple and double in his second 
game. 

He has earned a reputation as 
the game's Goodwill Ambassador. 
As many as 500 eager youngsters 
have shown up at one of his free 
clinics. 

Pellagrini has been head coach 
at Boston College since 1954. 
turning out many championship 
teams, winning a number of post- 
season playoff spots, several 
regional and college world series 
teams. 



Over 150 Compete 
In Merrymount Tourney 



The recent sixth annual 
Merrymount Tennis Tournament, 
sponsored by the Merrymount 
Association, drew more than 50 
players and according to 



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Complete System Service 

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Walk To The No. Quincy T 

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Chairman Art Boyle, "was a huge 
success." • 

Categories included boys singles 
(I6and under). girls singles(l6 and 
under), men's singles, women's 
singles and mixed doubles. 

Mike Molloy defeated P.J. 
Hussey, 6-1 , 5-7. 6-I . for the boys' 
singles title; Jackie Coleman 
defeated Nancy Roberts. 7-5, 7-5. 
for the girls singles crown; Mike 
Connolly beat Art Boyle. 5-7, 6-3, 
6-2, in the men's singles final; Dana 
Loeb topped Dorothy Shea. 6-3.6- 
4, for the women's singles 
championship and Dan Boyle and 
Bernie DiPietro defeated Mike 
Connolly and Nancy Roberts. 5-7, 
6-4, 6-3, for the mixed doubles 
title. 



Stay Alive! 

By John Valante 

BACKYARD 
ELECTRICAL SAFETY 



Usini: electricity outdoors to 
operate uarden tools, lights and 
appliances has become an 
accepted part of outdoor leisure 
living. But accidents do happen. 
They are most frequently caused 
by equipment or wiring that is 
faults or improperly grounded tor 
outdoor use. Here are a few 
suggestions: 

Use only oords, plugs, and 
equipment that have the 
Underwriters' Laboratories (UL) 
label and are recommended for 
"outdoor use". When necessary 
have a qualified electrician install 
permanent weatherproof 

(waterproof), outlets that can 
accommodate three-prong plugs. 
Never use indoor cords or lamps 
outdoors. 

Use adapters in any present 
two-hole outdoor outlets so that 
they will accommodate 



three-pronged plugs. Never cut off 
the third prong of a plug to make 
it fit a two-hole outlet. 

Observe special care when 
there is a swimming pool in the 
yard. In fact, safety experts urge- 
that you use only 
battery-powered radios, 
televisions, etc , in a pool area. 
• * * 
this information has been 
brought to you as a public smlct 
by N ABOKHOOI) PHARM \( \. 
406 Hancock St.. No Quinvv. 

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: 

(barge Accounts 

Delivery Service 

Insurance Receipts 

Free Gift Wrapping 

Ostomy Supplies 

Tax Records on Request 

Utility Payments Mon. Thru Sat 9 

to 5 

Phone: 328-3426 



RECREATION ROUNDUP 



Avalon Beach (Instructor 
Carolyn Nee] Welcome back to 
another fun and exciting summer 
on Avalon Beach. This summer 
we have a lot of new students 
taking lessons. Among them are, 
Lauren and Louise Mahoney, 
Shylo Schuboth, Colleen and 
David Duffy, Ally Sleiman, 
Francis Morgan, Matthew and 
Jay McLarnon and Richard and 
Nicole Sardano. All of the 
swimmers are progressing well. 
First to move on to another class 
this summer was Brian Douglas, 
who passed Advanced Beginner 
and is doing well in Inter- 
mediates. Even the bad weather 
didn't stop Erin, Colleen and Billy 
Shehan from coming to take their 
swimming lessons. Non- 
swimmers already are able to 
float by themselves. 

Bayfield Beach [Instructor 
Ann-Marie Boness] - Bayfield 
Beach welcomes all returning all 
new families, especially the 
Tobins, Tracy, Brian and Paul, 
who have just moved to Quincy 
from Alabama. 

Heidi Spanks-Johnson, Robert 
Ragusa, Lisa Flynn, Noreen 
McDonagh and Mary Ann 
McDonagh are doing well with 
underwater swimming. A few of 
the non-swimmers have already 
moved up into Beginners. They 
include Michael Grant and Cheri 
Condon. Hardest worker in 
Beginners this week is Maria 
Mattson. Stacey Flynn demon- 
strated the best crawl stroke of all 
the beginners. 

Among Advanced Beginners, 
George Garros and David 
Campbell are trying to slow down 
their strokes. Danny Flaherty is 
showing good form on all the 
Advanced Beginner strokes. 

Attendance on Bayfield has 
been above average; especially in 
Non-swimmers and Beginners 
classes. Best attendance goes to 
Non-swimmers Patricia Ham and 
Brian Driscol, Beginners Laura 
and Michael Christopherson, 
Advanced Beginner Kerry 
Christopherson, Intermediate 
Maureen Flaherty, Swimmer 
Brian Tobin, Basic Rescue and 
Water Safety Paul Tobin. 

Elm Beach [Instructors John 
Kavanaugh and Linda Morash] - 
Elm Beach has had a good 
turnout. Non-swimmers have 
been working on their superman 
floats. Jamie Bidolia, Pamela 
Walsh. Erin Sullivan, and Mike 
Duffy indicate they'll be floating 
as good as superman himself. 
Beginners Michael and Timmy 
Kane, Tony Blake, Jenny White, 
Jennifer Sullivan and Tommy 
Sullivan have already started, 
practicing crawl strokes. In the 
Advanced Beginner Class, the 
girls defeated the boys in a relay 
race. Stacie Kane, Jennifer 
Connolly, Maureen Kirby, and 
Kathy Duffy paced the girls. John 
Woodman, Gareth Murphy and 
Mark Kelleher vowed to catch 
them in the rematch. 



The Intermediates have also 
been working hard trying to 
perfect the breast-stroke. Sandi 
McNiff, Penny Fasano, Kathy 
Feeney, Erin Bonnevier, and 
Harry Morash are working hard. 
Brian Callow already has swum 
nearly four miles, while Patty 
Feeney and Jerry Bow en aren't 
far behind. Advanced Lifesavers 
Steve D'Attilio, Lynda Feeney. 
and John Murphy, along with 
Basic Rescuers Donna Greene 
and Kerry Kirby are working hard 
to make Elm Street Beach a safer 
place to swim while they're 
around. 

Heron Road Beach [Instructor 
Patti Morris] - There are 60 
registered swimmers participat- 
ing in the swim program and 25 
tanned, loyal mothers who come 
to the beach daily. 

Non-swimmers include Lauren 
Pringle, Greg and Stephen 
Fernald, Stephanie Wiltshire, 
Kirk Thomas, Suzanne Berlicca, 
Dana Shea, Jason Bouffard and 
John Austin, Peter Haldoupis, 
John Berggren and Jackie 
Pelechowics. 

Nickerson Beach [Instructor 
Beverly Josselyn] - Sara Radell 
can float by herself. Jesse Ahern 
is very good. 

There are 22 youngster's in the 
beginners class. Katie Keating is 
only three years old. Ernie Conti. 
Rebecca Squires, and Kim and 
Krista Olson are here everyday. 

Advanced Beginners Kim 
Saniuk has already skilled a nice 
elementary backstroke and Claire 
Walsh does a survival float well. 
Thanks to Colleen Monahan and 
Jimmy Sumner for all their help 
as Junior Leaders. 

Rock Island [Instructor 
Katherine MacDonald] - Three 
new families moved into the Rock 
Island area, the Hanly's, the 
Gaggett's and the Fullerton's. 
Attendance is high. There are 
nine non-swimmers. Clinton 
Fullerton and Darlean and Bobby 
Daggett have been to class 
everyday. 

There are 15 in beginners class. 
Susan McKay, John Kelley, 
Kerry Wysocki, Kerry-Ann 
Mahoney and Susan Crispo can 
already float by themselves. For 
the third season in a row, Jason 
McKay is in advanced beginner. 
The Brown girls are back this 
season and are doing well as 
usual. Janet and Lisa Morrell are 
competing again. They're both in 
swimmers this year. We're 
starting a Slimnastics Class for all 
of the moms at Rock Island. Looks 
like a great summer ahead of us. 

Boating and Sailing (Supervisor 
Judith LaFleur] - Ryan Boathouse 
is doing well thanks to its staff. 
After the first hectic days of 
repairing sailboats, rowboats, 
canoes and whalers, we have 
launched every boat on schedule. 

Turn out for registration was 
high considering the foggy 
weather of that first week. Many 



adults and children quickly filled 
up the classes for evening and 
day time. Now we've settled into 
our summer routine with a full 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
schedule, but there's still room 
for more during the daytime on 
Tuesday and Thursday. 

Evenings from 4 to 8 p.m. are 
active with enthusiastic adults 
and instructors participating. 

Rowing instructors are turning 
out some initiates to the sailing 
classes. The following have 
passed rowing: Elizabeth 
Roberts, Charles McCarthy, 
Donna Christopherson. Scott 
Linsky, Chris Linsky, Nancy 
Shcely, Erin Grogan, Ann 
O'Sullivan, Michael Toland, 
Tracie Allen, Rose Christiani, 
Alice Mitchell, Paul Kavanaugh, 
Kathleen Sheehey, Kerry McCee, 
Patrick Breen, Paul Levers, Sean 
Kaudalka, Chris Barry and Brian 
Tobin. New sailors to be include 
Sally Sheeley. Lisa Lagzdins and 
Julie Killian, among others 
complete their testing. 

Chris Roberts is back to help 
with his skill and David and Fred 
Cawthorne and Brian Callow are 
back also for another summer at 
Black's Creek. 

Playgrounds and Happy Acres 
Camp are taking advantage of the 
opportunity to experience small 
craft handling. 

Quarterdeck (Kevin Craig and 
Karen Robertson]: The summer 
program at Quarterdeck park is 
led by Kevin Craig and Karen 
Robertson. The junior boys' 
baseball team is off to a good start 
after defeating Baker Beach and 
LaBreque Field. The members of 
the championship-bound team 
are Donny Bemelard, Sean 
Canniff, Frank Freedman, 
George Reefe, Tim Biley, Ronny 
Opoly, Rick Taxera. John Bolger, 
Billy Birkhead and Tommy 
Horogan. Eight of the youngsters 
participated in a raquetball clinic 
at Playoff. 

Enjoying the activities were 
Sean Canniff, Suzanne Canniff, 
George Reefe, Jean Freedman, 
Debbie and Shauno Hansley, 
Peter Dabrulet and Tim Riley. 
Many of the members of the park 
look forward to the archery and 
arts and crafts specialists to visit 
the park. Some who enjoy these 
activities are Kathleen Fidler, 
Susie Fidler, Michelle Fidler, 
Nickie Campbell, Karen 

Campbell, Julie Campbell, 
Chuckie Jones, Kimmie Jones, 
Michael Jones. Andrew Canniff 
<and Ann Marie Boyle. 

Taffrail | Sandra Morrell |: Most 
of the time the kids on the park 
enjoy playing baseball. Many of 
the girls enjoy Arts and Crafts. 
There arc markers, coloring 
books and crayons for them to 
use. They enjoy that a lot. .. 

Checkers are very popular at 
the park and at the end of the year 
it is planned on having a tourna- 
ment with the best boy and the 
best girl winning prizes. 



Cedrone's 2-Hitter Sparks Granite City 



Granite City Electric's Paul 
Cedrone pitched a two-hitter in a 
9-1 victory over Quincy Local as 
Granite City improved its Babe 
Ruth League record to 15-4-1. 



Cedrone also had a triple, Bob 
Campbell, Mike Cocce and Jim 

Madden had doubles and Jack 
Bolster. Danny Kelly and Mike 



Barron also had hits. 

Granite City has been playing 
outstanding ball both offensively 
and defensively as it heads for the 
playoffs. 



Hedge Pruning 
Yard Renovation 
Poolside Landscaping 




Wood Fences & Repairs 
Decks & Retaining Walls 
Shrub Planting & Pruning 



471-8824 



Call Now For Free Estimate 

WHITTEMORE BROS. 

Graduate of Stockbridge School of Agriculture 



472-6904 



Thursday. July 30, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 19 



By Warren Sattlcr 




• 

Special Features 



STARSCOPE* V 



by Clare Annswell 



— * — 



■7-S-tl 



RURAL DELIVERY 



By AL SMITH 



ROE, THE FISH WARDEN IS \ 
ON THE DOCK.' VOU'RE ALLOWED 
SIX FISH BUT NOTHING OVER 
TWELVE INCHES/ YOU BETTER 
THROW IT BACK/ 



S 7 ^ 



vV*\\w 





ftL^Ml¥H— • 



Grandpa's Boy 




By Brad Anderson 



NAPOLEON 



By McBride and Moore 



WE'P BETTER MAN TH'OARS AND HEAD 
POR SHORE, NAPOLEON/ TH' WIND'S 
COMING UP AND I HAVEN'T CAUGHT A 
BLESSED THINS/ v 





TWITCH 



SPECIAL ON 
SEAFOOD 



w 



AL IMITH FCATUftC SCK 



By How Rands 





WEEK OF: JULY 30. 1981 

AQUARIUS - January 21 February 19 

Dates may be rescheduled, resulting in a little chaos, a lot of 
headaches A superb week for expressing opinions, write a letter to 
your love ... or maybe to the editor. 

PISCES - February 20 March 20 

Be alert to new job options all week long More time than expected is 
needed for educational pursuits — avoid short cuts Romance is 
sweeter than ever — for singles and marrieds 

ARIES - March 21 April 20 

Pay debts promptly and meet as many social obligations as you can 
Investigative work is your specialty now Younger family members 
can bring out your best qualities 

TAURUS - April 21 May 22 

Home improvements accented now, especially if you're on your own 
Friendship prospects are brightening More discipline is needed in 
areas of fitness and diet. 

GEMINI - May 23 June 21 

Ideas are backfiring and colleagues are stubborn. Family members, 
meanwhile, are cooperative and supportive — and that's more impor- 
tant than anything else at this time 

CANCER - June 22 July 22 

Career opportunity is opening up, but don't Invade another's territory 
Lively social week; you can have loads of fun, most of It on a super- 
ficial level. 

LEO - July 23 August 22 

Cultural and creative activities can provide a path to profitable ven- 
tures. Communication breakdown is patched by weekend You feel 
comfortable expressing deepest feelings. 

VIRGO - August 23 September 22 

Communication breakthrough happens before the weekend, and 
patch -up with loved one is likely by Tuesday. Travel companion may 
be hard to please now — avoid showdown if possible 

LIBRA - September 23-October 22 

Upbeat mood is best expressed through decor or wardrobe. Romance 
continues to bloom — even if loved one isn't accessible May have dif- 
ficulty extracting funds. 

SCORPIO - October 23-November 21 

If loved one is reserved, it's wisest not to ask questions Travel is 
favored Business ventures require fewer — and wiser — opinions 
Volunteer work accented through weekend 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22 December 22 

Don't be subtle in making requests; you can't expect friends and col- 
leagues to read your mind — especially this week. After a false start, a 
happy new friendship is ready for takeoff. 

CAPRICORN - December 23 January 20 

Shopping and travel are favored; attending a country fare would be a 
nice blend of the two. Arguments get out of hand quickly, so put them 
to bed a sap 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

Challenges are irresistible, but sometimes you take them on for the 
sheer enjoyment Communication is accented in an important way, 
and it may prove worthwhile — and ultimately profitable — to hone 
skills in this area. 

BORN THIS WEEK 

July 30th, singer Paul Anka; 31st, actor Don Murray; August 1st, ac- 
tor Geoffrey Holder; 2nd, actor Carroll O'Connor; 3rd, actress 
Dolores Del Rio, 4th, poet Percy B. Shelley; 5th, actress Loni Ander- 
son. 



IT JUST SO HAPPENED 



Cirossweird 



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HORNETS MD 
OTtJERWIt/GEP 
/MSECTS CAUSE MORE 

fatalities in we 

US. THMfiNY 
OTHER WILD 
CREATURES 
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HATTLESNAKES ? 





Unmix the letters in the boxes to form a 

word. Then circle A, B or C for the cor 

red meaning (or definition). 

Score yourself as follows : 
4 Correct-Excellent 2 Correct-Fair 
3 Correct-Good 1-0 Correct-Poor 



C SPONGE 



By D. J. Coates 




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CLUB i Thirst qufnchpr 



IV/905, A MEMBER 'OF 7»£ MASS. £E6/SiA7(/RS lAfTFO. 
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5. 


Dill 


9. 


Let 


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Diving bird 


12 


River (Sp.) 


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16 


ice (Latin) 


17 


rave 


19. 


D. ,i ph 


20 


Oiopotched 


21 


ipce out 


22 


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24 


vVork unit 


26 


Saucy 


27 


Kind of gas 


29 


College yell 


30 


Attack 


32 


Through 


34 


Catch sight of 


35 


French 



36 
38 

39 

41. 
42 
44 
46 

47 



Close noisily 
Wooden 
snow runner 
Air: 

comb, form 
Girls' name 
Abounds 
German city 
Punching 
tools 
Sloves 
DOWN 

Nude 

Select group 

Percussion 

instrument 

In like 

manner 

Metric 

measure 

However 

Dark wood 

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10 
11. 

14 
15 
18 



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CLUEi I don't thinK so! 



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passage 

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Depart 

Small hat 

Pile 

Opposed 

to religion 

'. eother strips 

height of 

India 

Tibetan 

gazelle 

Egypt km 

river 

Awry 

Sea God 

Block bird 

This (Sp ) 

Horse's 

neck hair* 

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Windstorm 

Manuscript 

(o bbr.) 

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point 



Page 20 Quinc) Sun Thursday, July 30, 1981 



Arts/Entertainment 



- 1 



Former Captain To Speak 
On Old Ironsides 



Cmdr. Tyrone G. Martin, 
captain of the USS Constitution 
from 1974-1978, will lecture on 
Old I ronsides Tuesday, Aug. 4, at I 
p.m. at the Quincy Historical 
Society in the Adams Academy 
building. 

Martin, a career naval officer for 
26 years, is the author of the book 
"A Most Fortunate Ship," which 
details the history of the U.S. 
V*m v '< ol^'^' '-nmmissioncd 



vessel. 

During his tenure as captain, the 
ship underwent a $4.4 million 
restoration, welcomed on board 
Queen Elizabeth of Britain and 
took part in the 1976 parade of the 
Tall Ships. 

Martin's lecture, part of the 
Quincy Remembers series, is free 
and open to the public. 
Refreshments will be served. 



Playground Parent's Nights 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department will conduct 
Playground Parents' Night 6 to 8 
p.m. according to the following 
dates and locations: 

Monday, Aug 3 - Atlantic. 
Bishop. Mvlcs Standish. 
Squantum, Welcome Young. Him 
Street. Fore River, Pollard. Pond 
Street. Russell Park. 

Tuesday. Aug. 4 - Adams. 
(i r a s s o . K i n C a i d e , Shea, 
O'Rourke. Faxon Park. 

u 'ed nesda v. Aug. 5 - 



Beechwood Knoll. Wollaston. 
Fenno, Mass. Fields. 

Wednesday. Aug. 5 - Forbes 
Hill, Baker. FaBreque, Chaple, 
Quarterdeck. Taffrail. Perkins. 
Heron Road. 

Each playground will provide a 
special program to acquaint 
parents of participants with the 
youngsters activities during the 
normal playground day. 

Residents are urged to visit then 
neighborhood playground to 
watch or join in the activities. 



piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiig 

= A Tradition in North Quincy for 50 Years 

SUataarant I 

9 Billings Road 
North Quincy 

328-5455 

Open 7 Days a Week 

Featuring 

LUNCHEON SPECIALS I 
$2.25 to $4.25 I 

DAILY | 

DINNER SPECIALS | 

THURS. EVENING 

OUR FAMOUS 
N.E. BOILED DINNER j 

FRI. EVENING 

FISHERMAN'S PLATTER | 

Dinner Served 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. 
Sun. Wed. 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

Gentlemen* Bar Salad Bar 

member l dinner meals onl V 

[QUI] 2£ -T- 
fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 




cirMili tutu 





Dinner Speciols from $ 3.50 

Doily 3:00-9:00 

Chinese Polynesian Food 

* New Additional Luncheon 
Specials 11:30 to 3 P.M. 

* Dinner Specials 3 P.M. to 9 P.M. 

* Banquet Facilities 

* Cocktail Lounge 




TAKE OUT ORDERS 



gr CALL AHEAD FOR 

FAST SERVICE ^ 

Bonquet Facilities Available 



105 Sea St., Quincy 

TAKE OUT ORDERS 
471-2255 




GIDDY-l I'-Susan Sweeney, 4, with her mother F.llen close by, enjoyed her first pony ridi- Jul* 4. at Faxon 
Park as part of field dan activities held by the Adams Heights Men's Club. 

(Quinvy Sun I'holo l>\ Dine (Ullimly) 

Free Trips To Harbor Islands Park 



Free boat transportation to the 
Boston Harbor Islands State Park 
is available weekdays to non- 
profit community groups through 
the State Department of Environ- 
mental Management. 

Rep. Robert A. Cerasoli notes 
that groups wishing to make such 
excursions can obtain an applica- 
tion by calling or writing the 
Wompatuck State park, 201 
Union St., Hingham, 02043, at 
749-7160. 

Qualified groups will receive a 



special group transportation 
permit covering a maximum of 99 
passengers on a one time basis. 
Groups of 20 or more must obtain 
an additional permit from the 
MDC at 727-5250. 



Each group must then contact 
cither Bay State-Spray and 
Provincctown Steamship Co.. 
Massachusetts Bay Lines, or 
Boston Harbor Cruises to arrange 
a convenient date for the trip. 



Fun-For-All Kits 
Available From MDA 




Featuring 

the Finest In 

\ew England 

Cooking 



LUNCHEON 

II A.M. to4 P.M. 

DINNER 

4 P.M. to 10 P.M. 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

Bowling Banquets 

Retirement Parties Showers 

Weddings & Anniversaries 



Entertainment 

Nightly at the 

Fireside Lounge 

FOR RESERVATIONS 
Call 471 1623. 471 5540 



Fun-For-AII Event kits arc now 
available free from the Muscular 
Dystrophy Association. 

T l, 2 kits are filled with ideas for 
people of all ages to use over the 
summer. 

They include game suggestions 
and tips for organizing backyard 
carnivals anrl events «mc'< r>« V>!V<- 



races, swim parties, talent shows, 
neighborhood Olympics, and 
more. 

To obtain free Fun-For-All kit, 
call 843-2797, or write: Carnival 
Kit, Muscular Dystrophy Associa- 
tion. 420 Washington St., Suite 
B-6. Braintrec, MA 02184. 



1514 HANCOCK ST. QUINCY SAVE ON nEuUllUO 

TAPES-LUGGAGE 

SHEET MUSIC 

LEATHER GOODS & MORE 



* * 




LAS VEGAS NIGHT 

The Las Vegas Nights are Back 

Friday, Aug. 7 
7 P.M. to Midnight 

Sponsored by 

Quincy Lodge 1295 
Sons of Italy in America 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 

REFRESHMENTS DONATION $1.00 



+ * 



* * 



Thursday, July 30. I9SI Quincy Sun Page 21 



I 



Historical Society 

Members To Cruise 

Boston Harbor 



Friday, Aug. 7, is the deadline 
for reservations for the Quincy 
Historical Society's cruise aboard 
the S.S. Calliope Thursday. Aug. 
20, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 

Musicians from the Quincy 
Symphony Orchestra will 
entertain as the canopied 
steamboat cruises Boston Harbor 
and the Charles River. 

The boat will also navigate the 
locks at Charlesgate and pass by 
the Hatch Shell as well as other 
familiar landmarks. 

The S.S. Calliope, designed by 
Halsey Herreshof, is powed by a 
1905 marine steam engine visible 



to passengers. Her 19th century 
lines and mahogany deckhouse are 
complimented by authentic brass 
hardware. 

Price of tickets includes the 
cruise, dessert and entertainment. 
Reservations, which are limited, 
are on a first come, first served 
basis. 

The S.S. Calliope will depart 
from Museum Wharf, 300 
Congress St., Boston. 

Bus transportation will be 
available from the Adams 
Academy Building at an additional 
cost. The bus will depart for 
Museum Wharf at 5:45 p.m. 



Wiltshire Paintings 
At Manet Health Center 



The Houghs Neck Community 
Center, 1193 Sea St., announces 
that the paintings of D. Parkin 
Wiltshire will be on display 
during August and September at 
the Manet Community Health 



Center. 

Wiltshire is a resident of Rock 
Island Rd. 

The paintings display is part of 
the Artist in Residence Series. 



QHS Band Color Guard 
Has Openings For New Members 



Any girl interested in joining 
the Quincy High School Band 
Color Guard for the coming school 
year should report Tuesday, Aug. 
4, at 7 p.m. to the Vo-Tech 
parking lot, Woodward Ave. 

For more information, call 

Patty Raber 
Wins 31 Sundaes 

Patty Raber of 41 Taffrail Rd., 
Germantown was selected as the 
winner in the recent "Month of 
Sundaes" promotion held by 
Baskin Robbins, Quincy Center. 

First prize entitles her to 31 
free sundaes. 



773-1439. 



Save Gas and Money... 
...Shop Locally 






ACHIEVE 

UN 

ITNESS 
ELLOWSHIP 
ULFILLMENT . . . 

DANCE HAPPY WITH 

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e>mil<zs! 

Aerobic Smiles. A unique, exciting exercise program consisting 
of simple dances set to a variety of music, which makes the 
heart, lungs and circulatory system stronger and more efficient, 
while promoting coordination, flexibility, and endurance. 
A thorough, considerate, and personal activity is offered letting 
you work at your own pace, to tone muscles, reduce inches 
while improving confidence and positive self awareness. 

CALL TODAY 
328-3696 

Classes Start Aug. 10th 

No Quincy and Wollaston 



[" Free T Shirt j 

When Registering 
With This Ad_ 

• 8 weeks (16 classes) $40. 

• Attend 1st Class At No Charge 




WIRTANEN LIBRARY is the name being given to the Quincy Historical Society's specialized collection of 
books and maps following establishment of a fund for its maintenance by Leonard C. Wirtanen. From the 
left are Mary J. Clark, library chairman; Atty. John M. Corcoran; Wirtanen; Dr. James R. Cameron, 
president of the society. (()Ht , rf( pholl>) 



South Shore Television 

SALES AND SERVICE 



ItC/l 

Authorized 
Servicenter 



In or out of warranty 

Regardless 

where purchased 



Save with Carry in Service 

Service ^n All Leading 
Brands for Over 30 Years 

4791350 

Remo DeNicola Lie. No. 12 
12 Revere Road, Quincy 

(Off 1586 Hancock Street) 



WOLLASTON 
THEATRE 



14 Baale St 



7734600 



Wed &Thurs July 29 & 30 

HUMOR & COMEDY IN 

MEL BROOK'S 

History of The World' (R) 

Eve's 7:00 Only 

Starts Fri. July 31 

BURT REYNOLDS IN 

AN AUTO RACE 

"CANNONBALL RUN" (PG) 

Fri & Sat 7:00 & 9:15 

Sun-Thurs 7:00 Only 

Mon & Tues Dollar Night 



SEATS $1.50 MAT'S $1.25 




What's New at Wendy's? 
The Special Bacon Burger 

A special bacon burger with 
cheese, tomato & lettuce and 
special sauce served on a 
warm bulky roll $1.85 



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Buy one salad from our 

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT 
SALAD BAR $1.89 



Your friend will get an 
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Salad 



Two can eat for the price of one 
with this coupon 




1 
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I 
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I 
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I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
J 



Wrntfs 



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HAMBURGERS 




540 Southern Artery and 191 Newport Avenue 



Page 22 Quinc) Sun Ihursdm. Jul) Ml. 1981 



Koch Broad Meadows District 
Awards Night Aug. 4 



James 
Suffolk U 



Ridlen 
. Graduate 



LEGAL NOTICES 



The Broad Meadows District of 
the Koch Club Bo> 's Baseball and 
Girl's Softball Leagues will hold 
their 20th Annual Parents and 
Awards Night Tuesday. Aug. 4. 
at 6:30 p.m. at Broad Meadows 
Junior High School Field. 50 
Calvin Road. Quincy. 
t Presentations will be awarded 
based on attendance and depend- 
ability. Following completion of 
the program, ice cream will be 
distributed. 

In addition to its recreational 
activity, the Broad Meadows 
District since 1%4 has annually 
awarded $100. each to a boy and 
girl graduate of Quincy High 



School. A total of 36 boys and 
girls have received $3,600 in 
Scholarship Awards from the 
Broad Meadows District in the 
past 18 years. 

Anthony T. Delmonico. District 
Director of the Koch Club unit, 
will be master of ceremonies at 
Tuesday's program. He will be 
assisted by Mrs. Gerry 
Delmonico. 

The Koch Club has four 
locations where boys baseball and 
girls softball recreational 
activities are conducted. They are 
North Quincy, Broad Meadows, 
Montclair and West Quincv. 



Wayne Gardiner Completes Tour 



Wayne Gardiner, son of Mr. 
anil Mrs. Robert Gardiner. 38 
Riverside Ave.. Adams Shore. 
has completed a six-week tour of 
I hi 1 « im stmlving geophysics 
.i situ!, in unit f'oni Bati-s 
College. 

Gardiner is a senior at the 
1'ivral arts college in Lewiston, 
Maine. 

The study group's itinerary 
includes New Mexico. Arizona, 
Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. 

Activities include mapping in 
San Ysidro, N.M.; field trips to 
the Painted Desert and Arches 
National Park, a stop at Grand 

LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81.M0454-D1 

Dl BORAH A. POTTER, Plaintiff 
vs. DAN1I L I . POTTER, Defendant. 
Summons by Publieation. 

To the above-named Defendant: 

A complaint has been presented to 
this Court by your spouse, Deborah 
A. Potter, seeking a divorce lor cruel 
and abusive treatment. 

You are required to serve upon 
Richard M. Lane, plaintiffs attorney, 
whose address is 11 Beacon Street, 
Boston., MA 02108 your answer on 
or before Fourteenth day of October, 
1981. If you fail to do so, the Court 
will proceed to the hearing and 
adjudication of this action. You are 
also required to file a copy of your 
answer in the office of the Register 
of this Court at Dedham. 

Witness. ROBI RT M. I ORD, 
Esq., First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham. July 17, 1981. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/30 8/6-13/81 

COMMONWEALTH 01 

MASSACHUSFTTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 8111 90011 

Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CECELIA M. MERRILI IS 
Also Known As MARGARET C. 
MERILEES, CECELIA M. 

MI RRILISS and MARGARET C. 
MERRILI SS late of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that CATHERINE S. NLUMEYFR of 
Orange Park, Florida be appointed 
Executrix named in the will without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/26/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Fsquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Ninth day ol July in the 
Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES. 
Register of Probate. 
7/23-30 8/6/81 



Canyon, and a raft trip down the 
San .luan River. 

The students will analyze their 
findings at the University i*f 

Wyoming's p.ileom.i. iK-tie 

hi bora ton. 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 811 1962A1 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ANGI LO J. I ERRAZZI 
late of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. NOTICE 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter praying 
that CHARLES J. I ERRAZZI of 
Stoughton in the County of Norfolk 
be appointed Administrator without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 9/2/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Fsquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the twentieth day of July in 
the Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/30 8/6-13/81 

COMMONWEALTH Ol 
MASSACHUSFTTS 

Norfolk, ss. Trial Court of 

Massachusetts 

Flast Norfolk Division 

Civil Docket No. 40812 

At the District Court of East 
Norfolk, liolden at Quincy, within 
the County of Norfolk for civil 
business, on the eighth day of July, 
A.D., 1981 

FREDERICK W. GILMORI , 
Plaintitt vs. JESSE ROS1 , 
Defendant. 

This is an action of a Petition to 
Enforce Lien and For Storage and 
Cost of Motor Vehicle against the 
defendant Jesse Rose, as set forth in 
the Plaintiff's Complaint dated Julv 
6, 1981. 

And it appearing to the Court by 
the suggestion of the Plaintiff and on 
inspection of the officer's return on 
the plaintiff's summons, that no 
personal service of said complaint has 
been made upon the defendant Jesse 
Rose. 

IT IS ORDERED BY THE 
COURT, here, that the Plaintiff give 
notice to the defendant JESSE 
ROSF, of the pendency of this 
action, and to appear before the 
Court, on the thirty-first day of 
August, 1981, to answer to the same, 
by causing an attested copy of this 
order to be published in the Quincy 
Sun, a newspaper published in 
Quincy, Massachusetts, once a week, 
three weeks successively: and that 
this action be continued to the 
thirty-first day of August, 1981, or 
until notice shall be given to the 
Defendant Jesse Rose agreeably to 
this order. 

JAMI SJ. FOLEY, JR. CLERK 
A True Copy Attest. 

John Dalton 
Assistant Clerk-Magistrate 
7/16-23-30/81 



.lames M. Ridlen of 91 Rock 
Island Rd.. Houghs Neck, was 
recently graduated from Suffolk 
University with a B.S. degree. 

He plans to attend Suffolk 
University's Graduate School to 
pursue a master's degree in public 
administration. 

Ridlen was graduated from 
Quincy Junior College in 1978 
with an associate's degree in 
criminal justice. 

He is the son of .1. Robert 
Ridlen, who is employed by 
Boston Gas Company, Braintree. 
and Patricia Shea Ridlen. 
coordinator of community affairs 
at the Houghs Neck Community 
Center. 

LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWI ALTH Ol 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 801063611 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOSI PH W. SMITH, late of 
Quincy, in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased prayinu 
that JOHN N. KALL1S of Canton in 
the County of Norfolk be appointed 
Executor named in the will without 
sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/26/81. 

Witness. ROBERT M. FORI), 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Seventh day of July in 
the Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/16-23-30/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

DIPT. OF ENVIRONMENTAL 

QUALITY ENGINEERING 

DIVISION OE WATER 
POLLUTION CONTROL 

ONI WINTER STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 02108 

FINAL DITFRMINATION TO 

ISSUF A PROPOSED 
SEWER EXTENSION PERMIT 

On May 14, 1981, the 
Massachusetts Division of Water 
Pollution Control published a notice 
in the Quincy Sun of its final 
determination to deny a permit for a 
sewer connection to serve a proposed 
commercial and residential 

development on School Street in 
Quincy, based on an application 
submitted by the Quincy Department 
of Public Works on behalf of OBC, 
Inc. of One Heritage Drive, Quincy. 
The application was filed and the 
notice of tentative determination 
published pursuant to Section 43 of 
Chapter 21 of the General Laws. This 
denial was based on the inadequacy 
of the Town Brook Interceptor to 
transport the additional wastes to be 
generated by the project. 

The division has now received 
information that the proposed 
project is not in the Town Brook 
Interceptor drainage area and the 
sewage to be generated by the project 
will not, therefore, exacerbate the 
problems in the Town Brook 
Interceptor drainage area. 

On the basis of this information, 
the Division hereby issues a final 
determination to approve the 
above-described application pursuant 
to Section 43 of Chapter 21 of the 
General Laws. 

Within 14 days of this final 
determination, parties (as defined in 
sections, 1, 10 and 10A of Chapter 
30A of the (Jeneral Laws) aggrieved 
by the determination may file a 
written request with the Director for 
an Adjudicatory Hearing under the 
provisions of Chapter 30A (the 
Massachusetts Administrative 

Procedure Act) and the Standard 
Adjudicatory Rules of Practice and 
Procedure (801 (MR 1.00). 

Thomas C. McMahon, 
Director 
7/30/81 



NEWSCARRIERS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH Ol 
MASSACHUSFTTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 8III896I I 
Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CFSARIO PI NA late of 
Quincy, in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General ot saiil 
Commonwealth, it required. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter o\' a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will ot said deceased praying 
that MARIA GUMMING of Braintree 
in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executrix named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

1 lyou desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/26/81. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD. 
Fsquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Ninth day of July in the 
Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and F ighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/23-30 8/6/81 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSFTTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81 M 1084-1)1 

CATHERINE BRUNDIGI 

Plaintiff vs. RICHARD ROSS 
BRUNDIGI Defendant. Summons 
by Publication. 

To the above-named Defendant: 

A complaint has been presented to 
this Court by your spouse, Catherine 
Brundige, seeking a divorce for cruel 
and abusive treatment. 

You are required to serve upon 
Nancy Loren/., plaintiff's attorney, 
whose address is Greater Boston 
Legal Services 85 Devonshire St., 
Boston, your answer on or before the 
14th day of October, 1981. If you 
fail to do so, the Court will proceed 
to the hearing and adjudication of 
this action. You are also required to 
file a copy of your answer in the 
office of the Register of this Court at 
Dedham, Norfolk Probate Court. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORI), 
Esq., First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, July 15, 1981 . 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/23-30 8/6/81 



COMMONWI ALTH OF 
MASSACHUSFTTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 81 1 15841 I 

Notice of Appointment 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of RUTH H. N1CKERSON late 
of Quincy, in the County of Norfolk. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth. 

A petition has been presented in 
the above captioned matter of a 
certain instrument purporting to be 
the last will of said deceased praying 
that SARAH THORN COUCH of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk be 
appointed Executrix named in the 
will without sureties on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you or 
your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
on or before ten. o'clock in the 
forenoon on 8/19/81. 

Witness, ROBI RT M. FORD, 
Fsquire, First Judge of said Court at 
Dedham, the Seventh day of July in 
the Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and I ighty-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register of Probate. 
7/23-30 8/6/81 

COMMONWI ALTH OF 
MASSACHUSFTTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate and 

Family Court 

No. 801 1909- El 
Notice of Fiduciary's Account 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES H. SMITH late of 
Quincy, in said County, deceased. 

You arc hereby notified pursuant 
to Mass. R. Civ. P. Rule 72 that the 
first and final account of THOMAS 
C. SMITH as Executor of the will of 
said deceased has been presented to 
said Court for allowance. 

If you desire to preserve your 
right to tile an objection to said 
account, you or your attorney must 
file a written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before the 
second day ofSeptember. 1981, the 
return day of this citation. You may 
upon written reque*' bv registered or 
certified mail to tl . 'ulut an c o 
the attorney lor th» 'tilth i:r\ o' ' i'n 
without cost a cop ,. <>uii! ,.r< lit. 
If you desire to obn , an. ,n of 
said account, you mtK in i i I. , >n 
to filing a written j|iiuun . is 
aforesaid, file within thirty days after 
said return day or within such other 
time as the Court upon motion may 
order a written statement of each 
such item together with the grounds 
tor each objection thereto, a copy to 
be served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 
Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Fsquire. First Judge of said Court, 
this twentieth day of July 1981. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES, 
Register. 
7/30 8/6-13/81 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY Ol QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DIPARTMI NT 

QUINCY CITY HALL 

1305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and deliverinj 
Quincy: 

Hospital Dept. Automatic Processor for 

Nuclear Medicine 
Water Dept. Pipe Supplies & Tools 

School Dept. RE-BID - Bread & Rolls 

Dental Supplies 
Custodial Supplies 
Q.J .C. Catalog 
Service & Maintenance - 

V.H.F./U.H.I . Radio 

Communications 
Sheet Metal/Bar Stock 
Lumber 
Service & Maintnance - 

Lawn & Snow Equipment 
Graphic Arts Paper 

Supplies 
Industrial Gases 



to the City of 



Aug. 17, 1981 at 10:00 A.M. 

Auu. 17. 1981 at 10:30 A.M. 
Aug. 24, 1981 at 9:30 A.M. 
Aug. 24, 1981 at 10:00 A.M. 
Aug. 24, 1981 at 10:30 A.M. 
Aug. 24, 1981 at 11:00 A.M. 
Aug. 25, 1981 at 10:00 A.M. 



Aug. 25, 1981 at 10:30 A.M. 
Aug. 25, 1981 at 11:00 A.M. 
Aug. 26, 1981 at 10:00 A.M. 

Aug. 26, 1981 at 10:30 A.M. 



Aug. 26, 1981 at 11:00 A.M. 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing Agent, 
Quincy City Hall. 1305 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration and will be received at the 
office of the Purchasing Agent until the tjluc and date stated above, at which 
time and date they will be publicly opened and read. 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the sealed envelope is to 
be clearly marked. "BID ENCLOSI D" with time/date of bid call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept any part of a bid 
or the one deemed best tor the City. 

Arthur H. Tobin, Mayor 
William J. Kelly, Purchasim; Agent 
7/30/81 



Thursda), July 30, 1981 Quincy Sun Page 23 



§£££; CLASSIFIED ADS! 



HELP WANTED 



FOR RENT 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



Part Time 

Earn $5-10 hourly servicing our 
customers from home on your 
telephone. 924-7450. 

7/30 



FOR SALE 



AMF Force 5 
Sailboat 

In excellent condition with 
Hosclaw Trailer. Ready to sail at 
$1,195.00. Call 773-3724. 

N 20 

Waterbeds 

New Queen or King Si/e Waterbcd. 
never opened. 10 year waranty, 
walnut stained pine frame, 
headboard, deck, pedestal, 
mattress, liner, heater. Originally 
$330.00. now $199.00. 828-1662, 
Canton. 

X 20 



Dutchmaid 

Quality clothing for the entire 
family. I09j off all underwear 
orders. For the month of July only. 
Party plan or individual orders. 
Call Clemie Brill 479-6538. 

7 30 

Air Conditioners 
For Sale 

5.100 BTU Norge 119.00. 12.000 
BTU Fedders 125.00. 8,000 B'lU 
Westinghouse 119.00. 

90 Day Warranties 
471-5153 after 4 p.m. 

7 JO 

WANTED 



American Host 
Families Wanted 

American families wanted, to room 

and board select international 

students. Screening and 

supervision guaranteed. Min. 

Length of stay 4 mos. Please reply: 

TOM CUNNIFF 

S.P.S. Language Center 

883 Boylston St. 

Boston, MA 021 16 (262-0383) 

7 30 

WANTED 

Will borrow, buy or rent si?e 12-13 
Beige Wedding Gown for 
November. Please call 328-8150 if 
you can help. 
7 .10 

Refrigerators Wanted 

Will pay you $10.00 cash for your 
refrigerators. 1960'sand up. 
471-5153 after 4 p.m. 

7,30 

Position Wanted 

Looking for job taking care of 
elderly people weekends or nights. 
Phone 282-8139. 

7 30 



PERSONALS 



IOM II 1)1 . O llol> Si Judc. Aponllc and 
M.iny. greul in virtue and rich in miracle. 
near kinsman "l J**u« (Ihm. lauliiul 
inicrccs'.or nl all who invoke \oui special 
naironavi' in lime irf need, in y«u I ha\e 
recourse hum ihe depth- »f im heart and 
humhK het in whom (u'd hasyiten naeh trial 
power, lo conic In m\ avwJMBIHW help me in nn 
piCM-ni anduryenl pennon In nun n. I promise 
In make your name known and cause >ou In he 
nnokcil. sa> J Our I alhciv J Mail Marys and 
(ilnriav Puhliealinn bihhI he promised Si 
.hide Bra} lor u> and all who unoke uiui aid 
\iucii I Ins \o\ena has ne\ei hecn known n> 
I. nl I have had rm rvquesl granted, illns 
\o\ena should he- said on 9 consecutive da\s| 
I'uhlicalion promised . .. 

X 6 

"A MESSAGE 
For Jehovah's Witnesses" 

Are you a Jehovah's Witness with 
questions'.' We may have the 
answers for you. Call 843-1836. 
New message weekly. 

7 30 



Thank You St. Jude 



For Favors Granted. 



B.M 

7 30 



Cottages For 
Rent 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore. Housekeeping 
cottages. Studio and 3- 
room available. Weekly 
rentals $165 to $200. 
Private beach. Tennis 
available. Call 328-1300, 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

i i 

INSTRUCTION 

Reading Tutoring 

Reading tutoring and SAT prep, 
verbal only. Jr. -Senior high schoo. 
Jr. college level. Certified specialist, 
references available. Call Peggy 
Buck, 471-4279. 

8 6 

Guitar Lessons 

H\ piolessional guitarist ,md 

tc.ului. Ml styles, .ill ajjtfv ? 7 3- 

' Mi 

Music Lessons 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 

BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER 

27 Beale St., Wollaston 

Call 773-5325 

SERVICES OFFERED 

Gordon 

Air Conditioning & 

Refrigeration 

Specializing in residential repair. 
471-5153. 

7 30 

John J. Donovan 

Plumbing, Heating & 

Gas Fitting 

Specializing 
in Bathroom Remolding, gas & oil 
heating systems. Boiler & Hot 
water healer. Rep iaeements. 
Emergency Repairs. Master Lie. # 
8617. 328-5675. 7 .to 



JAY'S 

TREE REMOVAL 

DONE BY TRAINED 
EXPERIENCED PERSONNEL 
Free Estimates 
LOW Fully Insured 

low' 

RATES 

CALL AFTER 4 P. 

843-6115 




Wollaston Fuel & Burner Service 



WE INSTALL 

Oil Burners 

Oil Fired Boilers 

Gas Fired Boilers 

Enertrol-Computor 

Energy Savings - Vent Damper 

Authorized 
Enertol , Pr « ,d « n " 9/M 

Dealer Jerry LaF,amrne 

HAVING YOUR OIL BURNER CLEANED NOW WILL SAVE 
YOU MONEY THIS WINTER - ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



WE SERVICE 

Oil Burners 
Oil Heating Systems 
Gas Heating Systems 
All Motor & Controls 
All Hot Water Problems 

773-3443 

42 ST. ANN'S ROAD 



BOB'S ODD JOBS 

Rubbish Removal 

Hauling 1 Moving 

Landscaping 

Interior Exterior Painting 

General Home Maintenance 

& Repairs 

Many other services 

Free Estimates Very Reasonable 

472-0868 Nights & Weekends 



Professional 

Shrub & Hedge 

Pruning 

Free estimates, 
satisfaction guaran- 
teed. 
DAN 773-2198. 



Atlantic 

CARPET * UPHOLSTERY CLEANING SPECIALISTS 




CARPETS and UPHOLSTERY 
CLEANED 

IN YOUR HOME/OFFICE 



• VELVETS TAPfSTRICS 

• HAITIANS. HERCULONS 

• ALL OTHER FABRICS 



• ORIENTALS 

• WALL lo WALL (," ARPETS 

• PICK UP A DELIVERY 



WATER DAMAGE 

F REE ESTIMA TES 

471-3142 



walter j. Mclean 



X 6 



Larry' 



Home Repair 

Interior - exterior painting, scroll 
ceilings, gutters, roof repairs, and 
property maintenance. 328-8735, 
659-747 1. 

Sparky's Appliance 
Service 

Expert repairs on washers, dryers, 
dishwashers, ranges, and disposers. 
Call 47I-6725. 

8 20 



Housepainting 

Two experienced college students 

looking for summer work punning 

houses, interior and exterior. 

Qualin work at very reasonable 

rates. 

For free estimate, please call Mall. 

773-6833. eves. 7 30 

Keys Made 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

86 Washington St., Quincy 

479-5454 

T.F 



LANDSCAPING 

Hedge trimming, lawn mowing, 

and small jobs. Call Joe 773-888 1. 

7 30 

Loan Wanted 

We offer good interest. Textile 
Company. Call Joan at 823-9879. 

7/30 



Insulate Yourself 

We have a trailer of Cellulose Class 
I available. Rent blower or pour in 
place. THE DR Insulation Co., 600 
Southern Artery, Quincy, next to 
Duane's. 471-5777 

9/30 



MOORE'S PAINTING 

INTERIOR- EXTERIOR 
FREE ESTIMATES 
High Quality - Low Cost 
College Student years of experience 
Call Rory - 925-2419 after 5 p.m. 



Your South Shore 

Headquarters 

For 

Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE & APPLIANCE 

1 15 Franklin 'St . So Quincy 
472-1710 j f 




TREES and STUMPS 
REMOVED 

Eree estimates references. Call Tim 
O'Brien 269-2025. 

8 13 



HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a basic 
Homeowner's polic\ for $30,000 
and are pa> ing more than SI4K (Ml a 
year. Call 479-4242 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency. T.F. 



Hall For Hire 

Weddings, showers, meetings, 
banquets. Elks Home. 1220 
Hancock St., Quincy. 

472-2223 t.f. 



Reliable Floor Service 

Hardwood floor sanding. 
Specialists since 1962. Poly- 
Urethane. Free Est. 335-5509. K 13 



A&T VACUUM 

Repair Specialists On All Makes 

• FREE Pickup, 
Delivery, Estimates 

• Belts, Bags, Hoses all vacs 

• New, used. Rebuilt vacs 

• $9.95 special 
(General overhaul) 
only on carry in 
service with Ad 

• Electrolux Bags N-. 

(l4Pkg$4.29- 5 Pkg$l.59) 
25 Beale St. Wollaston - 479-5066 
357A Wash. St. Braintree- 848-S476 

T.F. 




Hall For Rent 

North Quincy K. of C. Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. For information please 

ca " 328-0087 



T.F. 



"Tunerville Trolley" 

(ONE-MAS BAND) 

Yesteryear's answer for music and 
entertainment and your evtra- 

special occasions. Call 773-3588. 

10 I 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Business Opportunity 

Are you interested in a fun, 
profitable business from your 
home? Minimal investment. 
Allowing for substantial tax 
deductions, direct company 
bonuses, car, trips. 
770-0487 Quincy. H 13 



Miracle Of The Wood 
D M SO 

(organic) 

Distributed by St. Marks Inc. 464 
Granite Ave.. Milton. Mass. 617- 
698-0223. 7 30 



p. — — — 
I 

■ INDEX FOR 
| CLASSIFIED 

I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
l 
I 
I 
I 




CHECK ONE 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 
D Autos 

□ Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Pets, Livestock 

□ Lost and Found 

G Real Estate for Sale 
G Real Estate Wanted 
G Miscellaneous 
C Work Wanted 
G Antiques 
G Coins and Stamps 
G Rest Homes 
G Instruction 



MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN, 1 372 Hancock St.. Quincy 021 69 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Cash must accompany order 



E nclosed is 



for the following ad to run times 



COPY 



$3.20 for one week, up to 20 words, 5$ each additional word 
$3.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions 

of the same ad ... 54 each additonal word. 
$2.80 per week up to 20 words, for ten or more insertions 

of the same ad. 
No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of cancellation 

Deadline: Tuesday, noon 

Please include your phone number in ad. 



Single Rate: 
Contract Rates: 



Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday. Jul> M>, I9SI 



20,000 ROLLS 

STOCK WALLPAPER 



WALLTEX 
JOSEPHSON 



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NO-WAX VINYL FLOOR 

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50* ROLL 



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0OFF 






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RENTALS 



F*ee 

FREE 



Wallpaper Steamer 
with purchase of paper 
Aluminum Extension Ladder 
with purchase of paint 
Wallpaper Remover Pump 
with purchase of paper 

(SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY) 



r 



20% OFF 

Woven Woods 
Vertical Blinds 
Flexalum & Levolor Blinds 
Custom Window Shades 



J Reg. '59.95 £ 

********* 



PHOTO 
MURALS 

$ 24.95 



9x12 
100% NYLON 
CARPETS 

$89.95 



NO-WAX 

SELF-STICK TILES 
790,. $34.95 



case 



FLOOR TILES 

SELF-STICK 
19.95 case (45) 



RENTALS 

FLOOR SANDER 

CARPET SHAMP00ER 

RINSE-N-VAC 

CARPET CLEANEI 



FIBERGLASS INSULATING 

(ROOM DARKENING) 

Window Shades 

now $ 8.95 < 3m "> 



Dutch Boy Print 




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fg. 100, *ci» tU 



rfS, THANK YOU FOR YOUR 
PATRONAGE DURING THIS SECOND 
YEAR IN BUSINESS. WE LOOK 
FORWARD TO SERVING YOU IN THE 
FUTURE AND PUDGE TO PROVIDE 
YOU WITH TOP QUALITY PRODUCTS 
ALWAYS AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 




Vol. 13 No. 45 



Cmi'.'o 



.,.-,.,., »j?ou"pih 



II 







Thursday, August 6, 1981 





WORKING ON A TAN ARE Judy Mekosky, 25, (sitting) and her sister 
Margie Mekosky, 17, at Wollaston Beach. 

(Quincy Sun Plnilt> In Dm r (iiUimh) 

No Condos Planned 
For Long Island 



The Quincy Citizens Associa- 
tion has expressed concern over 
the possibility of high-rise 
condominiums being built on 
Long Island, which is part of the 
city of Boston. 

But the Quincy Planning 
Department says there are no 
such plans afoot. 

"We have been in touch with 
the BRA (Boston Redevelopment 
Agency)," said Planning Director 
James Lydon, "and they say that 
there is no truth to the rumors." 

The QCA wrote to Mayors 
Arthur H. Tobin of Quincy and 
Kevin H. White of Boston 
expressing its concern that the 



Long Island Hospital is to be 
phased out and replaced by 
condominiums. 

"A high rise condominium 
development," the letter pointed 
out, "would have a big impact on 
North Quincy and Squantum." 

Long Island can be reached by 
land only by traveling through 
North Quincy and Squantum, 
then by causeway to Moon Island 
and then by bridge to Long 
Island. 

The QCA asked that Tobin and 
members of the City Council 
"interest themselves in this Long 
Island condominium development 
project and let us know what is 
really going on." 



Brownell Meets With 
Barresi On MDC Evidence 



Rep. Thomas F. Brownell was 
scheduled to meet with State 
Inspector General Joseph R. 
Barresi yesterday (Wednesday) at 
2 p.m. to present his evidence of 
alleged corruption in the MDC. 

"We are making no specific 
charges," said Brownell, who was 
accompanied to the meeting by 
Rep. Philip W. Johnston of 
Marshfield. "We are simply 
turning over our files for the 
consideration of the inspector 
general and the Committee on 



Post Audit and Oversight." 

Two weeks ago, Brownell and 
Johnston said they had received 
evidence of possible corruption 
from former employees of the 
MDC. 

The charges included conflict of 
interest, the awarding of engineer 
titles to persons lacking in 
qualifications, and. with the 
elimination of the construction 
division, the possibility of 
contracts being awarded by a few 
top MDC officials. 



Rubber Checks Draw #5 Penalty 



People who "bounce" checks 
when paying for municipal 
services will face a $5 penalty 
under new legislation which takes 
effect this week, says Sen. Paul 
D. Harold. 

The legislation provides that 
when a check in payment of any 
municipal service, fee or charge is 
not paid, the city treasurer may 
impose a penalty of 1 per cent of 



the amount ol th> .heck. 



When th. 



for less than 



$500. the penalty is $5 under the 
statute. 

Harold said the new law 
provides for an appeal if the 
person who wrote the check can 
show he tendered it in good faith, 
with reasonable cause to believe 
it would be honored by his bank. 



Computer Error Blamed 

Revaluation Delay 
May Stall Tax Rate 

By TOM HENSHAW 

A new delay in achieving 100 per cent revaluation of property in Quincy 
could postpone the setting of the 1982 tax rate until some time in November. 

Chief Assessor John P. Comer said Tuesday he has been informed by P.R.C. 
Jacobs, the appraisal firm that is doing the revaluation, that the program has 
been delayed by another three to four weeks. 



The delay has been caused," 
Comer said he was told, "by a 
failure in the company's 
computerized system which 
resulted in the destruction of a file 
containing one complete category 
of values for residential properties. 

"The revaluation firm will have 
to reenter the information for this 
file into the data base and reprice 
the file before state certification of 
values can be requested by the 
Board of Assessors." 

What actually happened, Comer 
said, was "someone pushed the 
wrong button on the computer in 
McLean, Va., and erased the tape." 

That means it will be at least 
three or four weeks before the 
assessors can go to the State 
Department of Revenue for 
certification of 100 per cent 
valuation. 

Once certification is obtained, 
impact notices of the new property 
valuations will be sent to the 
taxpayers, who then have two 
months in which to appeal their 
new assessments. 

That could mean announcement 



of the tax rate in November. 

"I don't want to say that," said 
Comer. "I've gone to the City 
Council twice with dates that were 
furnished to me by P.R.C. Jacobs 
and they didn't hold up. I'm not 
estimating any more dates." 

Comer said he is "not unhappy" 
with the work of P.R.C. Jacobs, 
which is long overdue with the 
reval job. 

"I'm happy up to a point",he 
said, "but I'm getting a bit 
frustrated." 

One of the frustrations, he said, 
is that he returned from a two week 
vacation in Ireland last Friday to 
discover that Jacobs project 
manager in Quincy had quit for 
another job and a new man was in 
his place. 

"I don't like to have a new 
project manager, no matter how 
competent he is, going to work this 
far into the job," he said. 

Comer said P.R.C. Jacobs is 
bonded for completion of the job 
and has been paid monthly for its 
work, starting in March, 1980. 
About 70 per cent of the contract 



has been paid, he said. 

Comer said the computer tape 
file that was erased by mistake 
contained the valuations of 
outbuildings, such as garages, 
swimming pools and sheds, on 
some 20,000 parcels of land. 

Mayor Arthur H. Tobin said he 
is concerned about keeping the city 
running while the tax rate is being 
set. 

"We would have to borrow a lot 
of money to cover a delay of that 
magnitude," he said. "In an 
election year, I'm afraid that it 
might become a political football." 
Tobin said the city will also have 
to get up some $50,000 to pay for 
computer time on personal 
property, which was not included 
in the original proposal. 

"We knew we would have to pay 
it eventually," he said, adding that 
he did not know where the money 
is coming from. 

Tobin said Comer will take the 
city's problems to the State 
Department of Revenue to see if 

(Cont'd nn Pane 4) 



Council Candidates Score 
Fire Protection Gap At Point 



Much of Quincy Point was 
without direct fire coverage for 
some 30 hours on July 26-27 when 
the engine at the Quincy Point 
Station and backup engine were 
both out of action with mechanical 
problems. 

Acting Fire Chief Joseph C. 
Jackson said that, with "a slight 
delay in response time, Quincy 
Point was well protected by the 
Quincy Fire Department at all 
times" from the Central Fire 
Station. 

Joseph F. Cortese, a candidate 

for city councillor from Ward 2, 
demanded an investigation of the 
breakdown, adding that "the 
people of Quincy have a right to 
know if this is a front runner of 
things to come." 

And Ted DeCristofaro. another 
candidate, warned that, despite the 
constraints of Proposition 2 1/2, 
"it is imperative that the public 
safety of the residents of Ward 2 be 
maintained." 

Mayor Arthur H. Tobin said he 
was satisfied with Jackson's 
explanation of the incident. 

"It could have happened any- 
time notwithstanding Proposition 
2'/2," he said. 

"I hope the candidates for the 
City Council in Ward 2 will act 
responsibly and not cause alarm. 



I respect their right to voice 
concerns but I hope they will not 
spread uncalled for fears among 
the citizens." 

Jackson, acting chief in the 
vacation absence of Chief Edward 
F. Barry, said the "lack of 
protection for Quincy Point was 
unavoidable. It was just a simple 
case of running out of apparatus." 

During the time the two engines 
were out, Engine I from 
headquarters covered one run to 
Quincy Point, a rubbish fire at the 
Continental Marina at 3:43 a.m. 
Sunday, July 26. No one was 
injured. 

Jackson explained the incident 
like this: 

"Engine 3, located in Quincy 
Point developed engine trouble at 
8:30 p.m., Monday, July 20. 
Engine B from headquarters was 
immediately put in service at the 
Quincy Point station while Engine 
3 was being repaired. 

"At 1:46 a.m., Sunday, July 26, 
Engine B developed steering 
problems and had to be put out of 
service. 

"Since the Middleboro Fire 
Apparatus Co. is closed on 
Sunday, it was necessary to leave 
the station without apparatus 
because we didn't have another 
engine company to cover it 



"Monday morning the Fire 
Department mechanic picked up 
the necessary part from 
Middleboro Fire Apparatus Co., 
replaced the defective part and 
Engine B went back in service that 
afternoon at 3 p.m." 

Jackson said it is unusual for a 
cover piece of apparatus like 
Engine B to break down while 
replacing another piece of broken 
down equipment. 

Not all of Quincy Point was 
faced with a delay in response time, 
he said, adding that under 
ordinary circumstances equipment 
from headquarters often beats 
Engine 3 to fires in some sections 
of the Point. 

Engine B, which is based at the 
Central Fire Station, is the reserve 
engine that faces elimination under 
Proposition 2 1/2. The city and 
the firefighters now are bargaining 
to preserve it. 

"I need not tell you how 
important fire protection is to the 
residents of Quincy Point," said 
DeCristofaro in a letter to Chief 
Barry. 

"Our senior citizen housing units 
and many other residential 
dwellings make adequate fire 
coverage a must. 

"With the implementation of 



Special License Board Meeting Aug. 1 1 



A special summer meeting of 
the Quincy License Board has 
been called for Tuesday. Aug. 1 1 . 
at 10 a.m. at City Hall. 



Members will discuss matters 
which have come to their 
attention since the board recessed 
for the summer at the end ol 



June. 



Regular weekly meetings will 
reconvene in September. 



F 



Pafe 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 6, 1981 



O'Connell Brothers Join 
In Marina Development 



OCB, Inc.. the O'Connell 
Brothers construction company, 
is about to become involved with 
Marina Industries in development 
of the old Squantum Naval Air 
Station land. 

Peter O'Connell, president of 
OCB, Inc., said papers setting up 
the joint venture are expected to 
be signed within the next 30 to 60 
days. 



OCB will have the controlling 
interest, he said. 

The venture hinges on the 
financial arrangements, he said, 
adding that several banks have 
indicated their interest. He sees 
no problem with money, he said. 

The first item of development 
on the marina site, which is 
owned by Boston Edison, is the 
so-called Harborside project, 142 



units oi umumninium housing on 
the easterly side of the site. 

The project has already gained 
approval of the City Council 
under Planned Unit Development 
with 15 restrictive amendments. 

One of the restrictions is that a 
second access road be found for 
the site and negotiations are 
being conducted with Jordan 
Marsh to take over Commander 
Shea Boulevard. 



True Test Of Prop 2V4 
Yet To Come Says McCauley 



City Councillor Francis X. 
McCauley, a candidate for mayor, 
says that the next fiscal year, 
1983, "will provide the true test 
of Proposition 2Vi for the city of 
Quincy." 

McCauley spoke at a recent 
meeting of a tenants' association. 

"The next mayor of Quincy will 
face the monumental task of 
maintaining essential city 
services, while complying with 
Proposition 2Ws requirement to 
reduce the city's tax levy by an 
additional 15 per cent." 



McCauley said. 

While basic city services such 
as fire and police protection must 
be maintained at acceptable 
levels, it is also important that 
personnel in other city depart- 
ments be adequate to provide for 
the city's needs, he continued. 

McCauley expressed concern 
that the library department has 
been cut by over 50 per cent and 
that the engineering department 
has been literally wiped out. 

Many residents, he said, have 
expressed their concern to him 
twmf reductions in the fire depart- 



ment. He pointed out that he, 
along with Councillor James A. 
Sheets, were the only councillors 
to vote against a cut in the 1981 
fire department personnel 
budget. 

McCauley expressed the hope 
that the 10 firefighters laid off in 
April can be returned to duty as 
soon as possible. 

If elected mayor, McCauley 
pledged that he would squeeze 
every ounce of fat out of the 1983 
budget but would also strive to 
see that essential city services are 
maintained. 




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REP. ROBERT A. CERASOLI displayssome of the drug paraphernalia 
that would be outlawed if his bill becomes law. Plastic gun in his hand is 
used to pump marijuana smoke into the smoker's mouth. 

(Quincv Sun I'hnlit by Dart- Gitlonly) 

Cerasoli Supports King On 
Drug Paraphernalia Bill 

Rep. Robert A. Cerasoli has 
announced his active support of 
Gov. Edward J. King's bill that 
would prevent the sale of drug 
paraphernalia. 

Cerasoli has also sponsored a 
drug paraphernalia bill that will 
accompany the King bill to the 
House floor. 

Drug paraphernalia is any 
device or equipment intended to 
produce, store, or use any type of 
drug. These objects have become 
an entire industry with head- 
shops, store displays, trade 
magazines, and associations 
glamorizing the use of drugs. 

Items disguised as frisbees, 
necklaces, pens, and toys are 
examples of the drug 
paraphernalia that would be 
banned. A mandatory sentence of 
up to two vears or $1,000. wouM 



be the penalty for the sale of such 
items. 

Selling drug paraphernalia to a 
minor is a more severe crime, due 
to the fact that young people are 
more attracted to these items to 
use and conceal drugs. Offenders 
will receive a mandatory sentence 
of up to five years or $5,000 or 
both. 

Cerasoli saiJ he is prepared to 
debate the importance of the bill. 

"This bill received a favorable 
vote out of the House Judiciary 
Committee," he said. "I am 
optimistic that it will become law 
this year." 

"The durg paraphernalia 
industry has grown out of 
proportion. The passage of this 
bill will limit this growth and in 
turn discourage some of the drug 
usage so apparent today." 



Police Ass n Head QCA Speaker 



Henry Bradley, president of the 
Quincy Police Betterment 
Association, was scheduled to 
speak on the problems of police 
work last night (Wednesday) at 8 
p.m. at the monthly meeting of 
the Quincy Citizens Association at 
the Montclair Men's Club. 



Two $200 QCA educational 
scholarships were to be awarded 
to Kathleen A. Carmody, 916 Sea 
St., a 1981 graduate of Quincy 
High School, and Robert F. 
Murphy, 38 Vane St., a June 
graduate of North Quincy High 
School. 







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Open Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 A.M. — 5:30 P.M. 

Open Thurs eves 'til 8 30 



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Thursday, August *, I Ml Quincy Sun Page J 



Morrissey Joins 
FAA Move Protest 



Rep. Michael W. Morrissey has 
joined other members of the 
Legislature in memorializing 
Congress to keep the Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA) 
New England Regional Office in 
Burlington open. 

Current plans call for a consoli- 
dation of the 11 regional offices 
into six to achieve greater 
efficiency and monetary savings. 

"The proposed plan would 
close the New York Regional 
Office and consolidate Northeast 
operations in Burlington," said 
Morrissey. 

"There is a move afoot to stop 



or reverse this plan, which would 
have an extremely adverse affect 
on the New England region, and 
cause a loss of some 400 jobs. ' ' 

Morrissey said the Massa- 
chusetts Port Authority and the 
FAA have been extremely helpful 
to neighboring communities in 
alleviating airplane noise and 
developing the most advanced 
noise monitoring system in the 
country. 

He stressed that this success 
could not have been achieved had 
the FAA regional office been 
located